Mountainland Association of Governments

The Mountainland Association of Governments’ area of service comprises Summitt, Utah, and Wasatch Counties and the cities contained therein.

To assist MAG counties in the preparing of CRMP documents a public survey to identify resource priorities was conducted. Also, a wide variety of resource plans were reviewed from local, state, and federal agencies.

MAG Public Survey

MAG Public Survey

The three MAG counties solicited public comment through an on-line survey, implemented between June 29 and September 9, 2016. The public was notified of the availability of the survey through press releases, public service announcements, public meetings, county fairs, and other means. A total of 894 responses were obtained.

 

Public Land Resource Values

The first survey question asked respondents to rank seven public land resource values from highest to lowest. On average, respondents from the three counties all ranked “protecting water quality” as the highest of the seven. “Maximizing natural resource development” ranked lowest in all three counties.

 

Resource Management Planning Priorities

The next question asked respondents about county resource management planning priorities. Respondents rated 19 topics on a 1-10 scale. The majority of the topics were rated above the scale midpoint, suggesting that survey respondents support a multiple use approach to county resource management planning. Consistent with the first survey question, water quality was the highest rated topic. Predator control and mining, energy, and minerals were the only two topics that respondents rated at or below the scale midpoint. This may possibly indicate that respondents do not perceive these to be major public land issues in the MAG counties or that these resources are perceived to be less of a responsibility for the counties.

Average Rating on 1-10 Scale (1 = Very Low Priority, 10 = Very High Priority)
Resource Planning TopicSummit CountyUtah CountyWasatch County
Water quality and hydrology9.18.68.5
Air quality8.87.98.4
Forestry and fire management8.37.87.4
Land use7.87.97.5
Wild and scenic rivers8.47.68.1
Wildlife and fisheries8.27.67.6
Wilderness8.47.58.3
Land access7.17.87.5
Recreation and tourism7.47.57.7
Water rights, irrigation, ditches and canals7.57.57.3
Cultural, historical, geological, and paleontological resources7.67.17.4
Threatened, endangered, and sensitive species8.16.97.4
Wetlands and riparian areas8.26.67.3
Floodplains and river terraces7.46.76.8
Law enforcement on public lands6.96.76.6
Noxious weeds7.36.26.5
Agriculture, livestock, and grazing6.26.35.5
Predator control4.65.74.8
Mining, energy, and minerals including distribution3.85.14.0

Top 5 Resource Priorities

In the next survey question, respondents were asked to pick their “top 5” resource priorities from the 19 topics in the previous question. Water quality was again the most frequently identified in all three counties. Air quality and recreation and tourism were among the top 5 in all three counties. Respondents from Utah County and Wasatch County picked land access and land use as being among their top 5 resource planning categories. In Summit County, wilderness and wildlife and fisheries were among the top 5 resource planning topics.

Top 5 Resource Planning Topics
Summit CountyPercent
Selecting
 Utah CountyPercent
Selecting
 Wasatch CountyPercent Selecting
Water Quality and Hydrology66.9%Water Quality and Hydrology66.9%Water Quality and Hydrology67.9%
Wilderness48.1%Air Quality42.0%Air Quality47.2%
Air Quality45.9%Land Access42.0%Recreation and Tourism47.2%
Recreation and Tourism36.8%Recreation and Tourism40.6%Land Use47.2%
Wildlife, Fisheries34.6%Land Use39.8%Land Access45.3%

 

Survey Respondents

There were noticeably more responses from Utah County residents (505). There were 133 responses from Summit County residents and 53 responses from Wasatch County residents. There were also 69 responses from residents of other counties in Utah, and 7 responses from non-Utah residents. A total of 127 did not answer the demographic questions section; response patterns from these respondents did not differ from the others.
MAG Plan Review Bibliography

MAG Plan Review Bibliography

Full Citation
Envision Utah. 2014. Wasatch Choices 2040: A Four County Land-Use and Transportation Vision.
Kamas Valley Conservation District and Summit County Conservation District. 2013. Summit County Resource Assessment
Mountain Accord. 2014. Mountain Accord, Vision, Goals, and Metrics.
Mountain Accord. 2014. The Accord.
School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA). 2012. TITLE R850. SCHOOL AND INSTITUTIONAL TRUST LANDS, ADMINISTRATION.
State of Utah. 2013. Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah.
State of Utah. 2012. Agriculture Susustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture
Summit County. 2013. Eastern Summit County General Plan
Summit County. 2015. Snyderville Basin General Plan
U.S. Bureau of Land Management. 2008. Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, October. 182 p.
U.S. Bureau of Land Mangement, Salt Lake District. 1990. Record of Decision for the Pony Express Resource Management Plan and Rangeland Program Summary for Utah County
U.S. Bureau of Land Mangement, Salt Lake District. 1975. Park City Management Framework Plan
U.S. Forest Service. 1986. Manti-La Sal Land and Resource Management Plan
U.S. Forest Service, Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. 2008. Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, Amendment # 2
U.S. Forest Service, Wasatch-Cache National Forest. 2008. Revised Forest Plan for the Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Amendment # 5
Uinta National Forest. 2003. Land and Resource Management Plan
Utah County. 2014. Utah County General Plan
Utah County. n.d.. Goshen Valley Specific Area Plan
Utah County Conservation Districts. 2013. Utah County Resource Assessment
Utah Division of Forestry, Fire, and State Lands. 2016. Utah Forest Action Plan
Utah Division of State Parks and Recreation. 2001. Utah Lake State Park Resource Management Plan
Utah Division of State Parks and Recreation. 1999. Camp Floyd/Stagecoach Inn State Park and Museum
Utah Division of State Parks and Recreation. 2008. Flight Park State Recreation Area, Area Management Plan
Utah Division of State Parks and Recreation. 1998. Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan
Utah Division of State Parks and Recreation. 2010. Wasatch Mountain State Park Resource Management Plan
Utah Division of State Parks and Recreation. 2012. Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan
Utah Division of State Parks and Recreation. 2003. Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. 2014. Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan, Department of Natural Resources, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. 2015. Utah Predator Control Program Summary 2014-2015.
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and the Aquatic Invasive Species Taskforce. 2009. Utah Aquatic Invasive Species Management Plan
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and the Cougar Advisory Group. 2015. Utah Cougar Management Plan V. 3 2015 - 2025.
Utah Weed Advisory Council and Utah Weed Control Assocation. 2004. Utah Strategic Plan for Managing Noxious and Invasive Weeds.
Wasatch Conservation District. 2012. Wallsburg Coordinated Resource Management Plan
Wasatch County Conservation District. 2013. Wasatch County Resource Assessment
Wasatch County General Plan. 2016. Wasatch County General Plan
Wasatch-Cache National Forest. 2003. Revised Forest Plan for the Wasatch-Cache National Forest.
Wasatch-Cache National Forest. 2006. Wasatch-Cache National Forest Noxious Weed Treatment Program. Final Environmental Impact Statement.
Utah Division of Water Resources. 2001. Utah's Water Resources: Planning for the Future
Utah Division of Water Resources. 2014. Utah Lake Basin Planning for the Future
Utah Division of Water Resources. 2009. Weber River Basin Planning for the Future
Utah Division of Water Resources. 2014. Utah's M&I Water Conservation Plan: Investing in the Future
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. 2015. Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan
Morgan-Summit Adaptive Resource Management Local Working Group (MSARM). 2006. Morgan-Summit Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) Local Conservation Plan. Utah State University Extension and Jack H. Berryman Institute and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. Salt Lake City, Utah. Unpublished Report.
Strawberry Valley Adaptive Resource Management Local Working Group (SVARM). 2006. Strawberry Valley Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) Local Conservation Plan. Utah State University Extension, Jack H. Berryman Institute and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. Salt Lake City, Utah. Unpublished Report.
Utah Lake Commission. 2009. Utah Lake Master Plan
Wasatch County Public Works Department. 2009. Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County
MAG Plan Review Matrix

MAG Plan Review Matrix

Download the Plan Review Table.

Resource CategorySubcategoryGoals and PoliciesPlanPage
AgricultureRecognize agricultural operations as a significant and important use of the land.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureConsider those land use patterns and strategies that support and protect existing and future agricultural operations; support the development of tools and programs to allow the preservation of productive agricultural lands. Among others these may include agricultural preservation areas, plat notes and other methods to educate new
residents of the agricultural nature of the area, cooperative agreements with landowners, and a program to transfer density from agriculturally productive lands.
Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureImplement Agricultural Protection and Right to Farm strategies, and require all non-agricultural activities to develop in a manner that is harmonious with nearby agricultural operations.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureReevaluate and possibly amend the Development Code to streamline the process for designating and modifying Agricultural Protection / Preservation areas.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureCoordinate with the Eastern Summit County Agriculture and Open Space Committee (ESAP) and the affected municipalities in the acquisition of conservation easements and/or restrictions to preserve agricultural lands and open space.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
AgricultureWork with property owners to maintain working farms and ranches
as a viable industry.
Snyderville Basin General Plan8
AgricultureRecognize agricultural operations as a significant and important use
of the land and protect the rights of those uses.
Snyderville Basin General Plan19
AgricultureAgriculture is a significant economic utilization of land in unincorporated Utah County and should merit a strong emphasis in land use policies and regulations.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
AgriculturePrime agricultural land should be kept in agricultural production or available for agricultural production.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
AgricultureZones should be created which have the sole purpose of protecting and fostering production agriculture.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
AgricultureContinue to provide the option for the landowner to apply for an Agriculture Protection Area.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
AgricultureThe Farmland Assessment Act should be maintained as one method of preserving farm land in Utah County.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
AgricultureConsideration should be given to support economically feasible land use alternatives to local and enterprising farm owners to generate supplementary farm income while promoting the preservation of agricultural open space.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
AgricultureMaintain prime and other agricultural land in active production, and retain the traditional rural nature of the unincorporated countyUtah County General PlanCh. 1
AgricultureSupport a variety of methods to preserve agricultural landUtah County General PlanCh. 1
AgricultureAttempt to assimilate new development with working agricultural uses.Wasatch County General Plan66
AgricultureProtect the rural agricultural economy of the county by establishing agricultural operations as a priority use of the land, protect existing and future agricultural operations, and encourage farmers and ranchers to stay on the land.Wasatch County General Plan77
AgricultureFarms of all sizes provide a number of benefits that are critical to our quality of life. They produce food, fiber, nursery stock, and flowers. They clothe us, beautify our surroundings, and supply us with the energy we need everyday. All of these products can be imported from outside Utah, but the cost of transporting them and the concerns with the safety, nutrition and availability of imported products make having the local capacity to produce food very important and beneficial. We do not want to become dependent on foreign sources for such a basic critical need as foodSummit County Resource Assessment and Utah County Resource Assessment18
AgricultureWe have to make it easier for farmers and ranchers to make a living on the land available to them.
Strategies can include:
Provide new markets for agricultural products.
Find ways to keep more of the billions of dollars we spend each year on food within the state of Utah.
Use new media, the internet, and other innovative marketing strategies to inform the public of our efforts.
Change tax policies and zoning regulations to favor agricultural production.
Create other options to help promote the economic health of our farms and ranches.
Utilize current tools, such as conservation easements or transfer of de-elopement rights to ensure that our agricultural lands are permanently protected, can be used when necessary to protect the health of these vital assets. Another important tool is the USU Extension Service’s ability to provide critical information to our farmers and ranchers
Utah County Resource Assessment13
Air QualityEvaluationsEvaluations will consider the impacts of any proposed projects to soil, water, and air resources in the affected area.BLM Pony Express RMP30
Air QualityStandardsAir quality will be maintained or improved in accordance with State and Federal standards, including consultation with State agencies on proposed projects that may significantly affect air quality. Management actions on public land will be designed to protect against significant air quality deterioration.BLM Pony Express RMP31
Air QualityStandardsProtect and improve air quality for protection of public health, environmental health, and scenic visibility.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Air QualityStandardsEnsure National Forest management activities result in meeting state and federal air quality standards, and comply with local, state and federal air quality regulations and requirements.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Air QualityStandardsEnhance air quality.Wasatch Choices 204018
Air QualityEnsure that development does not contribute significantly to the degradation of air quality and minimizes the impacts of wood burning stoves, automobiles, or other similar air quality pollutants by:
a. Coordinating with the Summit County Health Department to support and implement air quality initiatives.
b. Prohibiting the use of new wood burning appliances and incentivize the replacement of old wood burning devices.
c. Adopting an anti-idling ordinance.
d. Coordinating with the Summit County Engineering Department to amend the Construction Mitigation Plan requirements to ensure mitigation of post emissions on constructions sites.
Snyderville Basin General Plan22
Air QualityContinue to work with Park City Municipal, the Utah Department of Transportation (“UDOT”), and others to develop, maintain, and promote a regional transportation system to help reduce air pollution in the BasinSnyderville Basin General Plan22
Air QualityManagement activities do not cause exceedances of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) (this monitoring is required by law).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42402
Air QualityActivities on the Forest do not impede attainment of state clean air standards.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42402
Air QualityLand development patterns which degrade air quality should be discouraged.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Air QualityAllow development in the Heber Valley area without compromising the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.Wasatch County General Plan67
Air QualityDetermining the number of residential units that could be permitted in the Heber Valley air shed without violating the National Ambient Air Quality Standards is beyond the scope and resources of this planning effort. Therefore, the number of residential units on an interim bases (until an Air Quality Study can be completed) shall be established at the level that would have been permitted by current Land Use and Health Department Regulations.Wasatch County General Plan67
Air QualityDiscourage extensive use of wood burning stoves as a means in preserve present air quality.Wasatch County General Plan67
Air QualityWasatch County air quality will be protected by standards described in the Utah State Implementation Plan approved by the EPA, whose authority is the Clean Air Act of 1990.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityHigh-level air quality is necessary to prevent restrictions on future economic development.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityBaseline air quality data must be established for Wasatch County with full participation of the County. Decisions must be based on this data.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityAir in Wasatch County must be protected from degradation by outside sources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Air QualityProtect or enhance air quality.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42433
Air QualityProtect or enhance air quality.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Air Quality1) Meet State and federal air quality objectives.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-43
Air QualityWildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Protect air quality values from adverse effects from air pollution.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-91
Air QualityRecreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Manage facilities in and adjacent to recreation sites to maintain acceptable levels of air quality.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-51
Air QualityManage Forest activities so that air quality is compatible with Federal and State standards.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Manage cultural, historic, and paleontologic resources to allow research and/or interpretive activities, when possible, while protecting significant attributes of units from natural or human-caused degradation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologyAreas of erosion on public land will be identified and evaluated to identify sources and determine improvements.BLM Pony Express RMP30
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingA monitoring plan will be developed for the Resource Area. This plan will present a systematic scheme for examining significant sites over time to determine the causal agent and whether there is any deterioration of the sites. Steps may then be taken to protect the sites being damaged.BLM Pony Express RMP49
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingAs time and funding allow, BLM will evaluate all recorded [cultural resource] sites on public lands within the Resource Area and assign them to one of three management categories, indicating availability for: (1) immediate scientific research, (2) recreation use/interpretation, or (3) conservation for future use.BLM Pony Express RMP49
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingCultural resources (which include historic and prehistoric sites, artifacts, structures or locales) will continue to be inventoried and evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Such evaluation will consider the impacts of any proposed project to cultural resources in the affected area. Stipulations will be attached as appropriate to assure compatibility of projects with management objectives for cultural resources.BLM Pony Express RMP49
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationEfforts will be undertaken on a regular and systematic basis to educate the public on the values of preserving their historic and prehistoric heritage.BLM Pony Express RMP50
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingA predictive model of archaeological site locations shall be developed to provide the basis for the protection of cultural resources.BLM Pony Express RMP50
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationFully integrate the Heritage Program into land and resource management.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationImplement the National Heritage Strategy emphasizing the need for non-project inventories (Section 110) and public education and awareness programs.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingInventory, evaluate, protect and enhance heritage sites and landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProvide for the revision of existing and development of new inventories of culturally
significant structures, sites, and landmarks within Eastern Summit County.
Eastern Summit County General Plan3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesConsider development of a heritage preservation plan.Eastern Summit County General Plan3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesEvaluate the need to adopt a local ordinance that would require, at a minimum,
documentation prior to demolition or alteration of any structures, sites or landmarks
identified in the heritage preservation inventory. If measures beyond documentation
are implemented, consider development of funding sources and/or incentives for
preservation.
Eastern Summit County General Plan3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesIdentify and recognize amenities important to the community heritage of
the Basin and work to preserve such amenities to the greatest extent possible.
Snyderville Basin General Plan19
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesA survey should be conducted to identify heritage amenities.
Identified amenities should be of high priority for preservation through relocation,
adaptive reuse, preservation in place, facade easements, conservation
easements, or other methods.
Snyderville Basin General Plan19
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesAdopt a comprehensive Heritage Amenities and Cultural Arts Plan (the “Heritage Plan”) in the Basin. This Heritage Plan should provide specific provisions for the type, amount, and manner in which public art or heritage preservation will be incorporated into a development project, or cash-in-lieu contribution to public art in the Basin.Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesThe County should consider appropriate incentives to property owners for the purposes of preserving heritage amenities.Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesPlants and use areas associated with traditional uses (e.g., sustenance, medicine, and ceremony) that are culturally significant to Native American communities are identified and maintained or protected.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42418
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesPreserve, protect, and make access available to historical sitesUtah County General PlanCh. 1
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesPriority should be given to the preservation of historic buildings, roadways, railroad sites, and other historic landmarks.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesUtah County should establish a county registry or utilize any existing county registry for those important historic sites which are not included on the National Historic Register.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesA citizens committee should be considered to evaluate and recommend preservation sites for the register, increase public awareness and appreciation, as well as procure donations and grants for preservation, maintenance, and restoration.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesThe grounds around historic buildings and sites should be tied to an extended park site or connected to the county trails system wherever possible.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProvide the public with the opportunity to learn about the natural,
cultural and historical resources of the area and the need for courtesy
and safety.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect the cultural and paleontological resources of the area.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42433
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect the areas cultural and historical resources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect natural and cultural resources to the extent practicable
within the operational constraints of the reservoir.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect the areas cultural and paleontological resources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProvide interpretation and educational opportunities of cultural
and natural resources where appropriate.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesIdentify the present integrity and eligibility of cultural resources,
including historic, prehistoric, and paleontological resources, where
development is proposed.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42467
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesRecommend mechanisms to protect, preserve, restore, recognize, and
interpret historic, prehistoric, and paleontological resource sites.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42467
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological Resources1) Describe, as appropriate, high interest or unique geological, paleontological, biological, archeological, or historical features for public information and, as appropriate, develop interpretive information for these sites.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-17
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological Resources1) Protect, find an adaptive use for, and or interpret cultural and paleontological resources on National Forest System (NFS) lands which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the National Register of Historic Landmarks, or may be determined to be eligible for the national registers.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-16
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological Resources2) Nominate or recommend cultural or paleontological sites to the National Register of Historic Places or National Natural Landmarks in the following priority: A) Sites representing multiple themes; B) Sites representing themes which are not currently on the National Register within the state; or C) Sites representing themes which are currently represented by single sites.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological Resources3) Describe, as appropriate, high interest or unique geological, paleontological, biological, archeological, or historical features for public information and, as appropriate, develop interpretive information for these sites.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological Resources3) Protect and foster public use and enjoyment of cultural and paleontological resources: A) Complete appropriate studies to provide information necessary for an adequate review of the effect a proposed undertaking may have on cultural values; B) Give adequate consideration of modifications or alterations to proposed undertakings that could avoid, mitigate, or minimize adverse effects; C) Collect and record information from sites where appropriate; D) Issue antiquities permits to qualifying academic institutions or other approved organizations for the study and research of sites; E) Interpret sites as appropriate, and foster public appreciation of these resources.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesMineral/Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(10) Include a lease notice on leases in the San Juan Analysis Area to notify lessees that there is a high density of known cultural resource sites in the lease and that measures will be required to mitigate impacts consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act and the Archaeological Resources Protection Act. This notice also notifies lessees that all surface disturbing activities must be monitored by a professional archaeologist approved by the Forest Service, unless otherwise specified.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesLocate and determine the significance of paleontological, historical, and archeological sites and, as appropriate, nominate sites to the National Register.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesMake select paleontological, historical and archeological sites available for study by agencies involved in research and education.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesManage selected historical and archeological sites for public use, while still protecting the values of the site.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesProtect from theft and/or vandalism cultural, historical, and paleontological resources.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicCritical Slopes: Slopes of thirty percent or more are declared to be critical areas because there is a high probability that onsite and downslope property damage and water quality, fisheries and wildlife habitat deterioration may result from their development. Revegetation difficulties are compounded by the Basin’s short growing season, making the reclamation of disturbed slopes more costly, and long term success of reclamation may be difficult. Development that accelerates the erosion of soil, and thereby contributes significantly to the sedimentation of stream corridors, should not be allowed.Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicAvalanche Tracks: Development layout and design should avoid areas which may be adversely affected by avalanche tracks. All known avalanche tracks are declared to be critical areas because of the high probability that development in such hazardous areas may result in property damage, damage to public utilities and roads serving the development, and possible injury or loss of life.Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicalResource uses are provided for while preserving the unique physical, cultural, ecological, hydrological, and biological characteristics of the ecosystems in all known caves on the Forest that are currently classified as “significant” under the provisions of the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act of 1988, as well as in caves that may be identified in the future as “significant.”Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42404
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicalAllow no development on slopes greater than thirty (30) percent.Wasatch County General Plan66
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGeologicalA sensitivity map will be developed which will depict the geological formations and areas with known potential to contain important paleontological resources. Should a proposed surface-disturbing project be within an area of high sensitivity for paleontological resources, the State paleontologist will be consulted prior to the issuance of a decision.BLM Pony Express RMP50
Ditches and CanalsPotential reservoir sites and delivery system corridors shall be identified in land use plans and protected from federal or state action that would prohibit or restrict future use for those purposes. Said plans would include provisions for adding or deleting potential reservoir sites and delivery system corridors when deemed appropriate.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Ditches and CanalsAgency actions shall recognize all legal canal, lateral, and ditch easements and rights-of-way.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Economic ConsiderationsMaximize the financial resources available to reinvest in improving and protecting Central Wasatch assets.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics3
Economic ConsiderationsImprove quality of life for residents.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics3
Economic ConsiderationsEmphasis is placed on minimizing natural resource and water quality degradations resulting from maintenance activities. Safety and the preservation of capital investments are emphasized.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Economic ConsiderationsCritical infrastructure, such as roads and administrative and recreation sites, are protected.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Economic ConsiderationsSafe, adequate, and economical facilities support public and administrative uses of National Forest System lands.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Economic ConsiderationsProvide the opportunity for human resource programs that assist the disadvantaged with resource use and employment opportunities.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Economic ConsiderationsWithin the Forests capability, provide the opportunity for sustained economic growth of industries and communities dependent upon Forest outputs.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Energy ResourcesEfficiency/conservationPromote conservation of energy.Wasatch Choices 204018
Energy ResourcesEncourage development of renewable resources as a substitute for oil, natural gas, and other limited energy supplies used for electricity generation, and to reduce consumption of these supplies.Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Energy ResourcesWork with appropriate public agencies to permit and approve development of alternative energy.Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Energy ResourcesConsider incentives to encourage green building practices such as LEED or
Energy STAR certification and use of recycled materials.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Energy ResourcesEncourage community site design techniques that promote sustainable land use practices by:
a. Implementing requirements for lot and building orientation to maximize sustainable design opportunities.
b. Coordinating with the Summit County Building Department to implement incentives for energy efficiency and sustainable site design.
c. Updating the lighting regulations to allow for the newest technologies that allow for the most efficient lighting.
Snyderville Basin General Plan22
Energy ResourcesAllow exploration and subsequent development of oil and gas to meet the
national demand for these resources, consistent with national energy policies
and related demands.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)13
Energy ResourcesMake geothermal steam available for use on a managed and controlled
basis consistent with national energy policies and related demands.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)17
Energy ResourcesOpportunities to develop projects that demonstrate state of the art environmental protection techniques and landscape-compatible design of oil and gas production facilities are utilized.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42417
Energy ResourcesEncourage exploration of energy and minerals on public land to ensure that our future energy needs and resource management opportunities are considered. Agencies shall plan, fund, and encourage by policy and management decisions relative to energy resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Energy ResourcesAfter environmental analysis, and as provided for in the governing resource management plan, all tracts will be available and offered for lease or opened to be claimed as provided by law. Wasatch County recognizes that, while all Federal administered land within the county is currently available for lease, decisions are made regarding oil and gas leases through the land use planning process. Alternatives identify areas where leasing may occur with standard lease terms, timing and controlled surface use stipulations or no surface occupancy. Additionally, some areas may be considered for no leasing in the future.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Energy ResourcesAll permits and applications must be processed on a timely basis, in accordance with Onshore Oil and Gas Order Number 1. Procedures and required contents of application must be provided by the applicant at the time of application.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Energy Resources1) Consent/Nonconsent to coal leasing, permits, or licensing, or objection/nonobjection to oil and gas leasing and permits are based on management requirements of individual management units. Stipulations for these actions should minimize and/or mitigate effects or conflicts with other resource uses and should return disturbed lands to conditions compatible with the emphasis of the management unit or adjacent management unit. a. Any lease, license or permit may be denied or limited by standard or additional other stipulations where proposed activities could result in irreparable damage, may preclude existing uses, or be contrary to management direction. The following areas would not be administratively available for oil and gas leasing (Plate 3, Oil and Gas Leasing Map, Alternative III (Modified Forest Plan)). (1) The Peavine Corridor SPR Management Unit. (2) The La Sal Peaks Oil and Gas Analysis Area would not be leased, pending completion of the next Forest Plan review Scheduled for 1997. (3) The peaks and major passes of the Abajo Mountains would not be leased, pending completion of the next Forest Plan review scheduled for 1997. (4) That portion of the Sinbad Ridge/Sewemup Mesa area that extends north of Salt Creek and Garvey Gulch, pending completion of the next Forest Plan review scheduled for 1997 and/or completion of the current wilderness evaluation for the Sewemup Mesa Wilderness Study Area. (5) High density/low disturbance cultural resource areas in the San Juan Analysis Area.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-35
Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(1) Slopes are steeper than 35%. Could be excepted if it is determined that erosion and sediment yield can be controlled, reclamation would be consistent with Forest Plan goals, land stability would not be induced, and visual quality objectives would be met. This would occur most often on roads.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-35
Energy ResourcesVisualsc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(11) Include a lease notice on leases in the Moab, Fisher, Dark Canyon, Indian Creek, and San Juan Analysis Areas to inform lessees that the Forest Service will exercise discretionary authority to require operations to be located and designed to minimize or prevent visibility as viewed from National Parks or Monuments.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Energy ResourcesLand Usec. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(12) Include a lease notice on leases that include Sinbad Ridge to notify lessees that the Forest Service will exercise discretionary to require operations to be located and designed to minimize visibility and noise from the Sewemup Mesa Wilderness Study Area.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(2) Geologic and erosion hazard is high. Could be excepted if it is demonstrated that operations would not cause instability or the site can be stabilized.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(5) Within 200 feet of arterial or major collector roads and highways. Could be excepted if it is demonstrated that operations would provide for public safety, would not interfere with the transportation system, and would be consistent with visual quality objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_03_06
Energy ResourcesVisualsc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(7) Within Retention and Preservation Visual Quality Objective areas. Could be excepted if it is determined that operations could be adequately screened from view and would meet the visual quality objective.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Energy ResourcesMiningc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(9) Include a lease notice on leases in the Price River, Huntington Canyon, Cottonwood, and Muddy Creek Analysis areas to notify lessees that special measures could be required to mitigate potential conflicts with coal development.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Energy ResourcesLand Used. Coal lands will be determined to be suitable for coal leasing through the application of unsuitability and multiple-use criteria (43 CFR 3461 and 43 CFR 3420). Coal leases may be denied or limited by special stipulations where:
(1) They are not in compliance with the unsuitability criteria or multiple land use decisions established for the unit (Appendix C).
(2) Surface or transportation facilities needed for operations degrade water quantity or quality.
(3) Operations would impair the current quality of recreation.
(4) National Recreation Trails occur.
(5) Operations would result in unacceptable or unmitigateable impact on wildlife or fisheries.
(6) Operations could result in aggravating land instability.
(7) An established need for additional coal cannot be demonstrated.
(8) Operations and/or production would result in unacceptable and unmitigateable impacts to Human Resource Units. (communities)
(9) Operations would result in unacceptable or unstable traffic flows.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-36
Energy Resourcese. Extraction of coal shall be by underground mining methods.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-36
Energy ResourcesProvide appropriate opportunities for and manage activities related to locating, leasing, exploration, development, and production of mineral and energy resources.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Fire ManagementEcologyObjectives for fire management are planned results which can more than likely be attained and are categorized by vegetation type. [The plan identifies fire management objectives by vegetation types]BLM Pony Express RMP61
Fire ManagementEcologyPrescribed fire will be used as a resource management tool. Prescribed burns within the areas will be used to alter vegetation for the benefit of watershed, livestock grazing and/or wildlife habitat. The areas selected for prescribed burning will have the potential for natural revegetation.BLM Pony Express RMP61
Fire ManagementSuppressionAll facilities, structures or developments that are susceptible to fire damage will receive intensive suppression. The primary objective with this level of suppression is to prevent loss of life, property, or unacceptable resource damage. All other public lands in the Resource Area will be considered conditional suppression. On these lands the intensity of suppression actions is not fixed and will vary with the conditions occurring at the time of start. These conditional suppression areas will be managed on a least cost plus resource loss basis. In these areas, the full spectrum of intensities is to be considered and the determination on which intensity level to initiate suppression is based on the conditions at the time.BLM Pony Express RMP61
Fire ManagementSuppressionAll wildfires on public land will receive some level of suppression. The authorized officer has the responsibility to determine the intensity of the suppression effort to meet the overall protection objective to put the fire out with minimum suppression cost and minimal losses, consistent with management objectives.BLM Pony Express RMP56
Fire ManagementSuppressionBLM will prepare vegetation modification plans for Skull Valley and Puddle Valley to reduce wildfire and attempt to stop or reverse the cheatgrass conversion cycle.BLM Pony Express RMP61
Fire ManagementPreparednessCreate outreach and assist homeowners with identifying grant sources and programs for implementing defensible space on private property.National Fire Plan Community Assistance Program9
Fire ManagementEcologyIncrease the active use of fire to return fire dependent ecosystems to proper functioning and to reduce hazardous fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Fire ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, sylvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Fire ManagementEcologyTake timely actions to restore proper functioning of ecosystems after wildfire.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Fire ManagementPreparednessIncrease public understanding and support of the active use of fire to improve watershed and habitat conditions and reduce fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyFire is returned to habitats from which it had been unnaturally excluded, the fire regime (frequency and intensity) in these habitats generally approximates a natural, pre-settlement regime.Utah Wildlife Action Plan190
Fire ManagementEcologyInappropriate Fire Frequency and Intensity - Fire is excluded from habitats in which potential burns now would be frequent, large, and destructive to soils and native vegetation to the habitats are being actively managed (treated) to reduce components or factors that promote risk of catastrophic fire, such as cheatgrass, excessive conifer encroachment, or unnaturally large stands of mature Gambel oakUtah Wildlife Action Plan188
Fire ManagementDevelopment layout and design should take
into consideration the risks associated with wildfires.
Snyderville Basin General Plan23
Fire ManagementThe fuel management aspect of the fire management program is emphasized through application of hazard reduction activities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42405
Fire ManagementFire is managed in an economically efficient manner, based on resource values and risks to human life and property.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42405
Fire ManagementFire is reintroduced as an ecosystem function to move landscapes toward desired conditions.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42405
Fire ManagementPriorities to protect property and natural/cultural resources are determined based on relative values to be protected, fire management costs, and risks to human (including firefighter) safety.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42405
Fire ManagementSound fuel load management techniques shall be used to minimize fire potential at the urban interface and prevent catastrophic events.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Fire ManagementCoordinate the development and implementation of appropriate
fire management regulations, procedures, and programs.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42435
Fire ManagementCoordinate the development and implementation of appropriate
fire management regulations, strategies, and programs.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42439
Fire ManagementThe different landscapes found within the county have become dependent upon fire to maintain the health and vigor of the many ecosystems. With the advent of fire suppression, many ecosystems have departed from pre-suppression conditions. As a result, when fires occur they are often more damaging and cause greater adverse impacts to soil, wildlife habitat, recreational resources, and watersheds.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment11
Fire Management(Guideline) - Wildland fire use is authorized Forestwide except in: administrative sites; developed recreation sites; summer home sites; designated communication sites; oil and gas facilities; mining facilities; above-ground utility corridors; high-use travel corridors. The management response for these locations will be suppression if they are threatened. In areas authorized for wildland fire use, the full range of management responses, from full suppression to monitoring, may be used.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-43
Amend_15
Fire Management1) Maintain fuel conditions which permit fire suppression forces to meet protection objectives for the management unit.
(Guideline) - Reduce hazardous fuels. The full range of fuel reduction methods is authorized, consistent with Forest and Management Area emphasis and direction.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-43
Amend_15
Fire Management1) Provide a level of protection from wildfire that is cost-efficient and that should meet objectives of the management unit considering the following:
A. The values of the resources that are threatened by fire.
B. The probability of fire occurrence,
C. The fuelbed that fires will probably occur in,
D. The weather conditions that will probably influence fires that occur.
E. The costs of fire protection programs (FFP AND FFF).
F. The environmental, social, economic, political, public safety, cultural, and property concerns; and
G. Management objectives for the areas.
(Standard) - Human life (firefighter and public safety) is the highest priority during a fire. Once firefighters have been assigned to a fire, their safety becomes the highest value to be protected. Property and natural and cultural resources are lower priorities.
(Guideline) - When assigning protection priorities to property and natural and cultural resources, decisions will be based on the relative values to be protected, commensurate with fire management costs.
(Standard) - Human-caused fires (either accidental or arson) are unwanted wildland fires, and will be suppressed. Natural ignitions will be suppressed in areas not covered by an approved fire management plan.
(Guideline) - The full range of suppression tactics is appropriate to consider Forestwide, consistent with Forest and Management Area emphasis and direction.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-42
Amend_15
Fire Management1) Use preplanned prescribed fire resulting from planned or unplanned ignitions to accomplish resource management objectives, such as reducing fuel load buildup, range or wildlife habitat improvement, etc.
(Guideline) - Prescribed fire is authorized Forestwide. (Use prescribed fire in wilderness only to meet wilderness management objectives).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-43
Amend_15
Fire ManagementWildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
(Guideline) Use prescribed fire in wilderness only to meet wilderness management objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_15
Fire ManagementDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Control wildfires at all intensity levels.
(Guideline) - Wildland fire use is not appropriate in the DRS management unit. The appropriate management response will be suppression.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-50
Amend_15
Fire ManagementFuelsReduce the accumulated fuels to a tolerable risk level.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Fire ManagementLivestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
2) Use mechanical, chemical, prescribed fire, or wildland fire use in combination with harvest methods as appropriate to alter timber stands and increase herbaceous yield or cover.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_15
Fire ManagementRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Take appropriate suppression action that meets the management objectives for the area, using confinement, containment, and/or control suppression strategies.
(Guideline) Wildland fire suppression, wildland fire use, and prescribed fire must be consistent with the purpose for which the area was established. Wildland fire use and prescribed fire may be used to preserve a vegetative type when absolutely necessary and then with extreme caution.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_15
Fire ManagementRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Restrict mechanical fireline construction.
(Guideline) Restrict heavy equipment line construction in riparian areas. Avoid aquatic and riparian ecosystems with this equipment.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_15
Fire ManagementSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
(Guideline) Wildland fire use is not appropriate in the SLD management unit. The appropriate management response will be suppression.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_15
Fire ManagementSuppressionSuppress wildfire based on values, risk, and management unit prescriptions.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Fire ManagementCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
(Guideline) Wildland fire use is not appropriate near above ground facilities in the UC management unit. The appropriate management response will be suppression.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_15
FisheriesHabitatThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
FisheriesInvasive Speciesimprove the ability of natural resource management entities within Utah to prevent invasion of AIS into the state, and to contain AIS through accepted management practices to areas that are either already infested or become infested.Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan18
FisheriesInvasive SpeciesThe Utah AIS Management Plan will establish and increase outreach efforts directed at public education. The intent is so Utah’s public, particularly the media, governmental agencies, outdoor-associated recreational organizations, boaters, and anglers will realize the threats and impacts from AIS, and become partners in AIS education, interdiction, decontamination, and management.Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan19
FisheriesInvasive SpeciesThe Utah AIS Management Plan will facilitate increased interdictions of boats and equipment contaminated with AIS, requiring decontamination under authority of the Utah Aquatic Invasive Species
Interdiction Act and Rule R657-60 Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction in order to control the spread of AIS
Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan21
FisheriesInvasive Speciesfacilitate opportunity to apply contemporary natural resource management practices in order to regulate, control and eradicate AIS, allowing rehabilitation of infested areas followed by documented monitoring of success in all phases of management.Utah Aquatic Invasive Management Plan22
FisheriesBarriersNative fishes are able to move past water-­‐diversion barriers where necessary or desired.Utah Wildlife Action Plan203
FisheriesBarriersNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
FisheriesBarriersNative fishes are able to move past water‐diversion barriers where necessary or desired.Utah Wildlife Action Plan203
FisheriesFlowsEstablish water allocation policies protecting sufficient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem for aquatic key habitats (especially those with occurrences of SGCNs).Utah Wildlife Action Plan198
FisheriesFlowsNatural hydrographs (timing, duration, temperature, etc) are restored or mimicked in priority stream reaches below dams and reservoirs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan205
FisheriesHabitatAquatic key habitats (especially at those locations important for SGCNs) contain sufficient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem that supports the conservation target(s).Utah Wildlife Action Plan196
FisheriesHabitatComplex habitats and floodplain connections are restored or maintained in selected rivers/streams.Utah Wildlife Action Plan199
FisheriesStreams are managed to provide self-sustaining fisheries by ensuring that sufficient habitat and water flow are available to support all life stages of native and desired non-native aquatic species. Where streams are managed to provide a recreational fishery, sufficient habitat is maintained to ensure that the stream’s recreational values are maintained.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42407
FisheriesProtect and maintain 10 conservation populations, 12 persistence populations, and one metapopulation (consisting of six waterbodies in the Diamond Fork drainage) of Bonneville cutthroat trout within the Utah Lake/Provo River drainage of the Northern Bonneville Geographic Management Unit (GMU)Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42407
FisheriesProvide and maintain habitat to support native fish populations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
FisheriesLand management agencies shall make every effort to provide additional opportunities for fishing on public lands in Wasatch County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
FisheriesProtect or enhance the quality of the fisheries and fish habitat within the
framework of existing laws and management authority.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
FisheriesCoordinate annual reservoir operations with the UDWR to identify
possible fishery enhancement opportunities.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
FisheriesRecommend appropriate development criteria for improving fish
habitat.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
FisheriesCoordinate with appropriate agencies (e.g., UDWR, State Parks) to
prevent invasive aquatic species.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
FisheriesRequire mandatory boat inspection for aquatic invasive species and
provide boat decontamination station and trained technician.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
FloodplainsNatural functionManagement actions within floodplains and wetlands will include measures to preserve, protect, and if necessary, restore their natural functions.BLM Pony Express RMP31
FloodplainsFloodplains: All areas within a 100-year floodplain, or where the prevailing or potential natural vegetation is riparian, are declared to be critical to the maintenance of the basins hydrologic systems, fisheries and wildlife habitat. Development of floodplain areas has a significant potential to adversely affect wildlife, water quality, and, if it modifies the floodway, adjoining, upstream and downstream properties, roads and other public facilities. Development in floodplain areas may also be constrained by a high water table which raises the cost of installing and maintaining utilities. Finally, floodplain development adversely affects all taxpayers through public expenditures to prevent or clean up damages due to floods.Snyderville Basin General Plan20
FloodplainsSufficient vegetation is left on channel banks to catch sediments necessary for streambank maintenance and floodplain development.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42402
FloodplainsWhere practical, streams have access to their floodplains during spring runoff, on average, two out of every three years. Stream channel width to depth ratios, entrenchment ratios, and sinuosity are within expected norms for the appropriate channel type.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42403
FloodplainsDevelopment patterns should provide for, and preserve access to, adjacent waterways for flood mitigation and maintenance work, erosion control, and related water control, water management, and water damage mitigation activities.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
FloodplainsProhibit structures within 100 feet of an active stream or in a designated FEMA flood way unless the foundation is constructed at least one foot above the 100 year flood level.Wasatch County General Plan66
FloodplainsConsultation with PRWUA could provide helpful information as they
have developed and are implementing an upper Provo River
maintenance program to help mitigate flood impacts above the
Jordanelle Reservoir.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
Floodplains3) Flood plains should be identified and, as appropriate, a risk/hazard analysis performed for project sites where long-term occupancy is proposed.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Floodplains4) Protect present and necessary future facilities that cannot be located out of the 100-year floodplain by structural mitigation (deflection structures, riprap, etc.).
a. Implement mitigation measures when present or unavoidable future facilities are located in active floodplain to ensure that public and facility safety requirements, State water quality standards, sediment threshold limits, bank stability criteria, flood hazard reduction and instream flow standards are met during and immediately after construction.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Obtain 404 permits when needed for proposed activities causing disturbance to floodplains and wetlands.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-71
Forest ManagementProductsAll other areas of juniper forest on public land within the Pony Express Resource Area shall remain open to harvesting of firewood, fence posts, Christmas trees or any other juniper products as defined in the Tooele County Woodland Management Plan and the Utah Supplemental Guidance: Management of Woodland Resources.BLM Pony Express RMP55
Forest ManagementProductsHarvest of firewood, fence posts and Christmas trees shall not be authorized in crucial deer winter range during the period of December 1 to April 30.BLM Pony Express RMP55
Forest ManagementProductsHarvest of saw timber for commercial or individual use shall not be allowed anywhere on public land within the Pony Express Resource Area except for maintenance practices such as thinning, disease control, wildlife improvements, and watershed enhancement.BLM Pony Express RMP55
Forest ManagementProductsThe harvest of pinyon pine for use as Christmas trees, either commercially or individually, shall be at the discretion of the Authorized Officer. These stands will be managed as outlined in the Utah Supplemental Guidance: Management of Woodland Resources.BLM Pony Express RMP55
Forest ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, sylvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain and/or restore tall forb communities to mid seral or potential natural community (PNC) status.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore as mature and old age classes 40% of total conifer and 30% of total aspen cover types, well distributed across the landscape.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore species composition, such that the species that occupy any given site are predominantly native species in the kind and amount that were historically distributed across the landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Forest ManagementProductsUse timber harvest where allowed, to contribute to the economy while achieving properly functioning conditions of vegetation and watersheds.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Forest ManagementVegetation surrounding mine or cave openings is maintained to protect the mine or cave’s microenvironment.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42405
Forest ManagementEcosystem resilience is maintained by providing for a full range of seral stages and age classes (by cover type) that achieve a mosaic of habitat conditions and diversity to meet a variety of desired resource management objectives. Recruitment and sustainability of some early seral species and vegetation communities in the landscape are necessary to maintain ecosystem resilience to perturbations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Forest ManagementMaintain adequate distribution of old growth in forested community types. Maintain at least 10 percent of each forest vegetation type in an old growth condition as defined in the Forest Service publication, Characteristics of Old Growth Forests in the Intermountain Region (USDA 1993), or subsequently modified Regional Forester-approved definition. Ensure the presence through time by providing for suitable and potential replacement areas.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Forest ManagementManagement actions maintain ecosystem health and encourage conditions that are within the historic range of variation. Management actions remain within the variability of size, intensity, and frequency of native disturbance regimes characteristic of the subject landscape and ecological processes.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Forest ManagementKey shrubs and/or trees are maintained to a level that allows adequate recruitment to maintain or recover the woody component. Specifically, the Forest is managed for more plants in the combined sprout and young categories than in the combined mature and dead categories.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Forest ManagementIntegrated pest management systems and strategies that provide protection of forest resources with the least hazard to humans and the environment are developed, practiced, and encouraged.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
Forest ManagementReclamation activities are designed to provide for achieving desired future conditions for the management area(s) involved.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42412
Forest ManagementReclamation activities:
a. Stabilize the area,
b. Protect the aesthetics of the area,
c. Prevent water from off-site sources from impacting the disturbed area,
d. Control surface runoff to minimize erosion,
e. Trap sediment to enhance establishment of vegetation,
f. Restore and stabilize all unnecessary roads,
g. Include revegetation seeding or planting of local native species, and, where needed, fertilization and replacement of topsoil on all disturbed areas,
h. Provide maintenance of repeat applications where initial treatments do not achieve objectives, and
i. Prevent subsequent pollution from the site.
Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42412
Forest ManagementSylvicultural treatments are utilized to manage forested vegetation to provide for an ecologically sustainable (i.e., within a range of natural variability) mix of wildlife habitats, old growth and other late successional stages, recreational opportunities, and wood products for both commercial and personal use (e.g., personal use permits for the gathering of fuelwood, Christmas trees, tree seedling transplants, and miscellaneous other products).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42416
Forest ManagementAn annual and sustainable program of commercial timber sales is offered. The Forest contributes to the sustaining of local lifestyles and economies.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42416
Forest ManagementThe Jumpoff Research Natural Area (RNA) maintains the subalpine fir, climax aspen, mountain brush, and sagebrush steppe ecosystems for which it was designated.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42424
Forest ManagementThe Diamond Fork Youth Forest provides an area for youth to investigate, study, interact with natural resource managers, and engage in management of our natural resources.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42424
Forest ManagementAll forestlands shall be managed for multiple use and sustained yield. Ensure realistic targets are established and outputs are sustainable over the long-term.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementForest management plans shall be written and effective management techniques adopted to promote a stable forest economy and enhanced forest health, in accordance with the National Healthy Forest Initiative. (Act of 2003, P.L. 108-148) Efficient and effective use of National Environmental Policy Act Documentation for limited timber harvest will be encouraged. Use of Interim Directive (ID) 1909.15 – 2003-2 will be encouraged for timber harvest projects that do not require further analysis and may be categorically excluded as outlined in categories 12, 13 & 14 of said ID.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementOpportunities for harvesting forest products shall be promoted.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementManagement strategies shall protect timber and adverse impacts to other resources from the devastating effects of fire (in accordance with the National Fire Plan and the National Healthy Forest Initiative), insects, disease, wind throw, blow down, ice storms, or imminent risk of such epidemics because of conditions on adjacent land.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementHarvesting techniques shall be employed that will prevent waste of forest products.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementForest management techniques shall be implemented that will maintain or enhance watershed health and long-term water quantity, yield and quality.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest ManagementManagement programs must provide opportunities for citizens to harvest forest products for personal needs, economic value and forest health.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Forest Management1) Combine appropriate management activities for the timber type to provide the acceptable range of management intensity for timber production.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-26
Forest Management1) Establish a satisfactory stand on cutover areas, emphasizing natural regeneration within five years after final harvest except:
A. For permanent openings that serve specific management objectives; or
B. When provided for otherwise in specific management prescriptions.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-29
Forest Management1) Manage timberlands suitable for commercial harvest for timber or wood fiber productions.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-25
Forest Management1) Utilize Christmas tree or other product sales and thinning for stocking control where the opportunity exists.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-30
Forest Management2) Do not apply final shelterwood removal cut until the desired number (as specified in minimum stocking standards of well-established seedling/acre are expected to remain following overwood removal.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-30
Forest ManagementWildlife2) Manage non-commercial aspen stands in mixed age groups to provide a source of forage.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-23
Forest ManagementForage2) Perpetuate non-commercial aspen communities as a forage source.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-24
Forest Management2) Provide for timber stand improvement, reforestation in sale area improvement plans, and wildlife habitat improvement.
a. Timber stands suitable for harvest:
(1) Produce 20 cu.ft. or more per acre per year.
(2) Are capable of being restocked within five years.
(3) Can be harvested within the General Direction, Standards & Guidelines for the site of the stand.
(4) Generally include ponderosa pine, mixed conifer, aspen, and spruce fir types, and rarely oak or pinyon-juniper
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-25
Forest Management2) Sylvicultural treatments will normally begin after the stand density index (SDI) reaches the lower management level and will be completed prior to reaching the upper management level.
a. Lower management level SDI is start of root or crown competition. Upper management level SDI is start of imminent mortality zone.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Forest Management3) Manage timberlands not suitable for commercial harvest to maintain forest cover species, but emphasis should be on production of other forest resources and uses.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-25
Forest Management3) Management timber product removal and utilization to meet Forest multiple use requirements.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-28
Forest Management3) When supplemental planting, use trees of the best genetic quality available which are adapted to the planting site (FSM 2475).Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-30
Forest Management4) Require those authorized to conduct activities to replace losses through appropriate mitigations where a site-specific development adversely affects long-term production or management.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-25
Forest ManagementWildlife4) Use both commercial and non-commercial sylvicultural practices to accomplish wildlife habitat objectives.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-23
Forest ManagementThreatened, Endangered, and Sensitive Species5) Maintain a medium to high edge contrast between tree stands created by even-aged management.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-23
Forest Management5) Perpetuate Aspen communities through sylvicultural treatments:
A. Stands suitable for commercial harvest should be managed for aspen timber production.
a. No more than 12% of the total aspen acreage suitable for commercial harvest can be treated in a ten year period except in an accelerated harvest where up to 50% of the volume may be removed in a 10 year period.
b. Stands managed for commercial timber may be treated by thinning, weeding, chaining, burning, or spraying when conifer encroachment approaches 20% of crown cover, or the stand is reaching decadence and harvest is not possible within 5 years.
B. Stands not suitable for commercial harvest should be managed for range forage and/or wildlife habitat.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-29
Forest Management5) Use clearcuts as appropriate on any forest cover type with potential for impact, or impacted by insects or disease.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-25
Forest ManagementLand Access6) Coordinate timber and fuelwood programs to take advantage of roads constructed for other resource development or use.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-25
Forest Management7) Assure that even-aged conifer stands scheduled to be harvested during the planning period will generally have reached the culmination of mean annual increment of growth.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-26
Forest ManagementWildlife7) Manage down timber to provide habitat for wildlife.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-22
Forest Management8) Make Christmas trees available in areas where Christmas tree culture or other resource objectives can be accomplished through commercial or personal use Christmas tree sales.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-26
Forest ManagementWater QualityC. Logging or wood product removal requirements to assure controlling soil erosion within acceptable levels.
a. On slopes less than 20% allow conventional logging systems and equipment where soil surveys or soil data are unavailable.
b. On slopes less than 40% allow conventional logging systems and equipment where soil surveys or soil data are available to design erosion mitigation needs.
c. Utilize high floatation equipment on slopes up to 60% or cable or aerial systems on any slope.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-28
Forest ManagementLand Accessc) Where timber harvest is prescribed to achieve desired forest conditions, plan the transportation system to minimize disturbance to the PFAs. For example, small permanent skid trails should be used in lieu of roads to minimize disturbance in goshawk PFAs. Variance may occur if it is determined that a combination of new permanent or temporary roads and permanent skid trails would result in less overall disturbance to PFA habitat.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Forest ManagementWildlifed. (Guideline) When initiating vegetative management treatments in forested cover types, provide for a full range of seral stages, by forested cover type, that achieve a mosaic of habitat conditions and diversity. Each seral stage should contain a strong representation of early seral tree species. Recruitment and sustainability of early seral tree species in the landscape is needed to maintain ecosystem resilience to perturbations.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Forest ManagementWildlifee. (Guideline) Planned vegetative management treatments (excluding unplanned and unwanted wildland fire) in the mature and/or old structural groups in a landscape that is at or below the desired percentage of land area in mature and old structural stages (40% conifer, 30% aspen), should be designed to maintain or enhance the characteristics of these structural stages. Within these landscapes the percentage of land area in mature and old structural stages treated should not move out of the mature and old structural stages. Planned treatments may vary from this guideline if the action was assessed through the biological evaluation (BE) process, and the BE concluded that the action is consistent with the intent of the Conservation Strategy and Agreement for Management of the Northern Goshawk in Utah.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Forest ManagementEmphasis is on management for the production and use of wood-fiber for a variety of wood products. The harvest methods by Forest cover type are single tree and group selection and shelterwood in Engelmann spruce-subalpine fire, Douglas-fire, ponderosa pine, mixed conifers, and clearcutting in aspen. Harvesting will be accomplished with methods including cable, conventional crawler tractor, or rubber-tired skidders. Precommercial thinning and intermediate harvest will be used to increase or maintain fiber production.
Dispersed recreation opportunities vary between semiprimitive non-motorized and roaded natural appearing.
Wildlife habitat diversity may be enhanced by vegetative manipulation. Livestock grazing may be permitted. This prescription could alter water yield through vegetation management, as well as decreased evapotranspiration and maximize snow retention in small openings on low energy slopes.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-67
Forest ManagementEnsure that programmed reforestation is kept current.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Forest Managementf. (Guideline) When initiating vegetative management treatments in forested cover types, leave the following minimum number and size of snags. If the minimum number of snags is unavailable, green trees should be substituted. If the minimum size is unavailable, then use largest tree available on site. It is desirable to have snags represented in all size classes above the minimum available on the site. The number of snags should be present at the stand level on average and where they are available, distributed over each treated 100 acres. The distribution is needed to meet the needs of prey species that utilize this habitat.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Forest ManagementWildlifeg. (Guideline) When initiating vegetative management treatments, prescriptions should be designed to retain the following minimum amount and size of down logs and woody debris. These habitat components should be present at the stand level on average and, where they are available, distributed over each treated 10 acres. This distribution is needed to meet the needs of prey species that utilize this habitat.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Forest ManagementWildlifeh. (Guideline) Vegetative treatments designed to maintain or promote a VSS 4, 5, and/or 6 group, the percent of the group acreage covered by clumps of trees with interlocking crowns should typically range from 40-70% in post-fledgling and foraging areas, and 50-70% in nest areas. To manage outside this range, it should be shown either that the range is not within PFC for the site and the biological evaluation process determines that managing outside the range will be consistent with landscape needs of the goshawk and its prey. Use the best information available and deemed most reliable to make determinations. Groups are made up of multiple clumps of trees. Groups should be of a size and distribution in a landscape that is consistent with disturbance patterns defined in Regional or local proper functioning condition assessments (PFC). Clumps typically have 2 to 9 trees in the VSS 4, 5, or 6 size class with interlocking crowns.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Forest ManagementWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Forest habitat types within this unit will be managed to provide big-game forage, thermal cover, and security in association with the other vegetative habitat types.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-59
Forest ManagementMaintain a healthy Forest by applying appropriate sylvicultural treatments.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Forest ManagementManage aspen stand for forage as well as wood fiber.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Forest ManagementMeet as much of the demand for wood fiber and Forest products as possible, consistent with multiple-use objectives.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Forest ManagementWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Provide for harvest of forest products when the activity would improve water production and/or does not adversely affect water quality.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-75
Forest ManagementWildlifep. (Standard) Prohibit forest vegetative manipulation (timber harvest, prescribed burning, fuel wood, thinnings, weedings, etc.) within active nest areas (approximately 30 acres; i.e. Guideline n.) during the active nesting period. The active nesting period will normally occur between March 1st and September 30th. For non-vegetative manipulation activities (such as road maintenance, oil and gas exploration, recreation sites, etc.) adjacent to a new nest site, or a new activity adjacent to an established nest, Guideline q. applies.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Forest ManagementProvide a stable supply of fuelwood opportunities.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Forest ManagementProvide commercial timber sales of sufficient quantity and quality to maintain local timber industry and accomplish desired vegetation treatment goals.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Forest ManagementProvide wood products usage in the management of pinyon-juniper and oak stands.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Forest ManagementLivestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
1) Maintain and manage non-commercial forested inclusions to provide a high level of forage production, wildlife habitat, and diversity.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-65
Forest ManagementLivestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
3) Manage aspen stands or mixed fir habitat types at the appropriate ecological stage that provides high herbaceous yield and cover.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-65
Forest ManagementRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Prohibit any timber management activities that would impair research, educational values, or otherwise reduce the value of the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-85
Forest ManagementRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Manage forest cover types to perpetuate tree cover and provide healthy stands, high water quality, and wildlife and fish habitat.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Forest ManagementRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Avoid locating log landing and decking areas within the riparian unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Forest ManagementSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) On potential units manage forest cover types consistent or compatible with prescription from adjacent management units unless a specific use requires special forest cover management.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-93
Forest ManagementRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Manage tree stands using commercial or noncommercial methods to maintain or enhance recreation opportunities, visual quality, visitor safety or control insects and disease.
a. Commercial timber sales will not be scheduled within SPR units during the period 1986 through 1995.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Amend_02
Forest ManagementRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
2) Use mechanical, chemical, prescribed fire, or wildland fire use to alter or perpetuate timber stands and increase herbaceous yield or cover as appropriate in areas where harvest methods are impractical or demand does not exist.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Amend_15
Forest ManagementCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
1) Manage forest cover types to be compatible with prescriptions from adjacent management units unless a specific use requires special forest cover management.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-96
Forest ManagementCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
2) Utilize forest products through both commercial and noncommercial methods.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-96
Forest ManagementRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Manage tree stands using commercial or noncommercial methods to maintain or enhance recreation values, visual quality, visitor safety, or control insects and disease.
a. Tree Hazards: Recognition and Reduction in Recreation Sites Technical Report R2-1 (1981).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Forest ManagementRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
2) Implement vegetation plans in Level 2 development sites.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Forest ManagementRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
3) Plant new trees to provide desired cover when natural reproduction is insufficient.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-54
Forest ManagementUse timber management to meet other management or resource needs.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
IrrigationPromote advanced irrigation techniques, including the
use of wastewater on golf courses and other large irrigated areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
IrrigationAreas served by irrigation systems should be safeguarded from non-farm development and the irrigation infrastructure protected.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
IrrigationThe irrigation and canal delivery systems of Utah County should efficiently be utilized.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Land AccessPlanningThe Central Wasatch transportation system is integrated within the fabric of community values and lifestyle choices, supports land use objectives, and connects to the overall regional network. We meet the growing demand for access to and within the Central Wasatch Mountains through a dynamic and sustainable multi-modal mountain transportation system that provides year-round transportation choices to residents, visitors and employees, improves safety and efficiency, and is compatible with the unique environmental characteristics of the Central Wasatch.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics5
Land AccessPlanningProvide integrated multimodal transportation choices for residents, visitors, and employees.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics5
Land AccessPlanningEnsure the transportation experience is reliable and facilitates a positive experience.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics5
Land AccessPlanningEnsure the transportation experience is safe and promotes health.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics5
Land AccessPlanningThe transportation system supports the natural and intrinsic values of the Central Wasatch.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics5
Land AccessRecreationPursue the most appropriate and feasible means of securing legal public access to critical recreational opportunities while mitigating conflicts on privately-owned landsMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics6
Land AccessRecreationEstablish appropriate levels of access and designed settings in harmony with the desired recreation experience.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics6
Land AccessPlanningAcquire access and rights-of-way for general public and administrative use.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land AccessPlanningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land AccessPlanningMinimize the addition of special use encumbered areas of National Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land AccessPlanningProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Land AccessRight of WayEfforts will be made to obtain right-of-ways for public access to the National Forest. Existing right-of ways will be maintained. A priority for right-of-ways will be the linkages to community trails along the front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-135
Land AccessRight of WayRegional trails, such as the Great Western Trail and the Bonneville Shoreline Trail will be recognized and valued as unique opportunities to develop recreation corridors across multiple ownerships in the face of expanding development across potential trail corridors.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-160
Land AccessRight of WayOgden area in cooperation with the cities of North Ogden, Pleasant View and Willard. Needed access and rights of way will be maintained or acquired to complete the Bonneville Shoreline trail along the Wasatch Front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-146
Land AccessPreserve and create appropriate motorized and non-motorized trails and access to
public land in conjunction with the municipalities and US Forest Service. The
intention is not to require property owners who live adjacent to the National Forest to
provide public access.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Land AccessThe County recognizes the importance of the natural resources within
the Basin and the surrounding areas and desires to preserve and maintain access to
these scenic areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Land AccessPreserve public access to riparian corridors and fishable streams,
including East Canyon Creek and Silver Creek Drainage (post remediation), for
fishing, bird watching, wildlife viewing, and other passive recreational interests.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Land AccessEncourage and obtain access to the forest lands to promote hiking,
mountain biking, bird watching, wildlife viewing and other similar non-motorized
activities. All new development adjacent to these areas should ensure appropriate
access to the back country through trail connections and open space view
corridors. All new development adjacent to these areas should ensure appropriate
access to the back country through trail connections and open space view
corridors. Provide adequate trailheads and parking to facilitate resident and visitor
access to these backcountry areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Land AccessPromote and encourage horseback riding and other equestrian
uses. Equestrian trails should be designed to avoid “land locking” horse owners
and provide them with trail access to appropriate areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan18
Land AccessThe inclusion of forest access in city and county land use planning is encouraged.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42420
Land AccessAppropriate access on established travel routes to the Forest boundary is assured through coordination with local jurisdictions. These travel routes include, but are not limited to, Rock Canyon, Slate Canyon, Battle Creek, Grove Creek, Nebo Creek, Bennie Creek, and White River (Left and Right Forks).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42421
Land AccessA safe, effective, and economical transportation system is planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide appropriate access associated with movement of people and materials to and through the Forest, and to support movement of materials associated with management, use, and administration of the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42421
Land AccessThe existing transportation systems are managed and maintained in an environmentally sensitive manner. The Forest will continue to look for opportunities to realign transportation systems to reduce impacts on the environment, particularly out of riparian areas to upland areas.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42421
Land AccessRoads and trails are managed to protect or minimize impacts on resources.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Land AccessNon-beneficial and/or unauthorized roads and trails are decommissioned, obliterated, or rehabilitated if they do not meet resource objectives or provide necessary access to facilities or inholdings.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Land AccessA minimum number of Forest Service roads and trails are developed, maintained, and managed to respond to resource management objectives. Many road-related activities occur in support of timber management, dispersed and developed recreation uses, range, administration, and resource protection (including fire).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Land AccessAn inventory of classified roads is maintained.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Land AccessAn analysis and determination of the management objectives for unclassified roads is completed concurrent with landscape assessments or site-specific project development and analysis.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42422
Land AccessAccess to and across public lands, including RS 2477 Roads and rights-of-way should remain open and maintained to allow safe and reliable public access.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAll necessary action will be taken to protect access. The county will identify and inventory roads and participate with federal and state land management agencies in decision-making regarding site-specific management.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAccess and transportation needs shall be considered, evaluated and analyzed in the land use planning process in order to accommodate and be consistent with other uses. No roads, trails, rights-of-way, easements or other traditional access for the transportation of people, products, recreation, energy or livestock may be closed, abandoned, withdrawn, or have a change of use without full public disclosure and analysis.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessFuture access needs must be planned and analyzed to determine the disposition of the road at the completion of its intended life. This is to ensure that needed access is maintained or that such access is removed and resulting disturbances reclaimed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAccess to all water related facilities such as dams, reservoirs, delivery systems, monitoring facilities, communication sites, etc., must be maintained. This access must be economically feasible with respect to the method and timing of such access.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessIt is expected that the Federal and State Agencies will conform to the transportation provisions of the Resource Management Plan to be consistent with the [Wasatch County] General Plan maps, as required by FLPMA Section 1712(c)(9). It is also expected that when such mapping is completed for areas under the stewardship of the United States Forest Service, the Forest Service will conform the transportation provisions of its forest plans to be consistent with such maps.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessTitle V rights-of-way on public lands are granted in perpetuity and do not diminish any RS 2477 claim or right-of-way.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessAccess to and through public lands is essential to healthy recreation and tourism within the County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land AccessProvide for convenient, manageable, and controlled public access
to the recreational facilities, the reservoir, and the Weber River.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Land AccessMaintain appropriate and reasonable access for existing private
landowners and visitors.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42439
Land AccessProvide Appropriate and Safe Access to Public Use AreasJordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42467
Land AccessAccess must continue to be restricted in the Primary Jurisdiction Zone
or other areas that could compromise public or facility safety.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42468
Land AccessRestrict access that would compromise water quality or any of the
other purposes of the reservoir.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42468
Land Access1) Acquire rights-of-way for Forest Development Roads and Trails that cross private land.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-37
Land Access1) Close newly constructed intermittent local roads to the public after initial intended use is completed when:
A. The establishment of public use is undesirable.
B. The road is unsafe for public travel.
C. Management direction has previously been established to close the road.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-39
Land Access1) Construct and reconstruct local roads to provide access for specific resource activities such as campgrounds, trailheads, timber sales, range allotments, leases, etc., with the minimum amount surface disturbance and fitting the road to the topography.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-41
Land Access1) Construct or reconstruct trails when needed as part of the transportation system.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-42
Land Access1) Maintain roads to minimum requirements as follows:
A. All arterials - Level 3;
B. All open collectors - Level 2/3;
C. All open local roads - Level 2; and
D. All closed roads - Level 1.
b. Level 1 maintenance include upkeep of drainage structures and vegetation cover necessary to prevent erosion.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-42
Land Access1) Maintain trails for designated uses and close trails to inappropriate uses.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-42
Land Access2) Allow commercial or permitted use on Forest Development Roads under the following conditions:
A. Use is compatible with existing road standards, designs and public safety and user provide commensurate share of road maintenance.
B. User reconstructs the road to incorporate both existing and proposed traffic and provides commensurate share of road maintenance.
C. If the road meets design standards but the combined use does not fulfill public safety requirements due to volume of traffic, the road may be administratively managed to control conflicting traffic, unsafe conditions, or traffic flows.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-39
Land Access2) Construct temporary roads for specific resource activities such as timber sales, emergencies, (e.g., fire suppression), or mineral exploration.
c. Temporary roads shall be returned to resource production and use compatible with the management unit emphasis, and within one season after termination of the activity for which the road was constructed.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-41
Land Access2) Maintain structures, bridges, cattleguards, etc., to be structurally sound and safe for use.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-42
Land Access2) Provide a range of trail opportunities in coordination with other Federal, State, or local agencies, and private industry both on and off NFS lands.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-42
Land Access3) Classify areas as to whether vehicular travel use is restricted.
a. Specify vehicular travels restrictions, if any, based on vehicle travel use management.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-18
Land Access3) Encourage the development of Forest Development Roads, when constructed or reconstructed for special purposes to meet existing and potential all purpose needs.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-39
Land Access4) Put roads under special-use permit or easement that are needed for the benefit of private uses, and are not needed for public travel or the administration of Forest resources.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-39
Land Access5) Consider turning existing Forest Development Roads over to county or State jurisdiction when:
A. The use is predominately to serve non-Forest resources ,or
B. The road better compliments county or State jurisdiction than Forest administration, or
C. Little or no future Forest need for the management of Forest resources is perceived, or
D. The road is of such high standards that established Forest maintenance is difficult or impossible.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-39
Land Access6) Close Forest Development Roads when unacceptable environmental or road damage is occurring for other road use.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Land Access7) Where possible, establish cost and commensurate share agreements for access roads constructed for other resource uses.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Land Access9) Coordinate transportation planning for Forest Development Roads with Forest Trails to provide continuity and fulfill Forest transportation needs.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Land AccessAcquire necessary rights-of-way to facilitate pubic access to National Forest System lands and to meet resource management objectives.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Land AccessWildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Convert roads not needed for authorized activities to trails, or restore the road area to the predisturbed conditions.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-90
Land AccessWildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
2) Construct or reconstruct and maintain trails only when needed to meet wilderness objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-91
Land AccessRecreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Design, construct, and maintain roads to assure they are compatible insofar as possible with developed recreation sites use unit objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-50
Land AccessWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Allow new roads to meet management needs. Obliterate and rehabilitate temporary toads within one season after planned use ends.
a. New roads may be constructed when;
(1) There is no acceptable alternative to build the road outside the unit, and the road is essential to achieve priority goals and objectives of contiguous management units, or to provide access to land administered by other government agencies or to contiguous private land.
(2) Winter road use will not significantly disturb wintering big-game animals.
(3) Roads cross the winter range in the minimum distance feasible to facilitate the needed use.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-63
Land AccessWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
2) Close and/or restrict road use as appropriate to reduce stress on big-game animals.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-63
Land AccessWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Use road or area closures to maintain habitat effectiveness.
a. Prohibit activities during critical periods of big-game use.
b. Approved activities must be short-term and prompt reclamation must be assured.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-60
Land AccessWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
2) Prohibit new permanent roads in the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-60
Land AccessWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
3) Allow short-term (temporary) roads where the use would not conflict with wintering big game.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-60
Land AccessFacilitiesManage the transportation system for increased cost-effectiveness and efficiency.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Land AccessManage the transportation system to safely and economically transport people, products, and services to accomplish planned management unit programs and goals.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Land AccessMineral ResourcesMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) Reduce or remove transportation facilities to a kind and standard compatible with the transportation section of the Forest Plan when mineral activity is complete and the unit is rehabilitated.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-82
Land AccessWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Allow new roads only if needed to meet MWS management emphasis or temporary roads to meet limited resource needs. Provide erosion protection on temporary roads before each winter season.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-76
Land AccessWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Close all or portions of the unit to vehicular travel except as authorized.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-75
Land AccessFacilitiesReduce total road miles while emphasizing improvement on remaining miles.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Land AccessRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Generally, transportation system facilities are permitted where the facility is compatible with the purpose for which the unit is established.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Land AccessRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Semiprimitive nonmotorized, semiprimitive motorized, roaded natural, and rural recreation opportunities may be provided.
a. Prohibit or restrict motorized vehicle use as appropriate.
b. Limit or restrict camping in existing or proposed units as necessary.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
Land AccessLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Where appropriate, develop trails for interpretation and/or self study.
a. Prohibit roads in Research Natural Areas.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Land AccessLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
2) Limit trails in RNAs to those needed for access to conduct research and for educational purposes.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Land AccessRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Locate new roads and trails outside riparian areas unless alternative routes have been reviewed and rejected.
a. Do not parallel streams when road location must occur in riparian areas except where absolutely necessary. Cross streams at points that best complement riparian and aquatic ecosystems as well as road and stream geometry. Locate crossing (fords) at points of low bank slope and firm surfaces.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-73
Land AccessRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Minimize detrimental disturbance to the riparian unit by construction and maintenance activities. Initiate timely and effective rehabilitation of disturbed sites and restore riparian areas so that a vegetation ground cover or suitable substitute protects the soil from erosion and prevents increased sediment yield.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-73
Land AccessRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Design and locate local roads and/or trails to minimum standards and to complement other resources and to facilitate final reclamation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Land AccessRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Trails design, construction, and maintenance will be compatible with semiprimitive recreation opportunities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Land AccessRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
2) Close and obliterate newly constructed or reconstructed short-term roads after initial intended use is complete in SPR units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Amend_02 _03
Land AccessRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
2) Manage National Recreation Trails to emphasize foot and horseback travel. Do not allow mechanized vehicle use.
a. The VQO for National Recreation Trails should be based on maintaining a recreation visitor Sensitivity Level 1 classification.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Land AccessForest ManagementTBR (Wood-fiber Production and Harvest) Management Area
1) Locate, design, and construct the minimum Forest Development Road necessary to provide a stable road base to serve short- and long- term timber needs, under the timber sale program.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-68
Land AccessForest ManagementTBR (Wood-fiber Production and Harvest) Management Area
2) To the extent possible, give emphasis to and coordinate road locations for timber sales that will benefit future fuelwood sales and other timber activities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-68
Land AccessCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
1) Avoid the establishment of service roads for maintenance.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-97
Land AccessCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
2) Restrict vehicular travel as appropriate.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-96
Land AccessRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Design, construct, and maintain roads to assure they are compatible insofar as possible with Undeveloped Motorized Recreation management unit objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-54
Land AccessRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
2) Close specific land areas or travel routes either permanently or seasonally to maintain compatibility with adjacent area management, or prevent resource damage, for economic reasons, to prevent conflicts of use, and provide for user health and safety.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Land AccessUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
3) Manage motorized vehicle use (including snowmobiles) on and off Forest Development Roads and Trails.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Land AccessWater QualityWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
2) Close treated or proposed watershed improvement areas to vehicular travel (except over snow).
a. Close to motorized vehicles as needed.
b. On units where structural watershed improvements have been made, vehicular travel use will be restricted (except over snow travel).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Land UseStandards/zoningIdentify lands of high public value, which include critical or crucial wildlife habitats, wilderness study areas, existing and proposed Areas of Critical Environmental Concern, significant water resources, recreation areas, highly scenic areas, and areas with facilities and improvements.BLM Pony Express RMP3
Land UseStandards/zoningStipulations for use of public lands for military exercisesBLM Pony Express RMP4
Land UseJurisdiction/exchangesAcquire lands where needed to increase management efficiency and administration of lands with high public values.BLM Pony Express RMP5
Land UseHazardous waste managementBLM will not authorize placement or processing of hazardous wastes on public lands.BLM Pony Express RMP29
Land UseHazardous waste managementEvaluate the known or unknown existing hazardous waste sites and take necessary actions as required by law.BLM Pony Express RMP29
Land UseVisual/aestheticsDesignate [all public lands in appropriate] visual resource management (VRM)
classes.
BLM Pony Express RMP41
Land UseJurisdiction/exchangesThe following areas will be designated as ACECs: Horseshoe Springs, North Stansbury Mountains, and the North Deep Creek Mountains if Congress does not designate the area wilderness.BLM Pony Express RMP51
Land UseUtility corridorsFuture proposals for major, rights-of-way such as pipelines, large power lines and permanent improved roads will, to the extent practical, utilize identified corridors and rights-of-way as shown in [Figure]. Otherwise, a planning amendment and appropriate environmental analysis will be required. Proposals that are not considered major may be sited outside existing corridors and rights-of-way after demonstrating that locating within a corridor or right-of-way is not viable. In all cases, the utilization of rights-of-way in common shall be considered whenever possible. Rights-of-way, whether within or outside a corridor, will avoid the following areas to the maximum extent possible: [identified in the plan]BLM Pony Express RMP56
Land UseJurisdiction/exchangesIdentify public lands available for disposal, available for exchange, and unavailable for disposal.BLM Pony Express RMP3
Land UseEcologyPreserve additional lands to avoid loss of critical conservation values, and restore existing degraded landsMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Land UseEcologyMitigate the severity of climate change and develop adaptive capacity to reduce vulnerabilities to local climate change impactsMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Land UseEconomic considerationsDevelop legal, regulatory, financial and integrated governance structures that provide long-term and sustainable support for achieving the environment system goals.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Land UseEconomic considerationsEstablish an organization, with authority to act based on public support, that fosters long-term success of the Central Wasatch recreation system by promoting collaborative and united management, user education, and acquisition of ongoing funding for continued system maintenance, evolution, and managementMountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics6
Land UseStandards/zoningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land UseUtility corridorsUtilize currently designated utility corridors fully for power transmission lines of 66kV or greater and oil and gas pipelines 10” or greater.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-25
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRecognize and manage for the importance of scenic forest landscapes to overall recreation settings as well as to the quality of life for communities adjacent to the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRestore, maintain or enhance landscape scenic integrity across the variety of landscape character themes found on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Land UseJurisdiction/exchangesupgrade school and institutional trust land assets where prudent by exchange.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitymanage school and institutional trust lands for their highest and best trust land use.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitymaximize the commercial gain from trust land uses for school and institutional trust lands consistent with long-term support of beneficiariesSITLAR850-2-200
Land UseProductivitypermit other land uses or activities not prohibited by law which do not constitute a loss of trust assets or loss of economic opportunity.SITLAR850-2-200
Land UseOpen spaceOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
Land UseStandards/zoningFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
Land UseOpen spaceEncourage conservation of open space and irreplaceable natural resources in land use decisions.Wasatch Choices 204018
Land UseStandards/zoningPromote conservation of regionally significant critical lands.Wasatch Choices 204018
Land UseStandards/zoningProtect and enhance the natural environment.Wasatch Choices 204018
Land UseVisual/aestheticsEnhance the aesthetic beauty of our built environment.Wasatch Choices 204018
Land UseEnsure that development occurs in a manner and location that protects natural
resources, including but not limited to pollution prevention, erosion prevention,
national forests, crucial wildlife habitat and corridors, agricultural lands, fisheries,
water quality, wetlands, scenic view sheds, riparian areas, wildlife and clean air.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Land UseEnsure that land is appropriately reclaimed and restored following the conclusion of
disruptive activities.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Land UseOpen SpaceOpen space should be maintained and preserved according to its
classification: Pristine, Managed-Recreational, Active, Internal Public Space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceConservation easements, deed restrictions, trail easements, and/or
plat notes should be recorded confirming the purpose of the land and identifying
restrictions.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceAppropriate ownership and management entity, either public or
private, should be determined at time of preservation.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceWhen open space lands benefit only a single development with limited to
no public access, those lands should remain under private ownership.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceWhen open space lands are preserved that benefit the greater community
and allow for greater public access and civic needs, those should be
owned and managed by a public entity.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceManagement plans and regular maintenance needs should be
implemented to ensure that the land’s conservation values are maintained.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceOpen spaces should have a management plan that identifies operations
and maintenance needs, including noxious weed control, on the property
to ensure that its purposes are fulfilled.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceManagement of Pristine Open Spaces should minimize the use of
chemical treatments, machinery, and vehicles in an effort to avoid impacts
on the open space, water quality, and air quality, and minimizes noise.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceConcurrency policies should be in place for public entities to assure community recreation facilities and open spaces have adequate funding to address the impacts of future growth. Implementation of this policy should require that fees be collected in order to ensure that both residential and commercial projects contribute their proportional share.Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceMechanisms, programs, and strategies should be in place to preserve
lands as open space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County has established the Basin Open Space Advisory
Committee or “BOSAC” as a formal committee, created for the purpose of
advising and providing input to the County Manager and County Council
regarding the creation, preservation, and identification of open space within the
Basin.
Snyderville Basin General Plan13
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should develop on-going revenue sources earmarked for
open space preservation including partnership with the Snyderville Basin Special
Recreation District in providing opportunities for voter authorization of bond funds
and concurrency programs.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should establish formal mechanisms for holding and
transferring land and development rights from high priority open space areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should consider amending the zoning map and Code to
support growth and development in identified mixed use areas to alleviate
development pressure on land that meets the descriptions of open space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should accept cash-in-lieu of open space where such
funds can be more appropriately used to purchase development rights or open
space at a more appropriate or significant location.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceThe County should establish and maintain cooperative strategies
with local land trusts and, when possible, partner with other public, non-profit and
private entities and/or other qualified land conservation groups to achieve the
preservation of priority open spaces.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceAn adequate amount of open space should be preserved for all new
developments and should be identified during the development review process.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceCritical Lands may be counted towards the minimum required open
space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceWhile development should meet the open space requirements, it
may be appropriate in large lot developments to allow limited open space to be
incorporated into individual lots, provided that the open space is outside of
fenced areas and is contiguous to Pristine or Managed-Recreational open space.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UseOpen SpaceOpen space that is required to be set aside in each development
should, whenever possible, be contiguous to adjacent open space and protect
hillsides and natural resources.
Snyderville Basin General Plan14
Land UsePreservation: Work with developers to ensure that Critical Lands are
properly identified within proposed project areas and preserved and avoided to
the greatest extent possible.
Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Land UseCritical Lands Density: Development on Critical Lands is allowed at
base density. No density incentives for development should be granted for
preserving Critical Lands.
Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Land UseCritical Lands: Critical Lands defined in Chapter 11 of the Code are
those lands which:
a. Have slopes of thirty percent (30%) or greater, or
b. Have geologic hazards and avalanche tracks, or
c. Are within a 100-year flood plain, or
d. Are Jurisdictional Wetlands as defined by the Army Corps of Engineers, or
e. Are on ridgelines.
Snyderville Basin General Plan20
Land UseVisual/aestheticsBecause of the importance of aesthetics to the
economic viability of the Basin, views from the designated roadways (Interstate
80, State Roads 224 and 248, and US-40) are critical and ridgeline
encroachment should be avoided.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Land UseStudy and implement an urban landscaping
management plan to be included in the Development Code to ensure the ongoing
health of the community flora.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Land UseDetermine whether retention or disposal will be in the best public
interest.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)8
Land UseThe telecommunications system adequately supports forest resource management. Commercial uses are provided within the ecosystem’s capability only where essential to meet a demonstrated public.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42417
Land UseScenic quality and desired landscape character are maintained and/or enhanced.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42418
Land UseWithin the economic and social constraints of local communities, critical habitat for federally-listed threatened and endangered species and big game winter range under other ownership within and adjacent to the Forest boundary is acquired.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42421
Land UsePrivate foundations and trusts for agricultural land conservation and open space preservation should be encouraged, including protection of farming in agricultural areas and protection of open space in nonagricultural areas.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Land UseZones should be established and maintained that provide land owners in appropriate agricultural areas the ability to transfer development credits to designated residential areas as a method of preserving viable agricultural lands, including the clustering of development units.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Land UseConsideration should be given to establishing cooperative programs for the transfer of development rights with adjacent municipalities to promote and give incentive to the preservation of agricultural open space near urban areas.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Land UseThe open space associated with the shoreline of Utah Lake should be protected and enhanced in order to make the most of the lake’s recreational and scenic potential.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Land UsePreserve and protect natural resources and open spaceUtah County General PlanCh. 1
Land UseAll development in the unincorporated area should be designed to conserve natural as resources, including clean air, pure water, riparian areas, wet lands and open space.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Land UseTo protect areas of sensitive terrain, foliage, water features and wildlife habitat, the county should enforce ordinances prohibiting off-trail travel.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Land UseVisualPromote preservation of ridge lines from development as viewed from any State Roads or County arterial or collector road by keeping the roof lines of structures below the ridge line. A transferable density credit of an additional unit shall be allowed for each unit removed from a ridge line.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UseDiscourage development of sensitive land such as wetlands, landslides, and stream corridors.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UsePromote clustering of developments in mountain environments in a manner that will preserve scenic values, preserve and protect flora and wildlife of the surrounding area, minimize soil erosion, reduce the cost of infrastructure and public services and reduce the impact of wildland fires.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UsePreserve the rural atmosphere by requiring all development to have dark sky compliant lighting.Wasatch County General Plan66
Land UseInstall structural measures to prevent soil erosion, as needed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseRecognize the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) soil survey as the authority in matters of soil conservation.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseBase soil conservation activities on all available survey drafts until a final survey is published. Any deviation from this material or soil data developed outside of the survey must be coordinated with the Wasatch County Soil Conservation District and Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS).Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UsePrime agricultural lands should continue to produce food and fiber and the rural character and open landscape of Wasatch County should be preserved through a healthy agricultural industry consistent with private property rights.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseThe County shall be compensated for loss of private lands or tax revenues due to land exchanges.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UsePrivate lands shall not be converted to state or federal ownership in order to compensate for government activities outside of Wasatch County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseAny conversion from private property to public lands shall result in no net loss of private property. No net loss shall be measured both in terms of acreage and fair market value. All proposed conversions will be reviewed by the Wasatch County Public Lands Committee to evaluate the impact of the proposal and advise the County Council of their recommendation.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseA private property owner has a right to dispose of or exchange property as he/she sees fit within applicable law.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land Usea. The objectives of special designations can be met by well-planned and managed development and use of natural resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land Useb. Special designations shall not be proposed until the need has been determined and substantiated by verifiable scientific data available to the public. Furthermore, it must be demonstrated that protection cannot be provided by any other means and that the area in question is truly unique or essential compared to other area lands.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UseSpecial designations can be detrimental to the County’s economy, life style, culture, and heritage. Therefore, special designations must be made in accordance with the spirit and direction of the laws and regulations that created them.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Land UsePursue environmental management activities with other private, state
and federal agencies to avoid habitat degradation or loss.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
Land UseVisual ResourcesProtect or enhance the visual resource of the area.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Land UseControl erosion where practicable.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Land UseIdentify areas and management not suitable for development.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42433
Land UseIdentify appropriate and compatible land uses that optimize the benefits
to the public within the reservoirs operating criteria.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42433
Land UseIdentify areas and management suitable for project purposes, wildlife
and natural areas, grazing, recreation, access, roads, trails, utilities and
other land uses and activities.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42433
Land UseClose, rehabilitate or discontinue specific uses or facilities where not
appropriate.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42433
Land UseVisualProtect and enhance visual resources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Land UseComply with relevant laws for the protection of sensitive areas
and the natural environment.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Land UseRestore and maintain healthy, diverse plant communities through
revegetation and minimizing disturbance.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Land UseIdentify areas and resources deemed unsuitable for development
or inconsistent with Reclamation management objectives.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Land UseControl erosion where practicable.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Land UseConsistent with the reservoirs operating criteria, identify
appropriate and compatible land uses that benefit t the public.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Land UseMaintain appropriate land management strategies and guidelines
for planning area purposes including: access, roads, trails,
utilities, and other land uses and activities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Land UseRecognize the unique resources and characteristics of specific
areas. Develop and maintain appropriate guidelines for the
management of these resources and uses.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Land UseClarify and resolve land ownership, property boundary, and
resource management issues and responsibilities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Land UseManage to effectively control pollution sources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42439
Land UseVisualProtect and Manage the Visual ResourcesJordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42465
Land UseWork with water users, Recreation Park Manager, and other entities as
appropriate to implement erosion control strategies.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42467
Land Use1) Act on special-use applications according to the following priorities:
A. Land and use activity requests relating to public safety, health and welfare, e.g., highways, powerlines and public service improvements.
B. Land and use activities contributing to increased economic activity associated with National Forest resources, e.g. oil and gas, and energy minerals.
C. Land and use activities that benefit only private users, e.g., road permits, rights-of-way for powerline telephones, waterlines, etc.
a. An application for permit may be denied if the authorizing officer determines that:
(1) The proposed use would be inconsistent or incompatible with the purpose(s) for which the lands are managed, or with other uses, or
(2) The proposed use would not be in the public interest, or
(3) The applicant is not qualified, or
(4) Use would be inconsistent with applicable Federal and/or State laws, or
(5) The applicant does not or cannot demonstrate technical or financial capability.
(6) Existing corridor analysis (Appendix D.) will be used as a basis for evaluating proposed corridors. (New corridor data will be used to update Appendix D).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-37
Land UseGeology1) Complete appropriate order of geologic inventory and as appropriate geotechnical investigation in areas where proposed activities or uses could;
A. Be endangered by geologically related hazards such as land instability, earthquakes, subsidence, land instability, earthquakes, subsidence, etc.
B. Or, increase risks of subsidence, land instability, ground water pollution, or diversion.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Land UseVisuals1) Forest resource uses or activities should meet the adopted VQO as displayed on the Planned Visual Quality Objective Map (reduced copy in Appendix F).Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-17
Land Use1) Locate, mark, and post landlines according to the following priorities:
A. Lines needed to meet planned activities.
B. Lines needed to protect NFS lands from encroachment, and
C. All other lines.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-39
Land UseVisuals2) Design and implement management activities to blend with the natural landscape.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-17
Land Use2) Encourage burying utility and lines, except when:
A. Visual quality objectives of the area can be met using an overhead line.
B. Burial is not feasible due to soil erosion or geologic hazard or unfavorable geologic conditions.
C. Greater long-term site disturbance would result.
D. It is not technically feasible, or economically reasonable.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-37
Land UseTransfers2) Ensure that properties are equal in value on both offered and selected tracts in proposed land exchanges, or made equal in cash payment not to exceed 25% of Federal value.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-37
Land UseGeology2) Monitor identified geologic hazards for effects on management activities.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Land UseRecreation and Tourism2) Provide opportunities for roaded natural appearing, semiprimitive motorized, and semiprimitive nonmotorized recreation uses.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-18
Land Use3) Approve special-use applications for areas adjacent to developed sites only when the proposed use is compatible with the purpose and use of the developed site.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-37
Land UseTransfers3) Classify lands or interest in lands for acquisition where lands are valuable for NFS purposes according to the following priorities:
A. Where lands or rights-of-way are needed to meet resource management goals and objectives.
B. Lands which provide habitat for threatened and endangered species of animals and plants.
C. Lands having historical or cultural resources, outstanding scenic values, or critical ecosystems, when these resources are threatened by change of use or when management may be enhanced by public ownership.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-38
Land UseVisuals3) Rehabilitate existing projects and areas which do not meet the adopted Visual Quality Objective(s) (VQO) specified for each management unit. Set priorities for rehabilitation, considering the following:
A. Relative importance of the site and amount of deviation from adopted VQO. Foreground areas have highest priority;
B. Length of time it will take natural processes to reduce the visual impacts so that they meet the adopted VQO;
C. Length of time it will take rehabilitation measures to meet the adopted VQO; and D. Benefits to other resource management objectives gained through rehabilitation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-17
Land UseVisuals4) Achieve landscape enhancement through addition, deletion, or alteration of landscape elements. Examples of these include:
A. Addition of vegetation species to introduce unique form, color or texture of existing vegetation.
B. Vegetation manipulation to open up vistas or screen out undesirable views.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-17
Land UseGeology4) Assure that appropriate geotechnical and/or geologic data are included in design and construction of facilities, or other developments so as to minimize the potential of inducing failure.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Land UseTransfers4) Classify land for disposal according to the following priorities:
A. To simplify administration of NFS lands.
B. To state, County, city, or other Federal agency when disposal will serve a greater public interest.
C. In small parcels intermingled with mineral or homesteads patents.
D. When suitable for development by the private sector, if development (residential, agricultural, industrial, recreational, etc.) is in the public interest.
E. When important or unique resource (wetlands, floodplains, essential big-game winter range, threatened or endangered species habitat, historical or cultural resources, critical ecosystems, etc.) effects are mitigated by reserving interests to protect the resource, or by exchange where other critical resources to be acquired are considered to be of equal or greater value.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-38
Land Use4) Designate Forest communication sites pursuant to FSH 2709.11.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-37
Amend_09
Land UseTransfers5) Effect jurisdictional transfers which achieve the following objectives:
a. Reduce duplication of efforts by users and agencies in terms of time, cost, and coordination.
b. Improve or maintain user access to the administering agency.
c. Decrease travel and enhance management.
d. Improve public understanding of applicable laws, regulations, policies, and procedures.
e. Create more effective work units.
f. Reduce administrative cost.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-38
Land UseAcquire scenic or partial easements whenever Federal ownership is not required to meet management objectives.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Land UseVegetationAspen is to be managed, with commercial or noncommercial treatments, with the goal of maintaining 13 percent of the Forest in aspen type or increasing the aspen type toward the 19 percent it represented in 1915.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Land UseWildlifeb) Management activities should be restricted during the active nesting period. The active nesting period will normally occur between March 1 and September 30.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Land UseConsider special-use applications and permits on the basis of relative benefit to the public and individual need.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-5
Land UseRecreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Restrict uses that cause noise levels to that which should provide desirable recreation opportunities.
a. Noise levels within these units will generally be restricted to 30 decibels or less except for noises generated by normal conservation and developed recreation activities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-51
Land UseRecreationDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
Management emphasis is for developed recreation facilities such as campgrounds, picnic grounds, trailheads, visitor information facilities, summer homes areas, ski areas, and water-related support facilities. Proposed sites (sites scheduled for development in the Forest Plan) are managed to maintain the site attractiveness until they are developed.
Facilities such as roads, trails, signs, etc., may dominate or subordinate, but should harmonize and blend with the characteristic landscape. Livestock grazing is generally excluded from developed sites. As appropriate, existing developed sites should be withdrawn from locatable mineral entry, and closed to surface occupancy for leasable and saleable minerals.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-47
Land UseTransfersExchange lands and consolidate ownership when in the public interest.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Land UseWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Acquire private lands or obtain wildlife habitat easements needed for big-game winter range.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-63
Land UseWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) As appropriate, permit special uses if they do not conflict with big-game wintering.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-63
Land UseWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Meet Forest Direction Visual Quality Objectives except where habitat improvement activities occur. Treated sites must be returned to the planned VQO within 10 years.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-62
Land UseWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Acquire private lands or obtain wildlife habitat easements needed for big-game winter range.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-60
Land UseWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Prohibit and/or eliminate special uses that conflict with wintering animals.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-60
Land UseWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
2) Authorize only those uses that would enhance or improve winter range condition.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-60
Land UseWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
Management emphasis is on providing winter forage and cover for big-game species in areas that must be available and unencumbered for wildlife use each year during the critical winter period. Vegetative treatments are applied to increase forage production of grass, forb, and especially browse species and/or to create and maintain thermal and hiding cover. This may include prescribed burning, seeding, spraying, planting, and mechanical treatments. Browse stands regenerated to maintain a variety of age classes and species.
Conflicting uses are not permitted on a continuing basis, but may be permitted outside the critical season if there is no long-term degradation. Livestock grazing that is compatible with wildlife habitat is permitted.
New roads other than short-term (temporary) roads are located outside of the management unit. Short-term roads will be rehabilitated to provide for wildlife use within one season after completed use. Prohibit motorized use to prevent unacceptable stress on big game during critical use periods.
Acquire key big-game winter range or wildlife habitat easements within or adjacent to the National Forest.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-58
Land UseVisualsMaintain, enhance, and/or rehabilitate visual resources to the planned VQO.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Land UseManage special interest areas to protect the unique archeological, ecological, geological, paleontological, historical, and other special characteristics for long-term public benefit.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-6
Land UseWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Permit only those special uses that will not impair water quality or quantity.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-76
Land UsePreserve in as near as natural condition as possible areas or features of unique natural phenomenon.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-6
Land UseWildlifeq. (Guideline) In active nest areas (approximately 30 acres; i.e. Guideline n.), restrict Forest Service management activities and human uses for which Forests issue permits during the active nesting period (does not include livestock permits) unless it is determined that the disturbance is not likely to result in nest abandonment. If the disturbance is likely to result in abandonment, a biological evaluation (BE) must be completed. To implement the action, the BE must conclude that the action is consistent with the intent of the Conservation Strategy and Agreement for Management of the Northern Goshawk in Utah.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Manage soil and water resource activities to be compatible with the values of the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-85
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Mark boundaries where appropriate to ensure integrity of the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) The VQO on all units is generally preservation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Use special use permits or cooperative agreements as appropriate to authorize and document scientific activity.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-85
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
2) Allow instrumentation to measure precipitation and climate variables needed for research study purposes.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-85
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
2) Permit use as appropriate for scientific and educational purposes.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
2) Protect surface resource conditions to prevent alteration of research projects.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-87
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
2) Provide, as appropriate, signing for interpretation and protection of specific Special Interest Areas.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
3) Discourage or prohibit any uses which contribute to impairment of the values for which the unit is established.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Land UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
Management emphasis for these units is to manage unique ecological, geological, paleontological, archeological, or historical sites or features of the Forest for research, protection, and/or interpretation of land and resources.
Units with an interpretive emphasis are made available for their general use and enjoyment by the public. The objective is to protect the features in their current and/or restored condition while making them available for study and viewing. Other resource use may be made of these units as long as they do not conflict with the purpose for which they exist. Activities that might cause impairment or occupancy of the unit for any reason other than interpretive are usually prohibited. This interpretive or viewing emphasis include sites such as The Grove of Aspen Giants, Pinhook Battleground Historical Site, Scad Valley Botanical (Proposed), World Record Pinyon Pine, Hammond Canyon, and the Great Basin Experimental Range.
The protective emphasis units are set aside from other uses for protection of the specific features that exist and to maintain as much as possible their near natural conditions (unmodified by man) so long-term changes can be monitored.
The objective is on protection, research, study, observations, monitoring and educational activities that are non-destructive and non-manipulative. In Research Natural Areas unmodified conditions are maintained as a source to compare with manipulated conditions outside of these units. Protected units that are designed normally restrict grazing by domestic livestock. Further, no timber harvest, recreation facilities, roads, trails (except for research or study purposes), water impoundment structures, special uses, surface occupancy for mining of hard rock or leasable minerals, or administrative structures (except for that needed for research or protection purposes) will be authorized. Facilities needed to protect the unit from other uses, such as fences, will be permitted. Designated areas on the Forest with this emphasis include: Elk Knoll Research Natural Area; proposed Research Natural Areas (RNAs): (1) Nelson Mountain, (2) Cliff Dwellers Pasture, and (3) Mount Peale, pending further study as to their suitability as RNAs; and specific unique sites (unmapped) of ecological, archeological, paleontological, unique rate plant fossils, etc. Proposed Research Natural Areas that are not selected as RNAs will be incorporated into the surrounding management unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-83
Land UseRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Permit special uses which are complementary and compatible with the kind and level of development within the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-73
Land UseRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) No surface occupancy or use is allowed in riparian units, or within 200 feet of riparian units, unless it can be demonstrated that operations can be conducted without causing unacceptable impacts, in which case, the restriction can be waived, accepted, or modified on a site-specific basis.
a. Locate drill sites and mud pits outside the riparian area unless alternate locations have been reviewed and rejected. If location is unavoidable, seal and dike all pits to prevent leakage.
b. Reclaim disturbed site as soon as possible after use is discontinued.
c. Revegetate or establish vegetative cover to levels that will provide soil surface protection and prevent erosion.
d. Provide surface protection from storm-flow and snowmelt runoff events.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_03
Land UseSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Approve special-use applications for areas adjacent to existing SLD units only when the proposed use is compatible with the purpose and use of the existing unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-94
Land UseSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Manage generally for a partial retention VQO.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-93
Land UseSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
Management emphasis is on making lands available for existing and potential specialized uses. Sites that may be considered for application of this prescription include Ranger or Guard Stations and other administrative sites, electronic sites, and similar special land uses.
The specific direction, Standards and Guidelines are specified in the documents that establish each specific area. Generally, other resource development and use activities within these units strive to be compatible with the management goals of the adjacent management units. However, this is often limited by the special activity or use authorized on the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-92
Land UseRecreationSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
Management emphasis is for providing semiprimitive motorized and nonmotorized recreation opportunities. Recreation opportunities such as hiking, horseback riding, hunting, cross-country skiing, vehicular travel, etc., are available. Some units, or areas within units may be permanent restrictions on human use may be applied to provide for the protection of the physical, biological, and social resources.
SPR Management Requirements will apply to; Arch Canyon, Beer Creek, Black Canyon, Candland Mountain, Fish Creek, Hammond Canyon, and the three La Sal Peaks SPR Units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-55
Land UseCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
1) Considerations of proposed future corridor designations should follow the process and definitions established in Appendix D of the Forest Plan.
a. Utility corridors are excluded from Wilderness (WDN) and Research Natural Areas.
b. Avoid the following management units unless studies that the impact of the corridor can be mitigated:
1. Developed Recreation Sites (DRS).
2. Riparian (RPN).
3. Research, Protection, and Interpretation (RPI), and Municipal Water Supply (MWS).
4. Administrative Sites and Special Use (SLD).
5. Semiprimitive Recreation (SPR).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-97
Land UseCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
Emphasis is on providing transportation corridors for major cross-country pipelines, electrical transmission lines, and telephone lines. Management activities within these linear corridors strive to be compatible with the management goals of the adjacent management units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-95
Land UseRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) On-site visual quality objective is partial retention or modification.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Land UseRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Permit special uses which are complementary and compatible with the kind and level of development within the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-54
Land UseRecreationUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
Management emphasis is on providing high quality dispersed recreation opportunities in areas characteristically receiving moderate to heavy levels of use. Visual resources are managed so that activities of man remain visually subordinate or are not evident. Range, timber, wildlife, and mineral resource activities and use may occur subject to maintaining appropriate ROS user experience or setting characteristics visual quality objectives, not permanently exceeding threshold levels for noise and air quality, or seriously impairing recreation use.
These units generally occur along arterial and collector roads, although they may occur along local roads or trails and generally near water bodies.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-52
Land UseWildlifex. (Standard) When non-vegetative management activities (for example: mineral and energy development, land exchanges, recreation facility development, ski resort construction, utility corridors, etc.) are proposed that would result in loss of suitable goshawk habitat, sufficient mitigation measures will be employed to insure an offset of the loss. The biological evaluation (BE) process will be used to documents findings, recommend mitigation measures, and evaluate consistency with the intent of the Conservation Strategy and Agreement for Management of the Northern Goshawk in Utah.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Land UseGeneral Policy 2 – The Commission recognizes and respects both private and public property rights (both land and water rights) and supports the lawful acquisition of private and public lands and/or water rights when needed to implement portions of this Master Plan.Utah Lake Master Plan1
Land UseLaw EnforcementLand Use Policy 1 – The Commission encourages the coordination of general plans and land use regulations among governments within the Utah Lake Master Plan Area. Land Use Policy 2 – The Commission encourages land uses in the Utah Lake Master Plan Area that are designed, located, and operated so as to protect or enhance the ecological function of Utah Lake’s natural resources. Land Use Policy 3 – The Commission promotes compatible land use transitions and appropriate land use development by facilitating communication, cooperation and collaboration among local governments, state, and federal agencies, to effectively implement the Master Plan. Land Use Policy 4 – The Commission encourages local governments and state and federal agencies to cooperate to provide effective and efficient law enforcement in the Utah Lake Master Plan Area. Land Use Policy 5 – The Commission encourages that any recreational and commercial development project be consistent with this Master Plan.Utah Lake Master Plan
Land UseTransportation Policy 1 – The Commission will consider transportation projects based on whether or not they are consistent with the goals and objectives of the Master Plan.
Transportation Policy 2 – The Commission will be a proactive participant to monitor and influence transportation planning efforts that may affect Utah Lake, its shorelines, or access to the lake.
Transportation Policy 3 – The Commission encourages member agencies to develop trail ordinances and will pursue mechanisms and opportunities to facilitate the completion of the trail around Utah Lake.
Transportation Policy 4 – The Commission encourages efforts to improve access to existing and future destination points around Utah Lake.
Utah Lake Master Plan
Land UseNoxious Weeds,
Invasive Species
Water Quality,
Natural Resources Policy 1 – The Commission supports and encourages preservation of high value wildlife areas.
Natural Resources Policy 2 – The Commission advocates creation of habitat buffer areas along the shore of Utah Lake in appropriate locations.
Natural Resources Policy 3 – The Commission values and supports efforts to
recover federally listed threatened and endangered species and to prevent
additional federal listings within the Utah Lake Master Plan Area.
Natural Resources Policy 4 – The Commission will take an active role in
expanding and improving interpretive and directional signage to inform the public
of the values of Utah Lake.
Natural Resources Policy 5 – The Commission encourages efforts to control
invasive or undesirable plant, animal, and insect species.
Natural Resources Policy 6 – The Commission encourages studies to
determine the feasibility to reduce lake level fluctuation to accommodate
Commission objectives such as recreational use and ecological integrity.
Natural Resources Policy 7 – The Commission will consider engineered
solutions to challenges pertaining to Utah Lake as long as they are consistent
with other goals and objectives of the Master Plan.
Natural Resources Policy 8 – The Commission encourages and supports
opportunities to improve Utah Lake water quality.
Natural Resources Policy 9 – The Commission supports and encourages
efforts to better understand the Utah Lake ecosystem through coordinated
research and monitoring programs.
Natural Resources Policy 10 – The Commission promotes the efficient use of
Utah Lake’s water resources and encourages appropriate actions that may
reduce evaporation and other losses.
Natural Resources Policy 11 – The Commission encourages the thorough and
expedited study of the effects of nutrients on beneficial uses of Utah Lake and
supports the pursuit of a site-specific TDS (total dissolved solids) standard for
Utah Lake.
Natural Resources Policy 12 – The Commission encourages that planning
efforts for the expansion or construction of wastewater treatment facilities
consider nutrient removal in the design process.
Utah Lake Master Plan
Law EnforcementIncrease Forest Service field presence in key areas, improve effectiveness of public information on restrictions, and increase participation of individuals and organized groups in monitoring uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Law EnforcementProvide a safe environment for users, adequate law enforcement,
and encourage appropriate uses.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Law EnforcementCoordinate and enforce appropriate laws and policy, waste and
fire management regulations, and facilities in recreational areas.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Law EnforcementWork with law enforcement to understand the responsibilities between
State Parks and Wasatch County.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42467
Law EnforcementWork cooperatively with other local agencies to maximize the use of
existing resources and funding to ensure adequate levels of
enforcement are provided in order to balance public safety, resource
protection, and water supply commitments.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42467
Law EnforcementRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Use special closures when necessary to protect the unit or features from actual or potential damage.
a. Issue closure order under provisions of 36 CFR 261.50 (FSM 4063.3).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Livestock and GrazingCategorize the twelve [grazing] allotments in Utah County in the Custodial (C) category. Allotments in this management category have limited or no potential for improvement or return on investment. Present management is satisfactory or the most logical practice for the resource involved. Permittees will be encouraged to invest in rangeland improvement projects. The allotments will be monitored approximately once every 10 years to
assure that resource deterioration is not occurring.
BLM Pony Express RMP32
Livestock and GrazingGrazing use in allotments can be improved with
development of plans including goals and objectives. The intensity and level of detail for the AMPS will vary depending on the nature of conflicts.
BLM Pony Express RMP32
Livestock and GrazingBLM will authorize livestock forage use as shown in Table 7 [in the plan] on six allotments. Grazing permits on six small, isolated allotments with minimal or no actual livestock use will be cancelled. These allotments are ...BLM Pony Express RMP34
Livestock and GrazingManage livestock grazing levels and operations on suitable lands for sustainable forage use within properly functioning conditions.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Livestock and GrazingGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
Livestock and GrazingMaintain and/or improve livestock forage on NRL and place under custodial
management all tracts of NRL 40 acres or more in size.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)18
Livestock and GrazingNon-native rangelands are restored to native rangeland ecosystems as opportunities arise.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42405
Livestock and GrazingLivestock are managed to achieve or maintain desired vegetative composition for greater sage grouse nesting and brood-rearing habitats in the Vernon and Strawberry Reservoir Management Areas.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
Livestock and GrazingIf consistent with ecosystem health and integrity, and threatened, endangered, and sensitive species management, forage for livestock grazing on lands identified as suited for this use is provided to support social and economic community stability.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42416
Livestock and GrazingLivestock grazing occurs at a season and/or level of use that allows appropriate ground cover, species composition, and age classes for the grazing unit being administered and monitored.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42416
Livestock and GrazingPublic land management agencies shall maintain livestock grazing permits and grazing allocations as established in their resource management plan until further analysis of rangeland improvements and conditions justifies increased or decreased grazing capacities.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingThe County recognizes grazing permits on public lands as an asset, which may be waived and transferred by the agency. Such transactions must be processed by the land management agency within ninety days of proper notification. Any reduction in the capacity of the permit or forage allocation as a result of the transaction shall not be made without a specific scientific justification and analysis.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingWhen grazing permits are withdrawn from a livestock operator due to grazing violations, the permit shall not be reallocated to other uses and shall be made available for continued livestock use before the commencement of the next grazing season.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingAccess to public rangeland is vital to the permit-holders and the management agency for planning, management, and development. Access shall be maintained and improved as management needs require.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingThe permit-holder shall be compensated for the remaining value of improvements made at the expense of the permit-holder on the reduced allotments, unless the permit was canceled for non-compliance with grazing regulations. Said compensation will be provided for in accordance with Section 402 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, which provides a reasonable compensation for the adjusted value, to be determined by the Secretary concerned, of his interest in authorized permanent improvements placed or constructed by the permittee or lessee on lands covered by such permit or lease, but not to exceed the fair market value of the terminated portion of the permittee’s or lessee’s interest therein.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingLivestock allocations shall not be converted to wildlife allocations with the intent to increase wildlife numbers as long as the land supports the grazing Animal Unit Months (AUM’s) assigned to the allotment and documented in the resource management plan. The only justification for decreasing domestic livestock grazing AUM’s is for there to be a valid and documented scientific finding that the range allotment will no longer support the AUM’s in question. The BLM and Forest Service are expected to comply with and honor the domestic grazing preference on grazing allotment. Wasatch County recognizes that 43 CFR part 4110.3 provides for changes in permitted use. Conversion of allocated forage from one grazing animal to another would require a NEPA process that conforms with land use plans.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingManagement decisions shall be based on the individual range allotment condition and not on the overall condition of surrounding lands. Increases in available forage resulting from the conservation practices of livestock permit-holders (temporary non-use) shall not be allocated or credited to other uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingForage allocation reductions resulting from forage studies, drought, or natural disasters shall be implemented on an allotment basis. Reductions shall be applied proportionately to all allocations unless it can be proven that a specific type of grazing animal is causing the land health degradation. Wasatch County recognizes that, in the event of fire, drought or natural disaster, a variety of emergency or interim actions may be necessary to minimize land health degradation, such as temporary reduced forage allocation for livestock and wildlife. Forage allocation reductions shall be temporary. Grazing allocations shall be restored when forage production is restoredWasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingNoxious weed and invasive plant control efforts that affect forage allocations shall be discussed by the land management agency with livestock representatives, neighboring landowners, and the County weed specialist. After the discussion, a weed control plan shall be developed and implemented. Control of noxious weed species shall be conducted in accordance to the Wasatch County Noxious Weed Plan.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingPublic land management agencies shall endeavor to inspect riparian and sensitive areas with livestock permittees. If riparian areas are damaged or degraded before the livestock enter the grazing allotment, the management agency and representatives shall make a record of the condition and appropriate mitigation shall be acceptable to all parties. A copy of the signed report shall be filed with the agency and provided to the permit-holder, Wasatch County and the appropriate state agency responsible for the management of the offending wildlife species.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingIncreases in available forage resulting from practices or improvements implemented by managing agency will be allocated proportionately to all forage allocations, unless the funding source specifies the benefactor.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingChanges in season of use or forage allocation must not be made without full and meaningful consultation with permittee. The permittee must be the first point of contact.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingThe continued viability of livestock operations and the livestock industry shall be supported on federal and state lands within Wasatch County by management of the lands and forage resources and the optimization of animal unit months for livestock in accordance with the multiple-use provisions of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, 43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq., the provisions of the Taylor Grazing Act of 1934, 43 U.S.C. 315 et seq., and the provisions of the Public Rangelands Improvement Act of 1978, 43 U.S.C. 1901 et seq.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Livestock and GrazingThe rangelands of Summit County are a very important part of the livestock management system for the state of Utah. The rangeland in this county serves as critical summer range for sheep and cattle all across northern Utah, as well as habitat for elk, deer, and moose.Summit County Resource Assessment10
Livestock and Grazingresource concerns can be remedied utilizing existing rangeland management techniques, including implementing improved rotational grazing systems, implementing brush management to reduce canopy cover of cedar, integrated pest management, and range planting in areas of heavy infestation of noxious plants.Summit County Resource Assessment10
Livestock and GrazingGRA-6
Continue livestock forage allocations as noted in Appendix R-8, with 99,520 active AUMs allocated for livestock grazing and 39,701 suspended AUMs, except, if permits on the Green River and Rock Creek Allotments in the Desolation Canyon/Green River Corridor were relinquished, there could be a reduction of up to 710 active AUMs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008100
Livestock and GrazingRange Creek Allotment:
GRA-7
Authorize livestock (cattle and/or horses) grazing within this area on a prescription basis. Grazing will be used as a management tool for the benefit of resource values—watershed, riparian, fisheries, and wildlife. Grazing will also be used to reduce the potential risk of wildland fires because of accumulation of vegetation fine fuel loads.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008100
Livestock and GrazingDesolation Canyon/Green River Corridor (Sand Wash to Swaseys Rapid):
GRA-8
Upon voluntary relinquishment of the existing permit and preference for livestock forage allocations in the Green River, and Rock Creek Allotments, the BLM will stop authorizing livestock grazing of the associated forage in these allotments (which comprise Desolation and Gray Canyons below the canyon rim). The forage that had been allocated to livestock will serve the following purposes:
- Vegetation maintenance
- Soil stabilization and erosion reduction
- Additional wildlife habitat protection and reduced competition for available food, space, cover, and water
- Maintenance or enhancement of high-value recreational lands and existing settings and experiences
- Enhancement of values and conditions in the Desolation Canyon NHL.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008100
Livestock and GrazingGRA-6
Continue livestock forage allocations as noted in Appendix R-8, with 99,520 active AUMs allocated for livestock grazing and 39,701 suspended AUMs, except, if permits on the Green River and Rock Creek Allotments in the Desolation Canyon/Green River Corridor were relinquished, there could be a reduction of up to 710 active AUMs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008100
Livestock and GrazingRange Creek Allotment:
GRA-7
Authorize livestock (cattle and/or horses) grazing within this area on a prescription basis. Grazing will be used as a management tool for the benefit of resource values—watershed, riparian, fisheries, and wildlife. Grazing will also be used to reduce the potential risk of wildland fires because of accumulation of vegetation fine fuel loads.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008100
Livestock and GrazingDesolation Canyon/Green River Corridor (Sand Wash to Swaseys Rapid):
GRA-8
Upon voluntary relinquishment of the existing permit and preference for livestock forage allocations in the Green River, and Rock Creek Allotments, the BLM will stop authorizing livestock grazing of the associated forage in these allotments (which comprise Desolation and Gray Canyons below the canyon rim). The forage that had been allocated to livestock will serve the following purposes:
- Vegetation maintenance
- Soil stabilization and erosion reduction
- Additional wildlife habitat protection and reduced competition for available food, space, cover, and water
- Maintenance or enhancement of high-value recreational lands and existing settings and experiences
- Enhancement of values and conditions in the Desolation Canyon NHL.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008100
Livestock and GrazingLabyrinth Canyon/Green River Corridor (Confluence of San Rafael River to Mineral Bottom):
GRA-9
Grazing will continue in this area as currently allocated, including coordination with Glen Canyon National Recreation Area along the Labyrinth Canyon corridor (beyond Mineral Bottom).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingChimney Canyon/Hidden Splendor/Muddy (Hondo, Red Canyon, and McKay Flat Allotments):
GRA-10
Set grazing season of use from October 16 to March 31 in the Red Canyon, McKay Flat, and Hondo Allotments with no change in AUMs (cattle numbers will be adjusted to reflect no change in AUMs) for the following reasons:
- Orderly administration of the range
- Vegetation enhancement
- Soil stabilization and erosion reduction
- Additional wildlife habitat protection and reduced competition for available food, space, cover, and water
- Maintenance or enhancement of high-value recreational lands and existing setting and experiences
- Critical riparian area protection.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingRecreationGRA-11
Grazing will be closed in developed recreation sites to eliminate recreation-livestock conflicts. Fencing of the recreation area will be required to keep livestock out. Construction and maintenance of fencing to exclude livestock from these sites will be the BLM’s responsibility.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingForageGRA-12
Increases or decreases in available forage will be adjusted among livestock, wild horses and burros, and wildlife as determined on a case-by-case basis.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingLabyrinth Canyon/Green River Corridor (Confluence of San Rafael River to Mineral Bottom):
GRA-9
Grazing will continue in this area as currently allocated, including coordination with Glen Canyon National Recreation Area along the Labyrinth Canyon corridor (beyond Mineral Bottom).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingChimney Canyon/Hidden Splendor/Muddy (Hondo, Red Canyon, and McKay Flat Allotments):
GRA-10
Set grazing season of use from October 16 to March 31 in the Red Canyon, McKay Flat, and Hondo Allotments with no change in AUMs (cattle numbers will be adjusted to reflect no change in AUMs) for the following reasons:
- Orderly administration of the range
- Vegetation enhancement
- Soil stabilization and erosion reduction
- Additional wildlife habitat protection and reduced competition for available food, space, cover, and water
- Maintenance or enhancement of high-value recreational lands and existing setting and experiences
- Critical riparian area protection.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingRecreationGRA-11
Grazing will be closed in developed recreation sites to eliminate recreation-livestock conflicts. Fencing of the recreation area will be required to keep livestock out. Construction and maintenance of fencing to exclude livestock from these sites will be the BLM’s responsibility.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingForageGRA-12
Increases or decreases in available forage will be adjusted among livestock, wild horses and burros, and wildlife as determined on a case-by-case basis.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008101
Livestock and GrazingLand AccessGRA-14
Required motorized access for existing and future range projects will be limited to specified routes as identified in the range improvement permitting process.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008102
Livestock and GrazingLand AccessGRA-14
Required motorized access for existing and future range projects will be limited to specified routes as identified in the range improvement permitting process.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008102
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeWL-11
Maintain sustainable forage levels for livestock and wildlife.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeWL-14
Big game winter range will be managed to maximize browse production, using kind of livestock and season of use.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingWildlifePronghorn Habitat:
WL-15
Current livestock grazing prescriptions will continue, and where opportunities exist, will be adjusted to enhance forb production on pronghorn ranges.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeBighorn Sheep Habitats:
WL-16
Changes in kind of livestock from cattle to domestic sheep will be prohibited within 9 miles of currently occupied bighorn sheep (Desert and Rocky Mountain) habitat to provide an adequate buffer zone.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeWL-11
Maintain sustainable forage levels for livestock and wildlife.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingForage1) Provide structural and non-structural range improvements needed to maintain or improve range conditions as specified in allotment management plans.
a. Complete project effectiveness analysis to determine investment priorities (FSH 2209.11).
b. Construct and maintain structural improvements in accordance with Forest Service standards (FSH 2209.23).
c. Where site-specific developments adversely affect long-term production or management, those authorized to conduct activities will be required to replace losses through appropriate mitigations.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-24
Livestock and GrazingForage1) Within the rangeland capability, provide forage to sustain the dependent livestock industry.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-24
Livestock and GrazingForage2) Manage the range resource within its productive capabilities for grazing and browsing animals in harmony with other resources and activities to provide sustained yield and improvement of the forage resource. Encourage and coordinate other resource activities so as to maintain or enhance forage production.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-24
Livestock and GrazingForage3) Manage livestock and wild herbivores forage use by implementing proper use criteria as established in the Allotment Management Plan.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-24
Livestock and GrazingBring livestock obligation in line with rangeland carrying capacity.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Livestock and GrazingWildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Manage forage uses and limit range improvements to be compatible with wilderness character.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-90
Livestock and GrazingRecreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Manage livestock grazing to reduce conflicts in existing and proposed recreation sites.
a. Construct, as needed, fences of appropriate materials around developed sites.
b. Exclude livestock from areas that cannot be maintained in Code-A-Site category light, as a result of livestock grazing.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-49
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Manage livestock grazing to complement big-game habitat.
a. Establish proper use criteria that should maintain or enhance habitat for wildlife. Limit livestock use to this level.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-62
Livestock and GrazingInvest in range improvements where they will provide the greatest benefit.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Manage livestock grazing to favor big-game habitat.
a. Establish proper use criteria for livestock use that should maintain or enhance habitat for wildlife. Limit livestock use to this use level.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-59
Livestock and GrazingMaintain upward or stable trends in vegetation and soil condition.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Livestock and GrazingWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) These units may be closed to livestock grazing.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-75
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeRNG (Production of Forage)
1) Balance wildlife use with grazing capacities and habitat.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-65
Livestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
1) Improve or maintain range condition to fair or better.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-65
Livestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
2) Balance livestock obligations and use with grazing capacities.
a. Firm up capacities by evaluation methods identified in allotment management plans or if not completed by standards specified in FSH 2209.21 and/or increasing forage production to meet obligations through range improvements.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-65
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeRNG (Production of Forage)
Intensive grazing management systems are generally favored. Range condition is improved or maintained through range and/or sylvicultural improvement practices, livestock management through a grazing system, and coordination with other resource activities. Some periodic heavy forage utilization may occur. Opportunities for investments in structural and non-structural improvements to increase forage production is moderate to high.
Nonstructural restoration practices include a full spectrum of treatments such a plowing, seeding, cutting, chaining, burning, spraying with herbicides, crushing, pitting, furrowing, and fertilization.
Investments are made in compatible resource activities. Dispersed recreation opportunities vary between semiprimitive nonmotorized and roaded natural appearing. Management activities are evident, but harmonize with the natural setting.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-64
Livestock and GrazingLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Protect these areas from livestock use unless the objectives for the RPI unit allow grazing use.
a. No livestock grazing is permitted in Research Natural Areas.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
Livestock and GrazingRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Provide for proper stocking and livestock distribution to protect riparian ecosystems.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Livestock and GrazingRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Avoid trailing livestock along the length of riparian areas except where existing stock driveways occur. Rehabilitate existing stock driveways where damage is occurring in riparian areas. Relocate them outside riparian unit if possible and when necessary to achieve riparian area goals.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Livestock and GrazingSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Manage the forage resource on potential units and existing units consistent or compatible with range prescriptions from adjacent management units. On existing units manage forage with emphasis on establishment of vegetative cover and long range rehabilitation to support appropriate range prescriptions.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-93
Livestock and GrazingRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Manage livestock use to be compatible with recreation use. Locate structural and design non-structural improvements to meet visual quality objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-56
Livestock and GrazingForest ManagementTBR (Wood-fiber Production and Harvest) Management Area
1) Protect regeneration from unacceptable livestock damage.
a. Proper livestock management methods will be included in allotment management plans and annual operating plans to protect regeneration. Permittees will be held responsible for damages resulting from negligence.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-68
Livestock and GrazingForest ManagementTBR (Wood-fiber Production and Harvest) Management Area
2) Utilize transitory forage that is available when demand exists, and where investments in regeneration can be protected.
a. Vary utilization standards with grazing system and ecological condition. Specify standards in the Allotment Management Plan.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-68
Livestock and GrazingCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
1) Manage the forage to be compatible with range prescriptions from adjacent management units. Manage forage with emphasis on maintenance or improvement of vegetative cover and long range rehabilitation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-96
Livestock and GrazingCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
2) Provide special management practices to restrict livestock trailing or bedding along corridors.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-96
Livestock and GrazingRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Manage livestock use to be compatible with recreation use. Locate structural and design non-structural improvements to meet visual quality objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Livestock and GrazingWater QualityWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Prohibit livestock use on areas treated for watershed improvement until vegetation has become successfully established and watershed improvement objectives have been met.
a. Determine suitability for use through Interdisciplinary team evaluation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Livestock and GrazingWater QualityWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
2) Restrict livestock use on units identified as having excessive soil erosion.
a. Sites exceeding soil loss tolerance value as determined using the universal soil loss equation as modified by the USFS, and having a downward soil trend as determined by range analysis procedures (R-4 Handbook 2209.20).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Livestock and GrazingWater QualityWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
3) Manage grazing, where authorized, to maintain or improve vegetative cover.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Mineral ResourcesCategorize lands as open to fluid mineral leasing, open with special stipulations, allowing no surface occupancy, or closed.BLM Pony Express RMP23
Mineral ResourcesMake available and encourage development of lead, zinc, silver, gold and
cadmium to meet the national demand and boost the local economy.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)16
Mineral ResourcesIf consistent with ecosystem health and integrity, the demand for mineral and energy resources through environmentally responsible exploration, development, and production on National Forest System lands is satisfied through contributions by the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42417
Mineral ResourcesAccess to public lands for mineral development must be maintained and increased in an environmentally sound basis to enhance the economic interest of county citizens and government.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesMineral exploration and development are consistent with the multiple use philosophy for management of public lands. These activities constitute a temporary use of the land that will not impair its use for other purposes over the long term. All oil and mineral exploration activities shall comply with appropriate laws and regulations and shall be conducted in an environmentally sound process, including heli-drilling where appropriate.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesAll management plans must address and analyze the possibility for the development of minerals where there is a reasonable expectation of their occurrence.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesDevelopment of the solid, fluid, and gaseous mineral resources of the state should be encouraged. The waste of fluid and gaseous minerals within developed areas should be prohibited. Requirements to mitigate or reclaim mineral development projects should be based on credible evidence of significant impacts to natural or cultural resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Mineral ResourcesEnsure mineral development occurs appropriately.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Mineral Resources1) Administer sites with producing facilities and known reserves with consideration of ongoing and potential mineral activities.
a. Priority consideration will be given to existing operations and/or leases.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Mineral Resources1) Authorize common variety exploration and disposals under terms and conditions to prevent or control adverse impacts on surface resources and uses and properly reclaim the site.
a. Any lease, license or permit may be denied or limited by special stipulations where proposed activities: could result in irreparable damage; may result in precluding existing uses; or be contrary to established management direction.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-36
Mineral Resources1) Minimize or as appropriate prevent adverse impacts on surface resources.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-35
Mineral Resources2) Avoid or minimize significant and conflicting public or private investments near sites where mineral activities may occur within the foreseeable future.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Mineral ResourcesLand Use2) Restrict geophysical activity during periods of heavy recreation use associated with hunting seasons, during key big game use periods, or when unacceptable impacts on other resource uses may be caused.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-36
Mineral Resources2) Review cases of suspected abuse of the mining laws such as occupancy of the land for purposes other than prospecting, mining, and related activities. Initiate appropriate action to resolve abuses.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-35
Mineral ResourcesLand Use3) On classified lands not withdrawn from operations under the general mining laws, provide for reasonable protection of the purposes for which the lands were classified and for reclamation of disturbed lands to a condition suitable for the purposes for which the lands were classified. Such lands may include Research Natural Areas, national recreational trails, special interest areas such as scenic, geologic, or national historic sites, or some other type of specific classification. The status of classified lands with respect to withdrawal must be checked before an operating plan can be approved.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-35
Mineral Resources4) On classified (remaining) lands, provide for reclamation of disturbed lands to achieve the planned uses specified in the Forest Plan, when those lands are no longer needed for mineral operations.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-35
Mineral ResourcesWildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Manage mineral activities in accordance with the 1964 Wilderness Act and Utah Wilderness Act of 1984.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-90
Mineral ResourcesEnsure that adequate reclamation of disturbed areas is accomplished.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Mineral ResourcesWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Lease for oil and gas with the Timing Limitation stipulation (TL1) to prohibit construction and drilling from 12/1-4/15. Dates can be adjusted up to 14 days at each end of the season with exception, modification, or waiver. Could be excepted if winter range is not being used.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Modify, delay, or deny mineral leasing, exploration and/or surface occupancy, where applicable, if they cause unacceptable stress on big game or unmitigated damage to their habitat.
a. Prohibit activities during critical periods of big-game use.
b. Approved activities must be short-term and prompt reclamation must be assured.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-62
Mineral ResourcesWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
2) Lease for oil and gas with the Controlled Surface Use stipulation (CSU-TH1) to limit surface disturbance and avoidance to big game from oil and gas activities to 10% of any GWR. Could be excepted if adjacent habitat is enhanced increasing GWR or KWR habitat in or adjacent to the unit disturbed.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Lease for oil and gas with the Timing Limitation stipulation (TL1) to prohibit construction and drilling from 12/1-4/15. Dates can be adjusted up to 14 days at each end of the season with exception, modification, or waiver. Could be excepted if winter range is not being used.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Modify, delay, or deny mineral leasing, exploration and/or surface occupancy, where applicable, if it causes unacceptable stress on big game or unmitigated damage to their habitat.
a. Prohibit activities during critical periods of big-game use.
b. Approved activities must be short-term and prompt reclamation must be assured.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-59
Mineral ResourcesWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
2) Lease for oil and gas with the Controlled Surface Use stipulation (CSU-TH1) to limit surface disturbance and avoidance to big game from oil and gas activities to 1% of any KWR. Could be excepted if adjacent habitat is enhanced increasing KWR habitat in the unit being disturbed.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesManage geologic resources, common variety minerals, ground water, and underground spaces (superficial deposits, bedrocks, structures, and processes) to meet resource needs and minimize adverse effects.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Mineral ResourcesLand UseMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) Coordinate developments that may conflict with the intended purpose of existing or potential units to minimize or eliminate the conflict.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-82
Mineral ResourcesMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) Coordinate the various leasable mineral activities to minimize or eliminate conflicts.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-82
Mineral ResourcesRecreationMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) Manage dispersed recreation opportunities:
(1) On potential MMA units consistent or compatible with prescriptions from adjacent management units;
(2) On existing MMA units to avoid conflicts with mineral activities and provide for public safety.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-81
Mineral ResourcesLivestock and GrazingMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) Manage the forest resource on potential units and existing units consistent or compatible with range prescriptions from adjacent management units. On existing units, manage forage with emphasis on establishment of vegetative cover and long range rehabilitation to support appropriate range prescriptions.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-81
Mineral ResourcesWildlife/FisheriesMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) Manage to the extent possible potential or existing long-term impacts on potential or existing units consistent or compatible with wildlife and fish habitat prescriptions from adjacent management units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-81
Mineral ResourcesForest ManagementMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) On potential units manage forest cover types consistent or compatible with prescription from adjacent management units unless a specific use requires special forest cover management.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-81
Mineral ResourcesLand UseMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
1) VQO is modification, except after dark the VQO may be maximum modification owing to artificial lighting.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-81
Mineral ResourcesLand UseMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
2) Issue special-use permits for off-lease facilities consistent with policy and guidelines.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-82
Mineral ResourcesForest ManagementMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
2) Maintain forest cover types on undisturbed sites with emphasis on long range establishment of stands compatible with adjacent management units. As appropriate, rehabilitate disturbed lands using forest cover types.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-81
Mineral ResourcesLand UseMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
2) Upon completion of the planned surface use, restore disturbed sites to their predisturbed conditions unless otherwise directed in the document authorizing the use.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-82
Mineral ResourcesForest ManagementMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
3) Utilize forest products through both commercial and noncommercial methods.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-81
Mineral ResourcesMMA (Leasable Minerals Development) Management Area
Management emphasis is on making land surface available for existing and potential major mineral developments. This prescription is applies where the lands surface is or will be used for facilities needed for the extraction of leasable minerals over an extended period. The areas associated with known, potential, development sites are included in this unit. Additional areas may be added to this unit as mines or fields are located and developed. As the developments are removed and restoration is completed, these areas may be changed to other appropriate management units.
In units where mineral development is pending, renewable resource activities strive to be compatible with the management goals of adjacent management units. Long-term investments, such as timber planting, generally are not made. However, short-term investments, such as range and wildlife revegetation projects, may be made on these units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-80
Mineral ResourcesWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Allow mineral leasing where it has been determined that stipulated methods of mining will not affect the watershed values to any significant degree.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-76
Mineral ResourcesWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Avoid or minimize and mitigate detrimental disturbance to the MWS unit by mineral activities. Initiate timely and effective rehabilitation of disturbed sites.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-76
Mineral ResourcesWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
2) Lease for oil and gas with the No Surface Occupancy stipulation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesProvide for the interpretation of surface and subsurface geologic conditions and processes such as landsliding.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Mineral ResourcesLivestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
1) Provide appropriate mitigation measures to assure continued livestock access and use.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-66
Mineral ResourcesLivestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
2) Those authorized to conduct developments will be required to replace losses through appropriate mitigations, where a site specific development adversely affects long-term production or management.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-66
Mineral ResourcesLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Allow mineral activities where it has been determined that stipulated methods of extraction will not affect the RPI unit values.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-85
Mineral ResourcesLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Lease for oil and gas with the No Surface Occupancy stipulation. Would be waived if an RPI area is studied, is not converted to a Research Natural Area, and is returned to management as the surrounding management unit.
a. Prohibit seismic or prospecting activities in Research Natural Areas.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Manage mineral activities to be compatible with RPI unit objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-85
Mineral ResourcesLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Withdraw the RPI unit from mineral entry where needed to protect the unit values.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-86
Mineral ResourcesRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Avoid and mitigate detrimental disturbance to the riparian area by mineral activities. Initiate timely and effective rehabilitation of disturbed sites.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-72
Mineral ResourcesRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
3) Design and locate settling ponds to prevent washout during high water. Locate settling ponds outside of the active channel. Restore channel changes to hydraulic geometry standards for each stream type.
a. Permit diversion activities within the riparian unit where technology is available to maintain water quality standards, sediment threshold limits, instream flow standards, vegetation, and fish and wildlife cover.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-72
Mineral ResourcesSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Allow mineral leasing where it has been determined that stipulated methods of mining will not affect the authorized use to any significant degree.
a. The No Surface Occupancy stipulation will be used for oil and gas leasing, with the understanding that the stipulation may be waived, accepted, or modified on a site-specific basis.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_03
Mineral ResourcesSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Close the unit to sale or other use of saleable minerals.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-94
Mineral ResourcesSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Manage mineral activities to be compatible with the authorized use.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-93
Mineral ResourcesSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Withdraw the unit from mineral entry as needed to assure the authorized use can be continued.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-94
Mineral ResourcesSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
2) Lease for oil and gas with the No Surface Occupancy stipulation. Could be excepted if operations would not conflict with administration of facilities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Allow mineral activities that are designed to cause the least impact and facilitate final reclamation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Mineral ResourcesRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Lease high-use areas (Plate 3) for oil and gas with the No Surface Occupancy stipulation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
2) Lease low-use areas (Plate 3) for oil and gas with the Controlled Surface Use facilities. Other facilities would be located in other areas.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
2) Reclaim sites where mineral activities occur within 12 months after cessation of mineral activity in SPR units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Amend_02
Mineral ResourcesRecreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Manage mineral activities to be compatible with recreation uses and visual quality objectives.
a. Lease the Huntington Canyon UDM for oil and gas with the No Surface Occupancy stipulation. The stipulation would not prohibit project roads from being constructed from State Hwy 31 to adjacent areas.
b. Lease other UDM units for oil and gas with standard terms only.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-54
Amend_06
Mineral ResourcesWater QualityWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Restore structural watershed improvements impacted by minerals activities, where appropriate.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-79
MiningApplications to remove other types of leasable minerals such as phosphate, tar sands, and oil shale, will be processed on a case-by-case basis. Stipulations to protect important surface values will be required based on review of each proposal.BLM Pony Express RMP28
MiningCategorize lands as open to fluid mineral leasing, open with special stipulations, allowing no surface occupancy, or closed.BLM Pony Express RMP23
Noxious WeedsImprove Forest user’s awareness of what noxious weeds are and how they spread and increase Forest users’ active participation in reducing and preventing infestations.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Noxious weedsAppropriately manage existing and invasive weeds in Utah through: A) education and research; B) Mapping and monitoring; C) Prevention, early detection, and rapid response; D) Control - integrated weed management; E) Restoration; F) Regulation and enforcement; G) Funding.Utah Strategic Plan for Managing Noxious and Invasive Weeds18
Noxious WeedsInvasive plant dominance/presence is reduced or eliminated in locations or habitats where such an outcome is realistic (ecologically and economically).Utah Wildlife Action Plan228
Noxious WeedsLocations/habitats that currently do not have non-­‐native plant problems remain free from the introduction and spread of invasive non-­‐native plants.Utah Wildlife Action Plan226
Noxious weedsEstablished noxious weed infestations are not increasing or are reduced to low densities. New invader species are not becoming established. New infestations of species are contained or reduced. New populations of existing noxious weeds are eradicated or reduced in highly susceptible, often disturbed areas. Native plants dominate most landscapes that have been rehabilitated.Wasatch-Cache National Forest Noxious Weed Treatment Program: DEIS42384
Noxious weedsRequire long-term management plans for all designated open space areas. Pursue an
aggressive weed control program that addresses noxious weeds.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Noxious weedsActivities and vegetation management minimize or eliminate the occurrence of non-native pests (including noxious weeds) and epidemic episodes of native pests.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42407
Noxious weedsEmphasis will be placed on cooperating with seed suppliers to grow State-certified, local, source-identified seed. To the extent possible, this seed should be of species the Forest uses or desires to use in revegetation. Preference will be given to using field-produced, source-identified seed over wild-collected seed.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42407
Noxious weedsNoxious weeds will be controlled to prevent the loss of soil resource.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Noxious weedsFarmers, ranchers, land management agencies and governments work together in a coordinated effort to control noxious weeds in Wasatch County. These interests shall develop common management goals, facilitate effective treatment, and coordinate efforts through the county “Coordinated Weed Management Area” program.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Noxious weedsThe Wasatch County Noxious Weed Management Plan shall be implemented for preventing, containing, or controlling undesirable plant species or groups of species using all available strategies and techniques prescribed by the State Noxious Weed Act.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Noxious weedsImplement integrated pest management strategies.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42433
Noxious weedsImplement integrated pest management strategies.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Noxious weedsIdentify locations and extent of where state-listed noxious weeds,
invasive exotics, and other plants are a problem requiring action.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42465
Noxious weedsFollow the Integrated Pest Management Plan.Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42465
Noxious weedsWeeds are a problem for everyone. Federal, state, and local agencies and private landowners are responsible for the noxious weeds present on their lands. Prevention, early detection, control, and eradication of noxious weeds are the most practical means of weed management.Summit County Resource Assessment, Wasatch County Resource Assessment5
Noxious weedsEducation is one of the best weed prevention measures. Each year, the county works with over 100 private landowners, providing education and helping them with their weed problems. In addition, each of the CWMAs within Utah County promotes educational field days with land managers and the public to increase awareness and special-ized training.Utah County Resource Assessment5
Noxious Weeds3) Control and reduce noxious weeds and poisonous plants, using integrated pest management techniques and strategies; including the use of herbicides, biological control agents, and/or mechanical or hand treatments.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-25
Noxious WeedsControl noxious weeds and poisonous plants in cooperation with Forest users and State and local agencies.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Noxious WeedsThe Goal of the Wasatch County Weed Board is to further our efforts through the county coordinator and weed area CWMA programs to work with the several agencies within the county for the purpose of control and containment of the spread of noxious weeds. Our goal also is to guide and assist the private land owners to control weeds on their lands.Wasatch County Public Works Department. 2009. Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County7
Predator ControlMaintain a healthy cougar population within their current distribution while considering human safety, economic concerns, other wildlife species, and maintaining hunting traditions through 2025.Utah Cougar Management Plan3
Predator ControlThe DWR predator-control program provides incentives for hunters to remove coyotes. Primary goal of the program is to remove coyotes from areas where they may prey on mule deer. Participants receive $50 for each properly documented coyote that they kill in Utah.Utah Predator Control Program Summary 2014-20150
Predator ControlDepleted native species whose populations require relief from native predators, receive assistance for as long as they need it, and no longer.Utah Wildlife Action Plan240
Predator ControlHighly human-­‐tolerant problematic bird and mammal species are kept in check where their success has the potential to become problematic.Utah Wildlife Action Plan240
Predator ControlCooperate with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services in managing predators. Predator control activities will only be conducted when necessary to prevent significant property loss, significant risk to public safety, or significant impacts on the viability of native wildlife populations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42409
Predator ControlPredator numbers must be managed and controlled to protect livestock and private property values.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Predator ControlPredator and wildlife numbers must be controlled to protect livestock and other private property and to prevent population decline in other wildlife species.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Predator ControlPredator control is vital to the establishment of sage-grouse and other threatened and endangered species. It is observed that the increase in predators, through their protection, has resulted in the decrease of the sensitive species that wildlife agencies are trying to protect. Proper management practices can be used to control predators and protect sensitive species.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment9
Recreation and TourismWildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Manage recreational activities so they do not conflict with wildlife use of habitat.
a. Restrict snowmobile use to designated routes if conflicts with wintering animals occur.
b. Restrict vehicular travel on non-roaded areas if conflicts with habitat needs develop.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-62
Recreation and TourismWater QualityMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
2) Allow light dispersed recreation, such as hiking, but not overnight camping.
a. Require compliance with the Pack In, Pack Out policy.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-75
Recreation and TourismLivestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
1) Semiprimitive nonmotorized, semiprimitive motorized, roaded natural and rural recreation opportunities may be provided.
a. Specific vehicular travel restrictions if any based on vehicular travel use management (FSM 2355).
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-65
Recreation and TourismLivestock and GrazingRNG (Production of Forage)
2) Temporarily close dispersed area camping sites to recreation use where resource damage is occurring or management of livestock is seriously impaired.
a. Where soil erosion and/or compaction inhibits plant growth and ground cover is less than 30%.
b. Where dispersed camping prevents livestock watering and/or range use.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-65
Recreation and TourismRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Permit, as appropriate, construction of developed recreation or interpretive facilities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
Recreation and TourismRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Semiprimitive nonmotorized, semiprimitive motorized, roaded natural, and rural recreation opportunities may be provided.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Recreation and TourismRiparianRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Limit use where the riparian area is being unacceptably damaged.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Recreation and TourismSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Manage dispersed recreation opportunities:
A. On inventoried units, consistent or compatible with prescriptions from adjacent management units;
B. On existing units, to avoid conflicts with the authorized special use activities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-93
Recreation and TourismForest ManagementTBR (Wood-fiber Production and Harvest) Management Area
1) Semiprimitive nonmotorized, semiprimitive motorized, roaded natural and rural recreation opportunities may be provided.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-68
Recreation and TourismForest ManagementTBR (Wood-fiber Production and Harvest) Management Area
2) Prohibit recreation use (including snowmobiles, vehicular travel, cross-county skiing etc.) where needed to protect forest plantations.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-68
Recreation and TourismCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
1) Manage dispersed recreation opportunities to avoid conflicts with the permitted uses of the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-96
Recreation and TourismWater QualityWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Provide for current recreation uses that do not conflict with watershed improvement objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Recreation and TourismPlanningManage the following areas as Special Recreation Management Areas (RMAs): Bonneville Salt Flats, Pony Express Route, North Deep Creek, Payson Motocross Track, Knolls Special RMA.BLM Pony Express RMP40
Recreation and TourismUser groupsDesignate all public land in the Resource Area as either open, closed, or limited for off-road vehicle (OHV) use.BLM Pony Express RMP41
Recreation and TourismPlanningThe recreation system in the Central Wasatch is balanced, sustainable, and provides a range of settings that accommodates increasing demand for year-round outdoor recreation opportunities while protecting solitude, naturalness, and other backcountry values by encouraging stewardship and high levels of use at thoughtfully designed locations with convenient access.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics6
Recreation and TourismPlanningPreserve special, unique recreation areas and settings to maintain opportunities for solitude and naturalness.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics6
Recreation and TourismPlanningBy 2040, the Central Wasatch Mountains achieve a balance of broadly shared economic growth, high-quality development and high-value transportation infrastructure that is attractive, sustainable, and provides opportunity for visitors and residents. The Central Wasatch brand is clearly differentiated as high quality, convenient, and unique in the world, with diverse use and access options. Prioritized protection of natural and scenic resources ensures that quality of life and quality of experience are enhanced over the long term.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics3
Recreation and TourismPlanningImprove the quality of experience for residents and visitors.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics3
Recreation and TourismPlanningIdentify and establish high use areas to focus where future growth in recreation occurs.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics6
Recreation and TourismTourismGrow the year-round, destination-based travel, tourism, and recreation economy.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics3
Recreation and TourismTrailsProvide a well-designed, appropriately maintained, well-signed, and interconnected trail network that meets demand and can adapt to evolving uses.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics6
Recreation and TourismCoordination/partnershipsInvolve Forest users in developing strategies for managing recreation to meet desired future conditions and address recreation pressures and demands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease Forest recreation user stewardship of resources and strengthen awareness of user ethics for reducing resource and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismParks/facilitiesEncourage private enterprise to develop recreational facilities on and off the Forest that provide for a range of recreation opportunities (e.g. camping and picnicking areas, trailheads, and interpretive sites).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismPlanningManage for an array of recreation opportunities and settings to improve the quality of life for a variety of Forest recreation users. Balance growth and expansion of recreation by managing within the capability of sustainable ecosystems found on the Forest for today and the future.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismTourismUse ski area associated private and public developed recreation facilities to provide world-class skiing and mountain resort opportunities while contributing to the economy.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Recreation and TourismTrailsAcquire lands or easements needed to facilitate Bonneville Shoreline and Great Western Trails development.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Recreation and TourismTrailsManage trails to provide desired recreation opportunities for recreation users and to meet Forest Service standards.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage recreation use of undeveloped areas on the forest to provide for desirable opportunities while preventing or reducing resource impacts and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage uses of new recreational technologies to provide for opportunities while preventing or minimizing negative social and/or resource impacts on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Recreation and TourismUser groupsWork closely with city, county, state and tribal governments to provide for integrated, coordinated development and management (including enforcement) of OHV activities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Recreation and TourismEconomic considerationsStrong and Diversified Economy—We recognize outdoor recreation, tourism and outdoor-related businesses as key pillars of Utah’s growing and diversified economy, and promote them along with other important economic sectors.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationEducation—We recognize the value of outdoor activities in the development of children and youth, and through education and hands-on experience, encourage their active participation.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningQuality of Life—Utah’s natural beauty and outdoor opportunities enhance our rich quality of life, promoting health, adventure, community connections, and personal well-being.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningHeritage—Outdoor recreation is a significant part of Utah’s culture and heritage which we want to protect and pass on to future generations. We will sustain and enhance recreational opportunities and heritage sites.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningHealthy Landscapes—The health and quality of our wildlife, land, air, and water are the foundations of a sound recreational infrastructure.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningLong-Term Perspective; Timely Action—Decisions about outdoor recreation will affect our lands and livelihoods for generations. We make those decisions with a long-term view of impacts to communities, health, the environment, and Utah’s economy. As our population continues to grow, the demand for both development and outdoor recreation will increase. Decisions are best made thoughtfully before pressures and conflicts intensify.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningInnovation— Our recreation industries, policy-makers, participants and managers continually innovate to offer quality outdoor experiences, overcome current conflicts, and embrace new outdoor activities.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismPlanningGood Information—We base our decisions on sound data and share good information with the public to promote safe and rewarding recreational experiences.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismUser groupsDiverse Opportunities—Outdoor recreation takes many forms, from backyard to backcountry. We provide opportunities and appropriate places for the full spectrum of recreational activities, interests, and abilities, including those that involve little or no cost to enjoy. We support responsible access to our recreational amenities.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismUser groupsBalanced Solutions— Utah accommodates a spectrum of activities, while recognizing that not all are compatible in the same location. When conflicts arise, we pursue practical, lasting, win-win solutions in an atmosphere of open communication, broad participation, and respect.State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision5
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease opportunities for viewing mule deer while educating the public concerning the needs of deer and the importance of habitat and other limiting factors.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationProvide a diversity of high-quality hunting and viewing opportunities for mule deer throughout the state.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan20
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationResponsible recreation is promoted and encouraged via effective education and enforcement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan178
Recreation and TourismUser groupsRecreational opportunities (OHV) are designed and presented in ways that encourage and promote responsible participation, while also ensuring that wildlife and habitat impacts are kept at acceptably low levels.Utah Wildlife Action Plan177
Recreation and TourismAccessibilityCreate and enhance access to areas of natural beauty and recreation.Wasatch Choices 204018
Recreation and TourismTrailsEncourage community trails coordinated with regional/state trail systems.Wasatch Choices 204018
Recreation and TourismCreate a system of community parks, trails, and recreation facilities to service the entire population and visitors by working in conjunction with the Snyderville Basin Special Recreation District (“Basin Recreation”), a special service district of the County established for the purpose of providing public recreation facilities and services for residents of the Basin, their guests, businesses, and our resort visitors, including community parks, non-motorized community trails, recreational open space and public recreation facilities.Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismCommunity parks, trails and recreation facilities should be of
sufficient size and located throughout the Basin in a manner that ties the
neighborhoods together and promotes the overall sense of community and
recreation family.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismEnsure that recreation opportunities in the Basin grow in parallel with
future growth.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismContinue to seek opportunities for public parks, recreational open
spaces, trails and recreation facilities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismAnticipate the need for future public park and recreation system improvements through a continuing review of existing inventory, analysis, and evaluation of resources.Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismAssess resident needs based on periodic community interest and
opinion surveys conducted by Basin Recreation to help determine priorities for
recreation facilities and track trends.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismFoster regional recreational planning and interagency cooperation of
public entities to collaborate on long term capital facility planning goals and
development of joint use facilities to efficiently serve the taxpayers of the greater
Park City community.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismBasin Recreation has established “Mountain Recreation Standards”
for recreation based on population. The Mountain Recreation standards are
intended to provide a set of tools to establish clear direction for the amount, type
and balance of recreation facilities to meet the needs of a growing population.
Snyderville Basin General Plan15
Recreation and TourismWork toward achieving an effective balance of Managed-
Recreational Open Space preservation while meeting the need for active park
space to include developed sports fields and support buildings.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismThe Snyderville Basin Community-Wide Trails Master Plan, as
amended (the “Trails Master Plan”), provides detailed trail corridor mapping that
identifies critical linkages in the Basin and connections to boundary trails. The
intent of the Trails Master Plan is to ensure a public corridor to connect
neighborhoods and activity centers, such as parks, schools, community facilities,
and commercial areas, and to provide access to open areas, ridgelines, and
public lands.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismThe Basin Recreation’s Capital Facilities Plan, as amended,
includes plans for future recreation facilities, recreation facilities improvements,
and important amenities for recreation in the Basin.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismSecure public trail easements in an effort to carry out the community
vision, implement the Trails Master Plan, and create a complete network of
interconnected multi-use non-motorized trails in cooperation with other public and
private entities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismEnsure that trails connect with Park City Municipal’s trail system and
other local and regional trails to create a comprehensive County trails plan. Trails
should be considered as having both a transportation and non-motorized
recreation function.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismTrail system improvements should be designed with the intent to
protect and enhance environmentally sensitive areas.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismEnsure adequate capacity is provided at trailheads located throughout the Basin to provide points of staging and support facilities to serve multiple user groups.Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismEncourage neighborhood recreation facilities that are intended to serve
neighborhoods or individual developments. These facilities should be designed to
enhance a neighborhood as a part of good project design and to provide a higher
quality of life for the residents. Neighborhood facilities are not intended to attract
persons from the community as a whole, but rather function as public gathering places
within the neighborhood.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismDevelopment should provide for the reasonable recreational needs of
residents within a development project, which may include construction of
neighborhood parks, internal trail systems, or other recreation facilities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismNeighborhood parks, trails and/or recreation facilities are most
appropriately developed and managed by individual developers or
neighborhood/homeowner associations. These spaces should be easily accessible
and help strengthen the identity of the neighborhood.
Snyderville Basin General Plan16
Recreation and TourismThe Code should establish reasonable standards for parks and
recreational amenities specifically designed to serve the neighborhood or project
level demand.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismWhere possible, internal neighborhood trails should connect to the
Basin’s community-wide public trails system as described in the Trails Master Plan
(the “Community-Wide Trail System”).
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismWhere appropriate, ensure that adequate capacity is provided at
trailheads within the development project or neighborhood to provide points of
staging and support facilities to serve multiple user groups. Trailheads within a
development project or neighborhood that provide access to the Community-Wide
Trail System may be accepted for dedication by Basin Recreation.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismRecognize the desirability of multiple types of recreational services to
meet the broad range of health, wellness and leisure interests of Basin residents and
visitors. Several different types of opportunities exist to meet this need.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismPrivate commercial ventures are an important aspect of providing recreation services for residents and visitors of the Basin. They typically operate as independent businesses that provide facilities, amenities and programs. Ski and golf resorts, commercial outfitters and sports, health, wellness and fitness clubs fall into this category.Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismNon-profit recreation entities are organizations established for the
purpose of developing recreation amenities and/or providing programs that
complement the purpose and goals of public and private recreation sectors. Utah
Athletic Foundation and National Ability Center are examples of these entities.
Snyderville Basin General Plan17
Recreation and TourismWinter recreational opportunities, such as Nordic skiing, snow
shoeing, dog sledding, and the like should be encouraged. Care should be taken
to ensure that these activities are located sensitively, avoiding sensitive wildlife
habitat.
Snyderville Basin General Plan18
Recreation and TourismProvide for an increase and diversity of quality and quantity recreational
experiences while: (1) Providing outdoors recreation opportunities for
all individuals; (2) Maintaining proper outdoor recreation standards of
open space; (3) Minimizing environmental degradation wherever possible.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)21
Recreation and TourismAn increasing number of users are accommodated within the capability of the resource by maintaining and improving existing developed recreation sites and emphasizing management of dispersed recreation.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42418
Recreation and TourismExisting developed campgrounds are maintained in their current locations.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42418
Recreation and TourismDispersed recreation opportunities are offered in areas close to urban centers, with an emphasis on a full range of trail opportunities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42418
Recreation and TourismConcentrated dispersed recreation use is accommodated in designated corridors within resource capabilities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismOpportunities for non-motorized winter recreation activities are provided.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismAn expanded, exclusively non-motorized winter use trail system is provided in the Daniels Summit/Dock Flat area.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismThe Aspen Grove trailhead and parking lot on the Pleasant Grove Ranger District are managed to minimize conflicts between motorized and non-motorized winter recreation users.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismAn integrated trail system that provides a variety of recreational opportunities is identified through a trail travel management plan. This system incorporates the Great Western and Bonneville Shoreline Trails.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismA comprehensive, motorized trail system(s), to include use by non-street legal vehicles, is identified and designated on the Forest Travel Map and signed on the ground. Classified roads may be part of the all-terrain vehicle trail system.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismViable motorized winter use opportunities utilizing existing trails and play areas are maintained.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismThe current level of summer special use activity is maintained, consistent with resource capability. Opportunities for winter special use activities are evaluated.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismOpportunities for heli-skiing are provided, consistent with the resource capability, other land uses, and other resource management goals.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismRecreation education and opportunity information is readily available to the public, and provided through a variety of communication methods.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42419
Recreation and TourismInterpretation and education opportunities are provided at strategic locations throughout the Forest including visitor centers, scenic byways and backways, campgrounds, trailheads, day-use areas, and the Diamond Fork Youth Forest. Themes include Leave No Trace, Tread Lightly, forest health, fire ecology, heritage resources, and unique features at specific sites. Through these opportunities, visitors gain an awareness and understanding of natural resources, natural resource management, and personal stewardship.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42424
Recreation and TourismEstablish recreational areas for the general public which encourage a sense of community and are pleasant and relaxingUtah County General PlanCh. 1
Recreation and TourismOnly parks and recreational facilities that are county-wide or regional in scope should be operated by the County.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Recreation and TourismUtah County government should be part of a multi-jurisdictional cooperative effort to develop and maintain a county-wide recreational trail system which should interconnect major recreation areas and popular trail routes whenever possible.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Recreation and TourismCanyon areas should be designated for recreation use, limiting housing and commercial developments, which will permit full recreational use of the canyon locale and not detract from the natural beauty. Recreation areas should be managed in a manner which will protect water quality, riparian areas and critical wildlife habitat.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Recreation and TourismAdditional mountain recreation areas should considered with increased public demand for camping, picnicking, and scenic travel ways.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Recreation and TourismUse of off-road vehicles and recreational shooting should be accommodated in areas determined to be appropriate for such uses.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Recreation and TourismUtah county should maintain a trails map which designates existing and future county trails in Utah County. The trail system should follow features which readily lend themselves to trail development, such as the Utah Lake Shoreline, the Bonneville Shoreline, stream courses, old railroad grades, canal corridors, etc., and should interconnect major recreation areas and popular trail routes whenever possible.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Recreation and TourismDevelop and incorporate a non-motorized trail system into the future and existing infrastructure of Wasatch County to provide safe transportation and recreation facilities that are compatible with the rural and mountainous environments of Wasatch County.Wasatch County General Plan73
Recreation and TourismExisting public recreational facilities should be protected from development encroachments that would have an adverse impact on the recreational experience or its setting.Wasatch County General Plan79
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall evaluate proposed plans and actions for impacts on existing recreational activities.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall evaluate their plans and actions for potential future recreational activities.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall support the County in developing desirable recreation facilities including, but not limited to, hiking trails, camping opportunities, cross country skiing, snowmobiling, off-highway-vehicle (OHV) opportunities, biking and others as determined by the Wasatch Public Lands Committee.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismRecreational activities are compatible with resource development if properly planned and managed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismTrail development is strongly supported by 60 % of surveyed residents of Wasatch County. Existing and future trails on State and Federal managed lands should be developed to access key destinations and public gathering areas outside the agency’s jurisdiction.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismWasatch County encourages the joint development of Trail Corridors that create the maximum benefit to the recreation user.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismOff-highway vehicles should be used responsibly, and the management of off-highway vehicles should be uniform across jurisdictional boundaries. Laws related to the use of off-highway vehicles should be uniformly applied across all jurisdictions.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismPublic land agencies shall provide opportunities for off-highway vehicle trails, roads or areas specifically designated by the land management agency for that purpose.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Recreation and TourismMaintain or improve the quality and diversity of the recreation
experience at Deer Creek Reservoir. Provide a variety of recreational
opportunities, adequate facilities, and management that maintains or
enhances the quality of the recreation experience.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Recreation and TourismProvide opportunities and facilities for hiking, biking, camping, fishing,
bird watching, and other recreational pursuits.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Recreation and TourismProvide opportunities and facilities for hiking, biking, camping, fishing,
bird watching, and other recreational pursuits.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Recreation and TourismEvaluate the environmental impact of recreation activities on Deer
Creek Reservoir and surrounding lands. Manage recreation effects at
levels that compliment the setting.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Recreation and TourismProvide accessible experiences and facilities for persons with disabilities.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Recreation and TourismProvide for health and safety of the public.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Recreation and TourismPursue and support partnerships to enhance recreation services
and facilities compatible with project purposes.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42435
Recreation and TourismProvide the public with opportunities to learn about proper
recreation etiquette and safety.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42435
Recreation and TourismMaintain and enhance the quality and diversity of recreational
opportunities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Recreation and TourismProvide recreation opportunities consistent and compatible with
the purposes of the planning area and other resource needs.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Recreation and TourismBalance providing recreation opportunities with protecting
environmental resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Recreation and TourismProvide adequate facilities and management to accommodate
uses while protecting the natural resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Recreation and TourismProvide accessible facilities and recreational sites for persons with
disabilities.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Recreation and TourismProvide adequate services and recreation facilities to protect
public health and safety.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Recreation and TourismProvide a variety of recreaional opportunities without
compromising the quality of the recreation experience.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Recreation and TourismAllow other entities to provide recreation oriented operation and
maintenance, administration, and/ or vendor services, where
appropriate.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Recreation and TourismEvaluate the impact of recreation activities on Rockport Reservoir
and surrounding lands.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Recreation and TourismManage recreational uses as necessary to protect water quality
and sensitive resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
Recreation and TourismManage land-based motor vehicles and recreational uses as
necessary to protect water quality and sensitive resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42439
Recreation and TourismProvide high-quality, visually appealing, accessible recreation
experience.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42465
Recreation and TourismProvide Appropriate Recreational FacilitiesJordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42465
Recreation and TourismProvide for Safe, Quality Recreational Opportunities that
Minimize Conflicts
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42465
Recreation and TourismProvide up-to-date information regarding reservoir elevations,
usability of boat ramps and other park facilities, fishing rules and
regulations, rules and regulations governing safe use of the facilities,
etc. using resources such as internet, brochures, radio, pamphlets,
maps, etc.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42467
Recreation and Tourism5) Limit camping near lakes and streams or in watersheds as necessary to protect riparian and aquatic ecosystems and to
maintain the quality of the recreation experience.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-18
Recreation and TourismMineral ResourcesDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Allow mineral leasing where it is determined that stipulated methods of development and extraction will not adversely affect recreation values to an significant degree.
a. Lease with the No Surface stipulation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_03_06
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Allow the private sector to provide recreation oriented support services where it is appropriate.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-49
Recreation and TourismMineral ResourcesDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Authorize common variety exploration and disposals under terms and conditions that prevent or control adverse impacts on surface resources and uses and properly reclaim the renewable resources.
a. Any lease, license, or permit may be denied or limited by special stipulations where proposed activities: could result in irreparable damage; may result in precluding existing uses; or be contrary to established management direction.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-50
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Construct, reconstruct, and maintain developed sites in accordance with the established Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) classification for the management unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-48
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Develop appropriate facilities where the present facilities are not meeting the demand and where it meets the highest net public benefit.

a. Construct and reconstruct existing and new developed sites in accordance with the guidelines in FSM 2331.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-48
Recreation and TourismMineral ResourcesDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Manage mineral activities to be compatible with recreation uses and visual quality objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-50
Recreation and TourismForest ManagementDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Manage trees and shrubs to enhance visual quality and recreation opportunities on existing and proposed recreation sites.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-50
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) On-site visual quality objective is partial retention or modification.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-48
Recreation and TourismMineral ResourcesDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Withdraw as appropriate from mineral entry.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-50
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
2) Provide facilities which are accessible to handicapped persons in proportion to the anticipated number of users with handicaps.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-48
Recreation and TourismForest ManagementDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
2) Remove unsafe and/or dead trees in developed sites. Plant new trees to provide desired tree cover when natural regeneration is insufficient.
a. See Technical Report R-2-1 919810 Tree Hazards: Recognition and Reduction in Recreation Sites.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-50
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
2) Strive to manage development scale 3 and 4 sites for full service when at least one of the following are met:
A. A campground is designated as a fee site;
B. More than 20 percent of theoretical capacity is being utilized;
C. A group campground or picnic ground has a reservation system and/or user fee; or
D. The unit is a swimming site, a boating site with a constructed ramp, or a staffed visitor information center.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-49
Recreation and TourismFloodplainsDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
3) Facilities proposed for construction or reconstruction which lie within identified 100 year floodplains will be evaluated as to the specific flood hazards and values involved with the unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-48
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
3) Maintain facilities in safe condition. Replace facilities when rehabilitation costs are 50% or more of replacement costs or existing facilities cease to be compatible with site design or ROS classification.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-49
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
4) Design facilities and access to provide sites protection, efficient maintenance, and user convenience. Design and develop sites to ensure that developed capacity meets the anticipated demand.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-48
Recreation and TourismFloodplainsDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
4) Post the past and probable flood heights in inventoried 100 year floodplains to provide the public visible warnings about possible periodic flooding.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-49
Recreation and TourismWildernessDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
5) Design, construct and operate developed sites which are adjacent to our provide access point into a wilderness to complement wilderness management objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-48
Recreation and TourismDRS (Developed Recreation Sites) Management Area
5) Maintain developed sites in accordance with regionally acceptable work standards.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-49
Recreation and TourismGenerally place priority on restoration of existing facilities presently below standards.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Recreation and TourismWildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Manage recreational activities so they do not conflict with wildlife use of habitat.
a. Close management units to vehicular travel and to snowmobile use during the critical use season.
b. Do not provide parking or trailhead facilities during winter.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-59
Recreation and TourismKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
Management of Developed Recreation Sites
1) None permitted on NFS lands.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-59
Recreation and TourismOffer a broad range of dispersed and developed recreation opportunities by providing appropriate recreation experience and setting levels.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Recreation and TourismProvide appropriate developed recreation capacity where demand exists and private sector cannot meet the demand.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Recreation and TourismProvide the opportunity for developed recreation sites to be operated by public concessionaires.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Recreation and TourismRecognize the significance of recreation in proximity to population centers and national attractions.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-2
Recreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Consider allowing private sector to provide recreation-oriented support services.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-56
Recreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Manage for semiprimitive recreation opportunities.
A. Close all or part of the unit to motorized use when such use is incompatible with the recreation resource activities and/or uses of the unit.
B. Open specific closed areas to travel routes seasonally as appropriate with specific authorization to accomplish resource management activities and/or uses.
C. Open the unit or selected roads and/or trails for motorized recreation when such use is compatible with the planned ROS Class of the unit.
b. Close or restrict motorized travel to specific roads and/or trails in SPR units.
c. Closure or restriction to motorized use does not apply; (a) when authorized by permit or contract, or (b) to any federal, state, or local officer, or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-56
Amend_02_03
Recreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Permit special uses which are complementary and compatible with the objectives of the management unit and which do not change the ROS classification.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-57
Recreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
2) Provide facilities such as foot and horse trails, Level 1 campgrounds, and necessary signing as appropriate for the protection of resources.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-56
Recreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
3) Manage site use and occupancy to maintain sites so as not to exceed Code-A-Site category Heavy Impact.
a. See Code-A-Site research paper, PNW-209 dated 1976.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-56
Recreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Emphasize semiprimitive nonmotorized, semiprimitive motorized, and roaded natural appearing recreation opportunities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Recreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
1) Inventory dispersed sites as potential developed recreation sites, and as appropriate reclassify as Developed Recreation Sites (DRS) management units when substantial demand exists and based on an orderly development program.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Recreation and TourismUDM (Undeveloped Motorized Recreation Sites) Management Area
4) Provide facilities, as appropriate, include Development Level 1 or 2 campgrounds. Trailheads, local roads, parking lots, and signing may also be provided.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-53
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Provide habitat diversity through vegetation treatments, and/or structural developments in conjunction with other resource activities, designed to maintain or approve wildlife or fisheries habitat.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Vegetate disturbed soils in sites where adverse impacts would occur according to the following priorities:
-Aquatic ecosystems;
-Riparian ecosystems; and
-Riparian areas outside of aquatic and riparian ecosystems.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-71
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Provide habitat for viable populations of native vertebrate species of fish and wildlife within existing ranges.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Riparian AreasFisheriesRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
4) Provide for instream flows to support a sustained-yield of natural fisheries resources.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-70
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
5) Minimize significant soil compaction and disturbance in riparian ecosystems. Allow use of heavy construction equipment during period when the soil is less susceptible to compaction or rutting.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-72
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
6) Maintain or enhance the long-term productivity of soils within the riparian ecosystem.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-72
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
Emphasis is on management of riparian areas, and all the component ecosystems. These components include the aquatic (including fish) ecosystem, the riparian (characterized by distinct vegetation), and adjacent ecosystems that remain within approximately 100 feet measured horizontally from edge of all perennial streams and springs, and from the shores of lakes and other still water bodies, i.e., from seeps, bogs, and wet meadows. All of the components are managed together as a land unit comprising an integrated riparian area, and not a separate component.
The goals of management are to (1) maintain waterflows to provide free and unbound water within the soil needed to create the distinct vegetative community, (2) provide healthy self-perpetuating plant communities, (3) meet water quality standards, (4) provide habitats for viable populations of wildlife and fish, (5) provide stable stream channels and still water body shorelines, and (6) restore riparian habitats that have been lost through the downcutting of stream channels and wet meadows. The aquatic ecosystem may contain fisheries, habitat improvements, and channel stabilizing facilities that maintain or improve wildlife or fish habitat requirements.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-69
Riparian AreasBLM will manage riparian areas, wetlands, and other water sources for multiple use purposes such as wildlife, range, watershed and recreation.BLM Pony Express RMP31
Riparian AreasProtect and restore functioning and connected aquatic and terrestrial habitats and ecosystems.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Riparian AreasRiparian habitat in Central Utah Project-impacted reaches of Strawberry Valley streams, Sixth Water Creek, and lower Diamond Fork River is restored to desired conditions through mitigation activities conducted in cooperation and coordination with the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, the Department of the Interior, other federal and state agencies, and the public.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
Riparian AreasHealthy, self-sustaining riparian communities, habitat for viable populations of aquatic life, and conditions for natural stream dynamics exist on the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
Riparian AreasRecreation facilities (including trails and dispersed sites) are designed, constructed, and operated in a manner that does not retard or prevent attainment of aquatic Forest Plan management direction.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
Riparian Areas2) Give preferential consideration to riparian area dependent resources in cases of unresolvable resource conflicts.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Riparian AreasMineral/Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(6) Within 200 ft. of RPN (riparian) management units that are not mapped in the Forest Plan. See RPN management unit direction, Page III-72. It is not intended to prohibit perpendicular or near perpendicular crossings of RPN units by roads. Could be excepted if it is determined that riparian areas can be replaced upon reclamation and disturbance would be consistent with other Forest Plan goals.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Riparian AreasProtect and enhance riparian areas including dependent resources.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Riparian AreasThe goals of management are to (1) maintain waterflows to provide free and unbound water within the soil needed to create the distinct vegetative community, (2) provide healthy self-perpetuating plant communities, (3) meet water quality standards, (4) provide habitats for viable populations of wildlife and fish, (5) provide stable stream channels and still water body shorelines, and (6) restore riparian habitats that have been lost through the downcutting of stream channels and wet meadowManti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986iii-69
Riparian AreasRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Prior to implementation of project activities, delineate and evaluate riparian areas and or wetlands that may be impacted.
b. Where site-specific development adversely affects long-term productivity or management, those authorized to conduct development will be required to replace loss through appropriate mitigations.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-71
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viability[Measures will be made to improve and encourage the propagation of these important species [bald eagle, peregrine falcon]. BLM will also protect candidate species during critical nesting periods. These species include ferruginous hawks and swainson’s hawks.BLM Pony Express RMP36
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatEnhance an average of 25,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat in
Sage-grouse Management Areas annually.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatIncrease the total amount of sage-grouse habitat acreage within Sage-grouse Management Areas by an average of 50,000 acres per year, through management actions targeting Opportunity Areas. Opportunity Areas are areas which offer the best potential for creating new habitat for greater sage-grouse.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect 10,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat on private and School
and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) lands annually through conservation covenants, leases, easements or other legal tools, with emphasis on the best-of-the-best populations.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect, maintain, improve and enhance sage-grouse populations and habitats within the established Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viable [greater sage-grouse] populations within each SGMA.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilitySustain an average male lek count of 4100 males (based on a ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) in the Sage-grouse Management Areas, and increase the population of males to an average of 5000 (based on the same ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) within the Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatMaintain pollinators and minimize impacts to pollinators or their habitats.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationImprove Forest users’ understanding of the values of and potential human impacts to biodiversity and viability of species.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationIncrease understanding of and support research on the distribution, ecology, and threats to plant species at risk, nonvascular plants and rare plant communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain or restore viability of populations of species at risk, Watch List Plants, and rare communitiesRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viability of species-at-risk (including endangered, threatened and sensitive species and unique communities).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityManage Forest Service sensitive species to prevent them from being classified as threatened or endangered and where possible provide for delisting as sensitive (FSM 2670).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticAquatic key habitats (especially at those locations important for SGCNs) contain sufficient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem that supports the conservation target(s).Utah Wildlife Action Plan196
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticComplex habitats and floodplain connections are restored or maintained in selected rivers/streams.Utah Wildlife Action Plan199
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticEstablish water allocation policies protecting sufficient water to maintain a functioning aquatic ecosystem for aquatic key habitats (especially those with occurrences of SGCNs).Utah Wildlife Action Plan198
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticImplement laws and policies for a broader array of agencies or conservation organizations to hold in-­stream water rights for the benefit of aquatic habitats and SGCNs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan198
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticNative fishes are able to move past water-­‐diversion barriers where necessary or desired.Utah Wildlife Action Plan203
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAquaticNatural hydrographs (timing, duration, temperature, etc) are restored or mimicked in priority stream reaches below dams and reservoirs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan205
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatLocations/habitats that currently do not have non-­‐native plant problems remain free from the introduction and spread of invasive non-­‐native plants.Utah Wildlife Action Plan226
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatRecreational opportunities (OHV) are designed and presented in ways that encourage and promote responsible participation, while also ensuring that wildlife and habitat impacts are kept at acceptably low levels.Utah Wildlife Action Plan177
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationResponsible recreation is promoted and encouraged via effective education and enforcement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan178
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesEcosystems on the Forest provide and maintain viable and well-distributed populations of flora and fauna. New listings of threatened, endangered, and sensitive species as a result of Forest Service management activities are avoided. Population objectives developed cooperatively with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are achieved. To contribute to species stabilization and full recovery, habitats across all levels or scales for endangered, threatened, and proposed flora and fauna species listed in accordance with the Endangered Species Act are protected and recovered, and sensitive species appearing on the Forest Service Intermountain Region’s Sensitive Species list are protected. Newly-developed management direction from recovery plans and conservation strategies to which the Forest Service is a signatory is incorporated as applicable to facilitate protection and/or recovery of threatened, endangered, or sensitive species.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42405
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitats for native plants that provide nectar, pollen, and floral diversity throughout the active season for pollinator species are maintained.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesParticipate in the development and implementation of a habitat management strategy for clay phacelia (Phacelia argillacea).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPotential habitat for clay phacelia (Phacelia argillacea) in the Spanish Fork Canyon area is managed to ensure quality habitat will be available in the future if it becomes necessary to introduce this species onto National Forest System lands to provide for its recovery.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesUte ladies’-tresses (Spiranthes diluvialis) colonies are managed so as to contribute to the protection and recovery of the species within the Diamond Fork watershed. If necessary, these colonies will serve as propagation stock for new habitats within this watershed. Bee (pollinator) habitat is identified and protected in association with these plant colonies.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42406
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesMaintain or increase known populations of Barneby woody aster (Aster kingii var. barnebyana), dainty moonwort (Botrychium crenulatum), rockcress draba (Draba globosa), Wasatch jamesia (Jamesia americana var. macrocalyx), and Garrett’s bladderpod (Lesquerella garrettii).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42407
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesMaintain 20 percent of potential conifer habitat within each Lynx Analysis Unit (LAU) as high quality foraging habitat for Canada lynx.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHuman activities (including special uses, minerals exploration and development, and utility transmission corridor placement) are managed to minimize impacts on Canada lynx and their habitat.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitat for red squirrel (a Canada lynx alternate prey species) is provided and maintained within each Lynx Analysis Unit (LAU).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesNorthern goshawk habitat, represented by Vegetative Structural Stages (VSS) 4, 5, and 6, is provided and maintained in forested ecosystems.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesMaintain high or optimum value northern goshawk habitat conditions on at least 80 percent of known occupied territories.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesMaintain occupation and/or use of known active northern goshawk, boreal owl, and three-toed woodpecker nest sites during vegetation treatment project activities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesNo threatened and endangered species shall be proposed for listing in Wasatch County until verifiable scientific data has been made available to the public that there is a need for the designation that protections cannot be provided by other methods, and the area in question is truly unique compared to other area lands.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesBuffer zones for the protection of threatened and endangered species or other special designations are not acceptable.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesThe County does not believe that it is the intention of the Act to restore all original habitats once occupied by a specific species, but only the amount needed to protect the species from extinction.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesThese designations or reintroduction plans often grow beyond the stated boundaries and scope, and result in detrimental effects on the area economy, life style, culture and heritage. The Fish and Wildlife Service shall exclude areas from critical habitat designation if the economic damage is considered by the county as being too great.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesDesignation or reintroduction plans, guidelines, and protocols must not be developed or implemented without full County involvement and public disclosure.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesAny analysis of proposed designations or reintroductions must be inclusive and analyze needed actions associated with the proposal to prevent growth beyond the scope and boundaries.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesRecovery plans must provide for indicators to track the effectiveness of the plan and identify the point at which recovery has been accomplished. Such designations shall provide access for reservoirs, maintenance of irrigation facilities, fire, and weed and pest control.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesDevaluation of private property by the Endangered Species Act is a “taking” under the 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and compensation must be made.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesOn BLM, National Forest, Utah Reclamation, Mitigation and Conservation Commission and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources lands within the Strawberry Greater Sage Grouse Management Areas in Wasatch County, the Greater Sage-grouse shall be managed in accordance with the 2013 State of Utah Conservation Plan for Greater Sage Grouse in Utah and any subsequent amendments thereto. On private, local government and SITLA lands within the sage grouse management areas, compliance with this plan is strictly voluntary. Wasatch County recognizes that federal law mandates coordinated planning with local government of federally managed lands and they support interaction and coordination with all Federal Agencies.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesProtect sensitive resources and the natural environment.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesProtect threatened and endangered plant and animal species and reduce
impacts to sensitive resources.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesProtect threatened and endangered species and minimize impacts
to sensitive resources and areas including wetland and stream
corridors.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesIdentify areas of potential habitat for threatened, endangered, and
special status species.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatEnhance an average of 25,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat in
Sage-grouse Management Areas annually.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatIncrease the total amount of sage-grouse habitat acreage within Sage-grouse Management Areas by an average of 50,000 acres per year, through management actions targeting Opportunity Areas. Opportunity Areas are areas which offer the best potential for creating new habitat for greater sage-grouse.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect 10,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat on private and School
and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) lands annually through conservation covenants, leases, easements or other legal tools, with emphasis on the best-of-the-best populations.
Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProtect, maintain, improve and enhance sage-grouse populations and habitats within the established Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viable [greater sage-grouse] populations within each SGMA.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilitySustain an average male lek count of 4100 males (based on a ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) in the Sage-grouse Management Areas, and increase the population of males to an average of 5000 (based on the same ten-year rolling average on a minimum of 200 monitored leks) within the Sage-grouse Management Areas.Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-grouse in Utah4
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive Species2) Manage habitat for recovery of endangered and threatened species.
a. Where activities or uses may impact T&E species or their habitats, initiate consultation procedures. Include the results of consultation in determining the viability of the activity or use.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-21
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive Species3) Implement activities to meet the Forests share of approved recovery plans.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-21
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive Species4) Manage habitat of sensitive species to keep them from becoming threatened or endangered.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-21
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesProtect, maintain, and/or improve habitat for threatened or endangered and sensitive plants and animals.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive Speciesy. (Guideline) To provide the greatest reduction in risk to loss of habitat needed to support goshawk populations across Utah, treat those acres rated as high or optimum value to goshawks and its prey that are at risk to dropping into the low or moderate value. Variance in this prioritization may occur when management objectives for goshawk habitat, in concert with other resource needs, necessitate. In these cases, changes to the quality of goshawk habitat across a landscape should not impact meeting landscape habitat objectives for goshawk habitat, quantity, and connectivity identified in the landscape assessment.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_14
Water Quality and HydrologyLand UseMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Design activities to minimize negative or emphasize positive effects on geologic features concerning recharge areas, depth and extent of the water resource, and surface use in the management of municipal water systems.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-75
Water Quality and HydrologyWildlifeMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Permanent wildlife openings or other habitat improvements may be installed, provided they can be done without adversely affecting water quality.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-75
Water Quality and HydrologyMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
Management emphasis is on producing water for municipal uses. These units include portions of some select watershed areas and some springs or other water sources dedicated to the production of municipal water. The unit(s) is managed to maintain the hydrologic integrity of the watershed or water source for the protection of water quality and quantity. On these units, maximizing herbaceous ground cover and minimizing surface disturbing activities is the overall direction. Some limited land uses or activities that do not degrade the water quality of disrupt the watershed or source areas may occur.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-74
Water Quality and HydrologyLand UseRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Prohibit water developments or watershed protection activities that would detract from the purpose for which the unit was established.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-85
Water Quality and HydrologyWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Maintain completed watershed improvement projects until project objectives have been obtained.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-79
Water Quality and HydrologyLand AccessWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Permit special uses which are compatible with the objectives of the unit, and allow appropriate motorized access.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-79
Water Quality and HydrologyWildlifeWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Provide big-game forage and habitat needs through manipulation of habitat or wildlife structures providing they do not result in damage to the watershed.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Water Quality and HydrologyWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Rehabilitate excessively eroding sites by applying the appropriate watershed improvement practices.
a. Base priorities on watershed Improvement Need Inventory (WINI) and Forest evaluation process.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Water Quality and HydrologyLand UseWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
1) Short-term VQO is rehabilitation, in the long term, it should meet the adopted VQO.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-78
Water Quality and HydrologyLand UseWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
2) Structural watershed improvements damaged by surface disturbing activities will be rehabilitated.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-79
Water Quality and HydrologyWPE (Watershed Protection/Improvement) Management Area
Management emphasis is for watershed protection and improvement in areas where watershed treatment (i.e., contour trenching and furrowing) have been, or should be, applied, and where other use restrictions are implemented to protect on-site and downstream values from flooding and sedimentation.
On completed watershed projects where grazing is restricted, maintaining sufficient ground cover and minimizing surface disturbing activities will be the general management objective. Investments to protect and maintain past watershed projects will be made. Other uses and activities that do not damage the watershed will be permitted.
On areas in the 10 year watershed program where the surface cover is inadequate to protect the soil and results in excessive soil erosion rates, emphasis is placed on management practices and restoration projects which increase vegetative cover and control surface runoff. Priorities for watershed improvement should be determined through the Forests Watershed Improvement Needs Inventory (WINI) and Evaluation Process.
Also included, but not mapped, are some areas that have received damage by landslide and flood events. Units receiving damage by such events should be entered on the Watershed Improvement Needs Inventory list and evaluated against all other potential projects for priority of treatment.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-77
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsBLM will monitor selected perennial streams for water quality trend to insure that management activities on public lands comply with existing State water quality standards.BLM Pony Express RMP30
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsEvaluations will consider the impacts of any proposed projects to soil, water, and air resources in the affected area.BLM Pony Express RMP30
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyProtect and restore functioning and connected aquatic and terrestrial habitats and ecosystems.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedProtect, maintain and improve watershed health, water supply, and water quality.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or improve water quality to provide stable and productive riparian and aquatic ecosystems.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore overall watershed health (proper functioning of physical, biological and chemical conditions). Provide for long term soil productivity. Watershed health should be addressed across administrative and political boundaries.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore stream channel integrity, channel processes, and sediment regimes (timing, volume, character of sediment input/transport) under which riparian & aquatic ecosystems developed.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain water in streams, lakes, and wetlands of adequate quantity and quality to provide for instream flows and existing downstream uses including support of healthy riparian & aquatic habitats, stability & effective function of stream channels, ability to route flood discharges, and to maintain recreation opportunities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsProtect waters meeting or surpassing State water quality standards by planning and designing land management activities to protect
water quality.
Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedDesign and implement watershed management programs and plans that will restore water quality and watershed function to support beneficial uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedMaintain and/or restore soil productivity to improve watershed functioning through managing ground cover, soil compaction, and vegetation.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedIdentify [watershed] areas not in properly functioning condition. Improve plant species composition, ground cover and age class diversity in these areas.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyImplement laws and policies for a broader array of agencies or conservation organizations to hold in-­stream water rights for the benefit of aquatic habitats and SGCNs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan197
Water Quality and HydrologyConservationPromote conservation of water [and] enhance water quality.Wasatch Choices 204018
Water Quality and HydrologyImplement strategies to ensure that there is adequate quality and quantity of water for
all new development, and require water conservation and quality plans.
Eastern Summit County General Plan6
Water Quality and HydrologyCoordinate with the Summit County Health
Department to ensure watershed areas and well sources are protected through
the implementation of Development Code amendments.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Water Quality and HydrologyDevelop a plan to implement strategies to
construct/upgrade public sewer facilities. Where public systems are not available,
promote the utilization of advanced wastewater systems.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Water Quality and HydrologyCoordinate with the Summit County Engineering
Department to encourage sustainable and efficient storm water management
practices.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
Water Quality and HydrologyImprove water quality in the Drain Tunnel Creek and McHenry Canyon drainages
by reducing the sulfate concentration from approximately 800 to 50
mg/l in McHenry Canyon, and from approximately 185 to 30 mg/l in Drain
Tunnel Creek.
Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)20
Water Quality and HydrologyWatersheds and their associated stream processes, channel stability, riparian resources, and aquatic habitats are maintained or restored to functional condition.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42402
Water Quality and HydrologyManagement activities protect and maintain channel stability within the range of natural variability to the extent feasible and consistent with valid existing rights.
• When channel changes or alterations are necessary, mitigation measures restore the aquatic habitat to as near natural condition as practical.
• Where water flows could move rechanneled bank materials, bank stabilization measures may be necessary.
Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42403
Water Quality and HydrologyAll activities on the Forest comply with state and federal clean water standards and applicable permitting processes. To the extent practical through management of activities on the Forest:
• Water chemistry is maintained in all surface water where the alkalinity will not be reduced more than 10 percent of baseline, and
• Management activities do not cause exceedances of State of Utah water quality standards (this monitoring is required by law) or increases in the listing of 303(d) streams.
Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42403
Water Quality and HydrologyAn aquatic macroinvertebrate rating of at least 80 percent of the potential Biotic Condition Index (BCI) or equivalent index is maintained for aquatic ecosystems on the Forest.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
Water Quality and HydrologyAll disturbance of land due to construction should maintain a protective barrier from natural streams, flood channels, rivers, or bodies of water.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Water Quality and HydrologyAdopt policies for careful use of water and other natural resourcesUtah County General PlanCh. 1
Water Quality and HydrologyProtect mountain watersheds that produce the water that forms the basis of growth and development in the countys arid setting.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Water Quality and HydrologyKnown water infiltration and recharge areas should be protected from paving and other activities which would inhibit infiltration or cause pollution of the groundwater resource.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Water Quality and HydrologyMinimum stream flows should be maintained for fishing, boating, and other recreational uses.Utah County General PlanCh. 1
Water Quality and HydrologyAny proposed action must include an analysis of the effects on water quality, stream flow, the amount of water yields, and the timing of those yields. Any proposed action or non-action that results in a decrease in water quality, quantity, flow, or changes the timing of flows in a way that negatively affects water rights, shall be opposed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyAny proposed agency action must be analyzed for impacts on water resource and management facilities such as dams, reservoirs, delivery systems, culinary water supplies, and monitoring facilities, etc., located on or downstream from land covered by the proposal.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyLivestock grazing and other multiple uses are compatible with watershed management and shall be included in any analysis of projects proposed.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyThe management of the watershed should allow for continued multiple use. It should preserve the quality and quantity of water as well as environmental values and allow the watershed to support existing and future uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyApply scientifically effective practices to maintain and improve the quality and quantity of desirable plant cover to protect watersheds, timber, and rangelands from soil erosion.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Quality and HydrologyEncourage and establish partnerships to help educate the public on the
purposes of the Deer Creek Reservoir, the importance of the watershed
and the publics role in maintaining water quality.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
Water Quality and HydrologyParticipate in management efforts to maintain the water quality of Deer
Creek Reservoir.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
Water Quality and HydrologyProtect or improve Deer Creek Reservoir water integrity for storage,
quality and delivery. The importance of Deer Creek as a headwater of
the municipal water supply for the Wasatch Front metropolitan area is
recognized .
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
Water Quality and HydrologyAllow uses that maintain federal and state water quality standards or
improve the established water quality standards for Deer Creek
Reservoir.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
Water Quality and HydrologyManage effectively to control sources of pollution.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
Water Quality and HydrologyEncourage partnerships designed to promote public awareness of
the purpose of Rockport Reservoir; the importance of watershed
protection; and the publics role in maintaining or improving
water quality and protecting environmental, natural, historical
and cultural resources.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42435
Water Quality and HydrologyPursue and support partnerships to maintain or enhance water
quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42435
Water Quality and HydrologyProtect or improve water for storage, quality, and delivery.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Water Quality and HydrologySupport and participate in management efforts to maintain and
improve water quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Water Quality and HydrologyEducate the public on the purpose of Rockport Reservoir, the
importance of watershed protection, and the publics role in
improving and maintaining water quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Water Quality and HydrologyManage to protect project purposes, and water operation
contracts and provisions.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Water Quality and HydrologyMaintain or improve the condition of watersheds and reservoir
water quality.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Water Quality and HydrologyMaintain or improve culinary water sources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Water Quality and HydrologyManage to effectively control pollution sources.Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42436
Water Quality and HydrologyPromote and support watershed best management practices to ensure
high quality water for all users and to meet designated beneficial uses
in the Provo River Watershed.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42464
Water Quality and HydrologyIdentify water quality impacts coming from the Jordanelle Reservoir
Project Management Area and suggest ways to meet beneficial use
designations.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42464
Water Quality and HydrologyContinue to operate Jordanelle Reservoir to meet primary project
purposes of delivering M&I and agricultural water and secondary
project purposes of recreation, fish and wildlife, flood control and
power, by honoring all existing and future contracts and agreements
with respect to water deliveries and operations.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42464
Water Quality and HydrologyConsider lowest “life cycle costs” (cost of facility that includes an
O&M component) in all planning and design of new or renovated
facilities, rather than choosing the lowest “capital cost”.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42464
Water Quality and HydrologyThe quality and conservation of water that originates and is stored in the county is important to the residents of Summit County as well as to the residents of the greater Wasatch Front.Summit County Resource Assessment6
Water Quality and Hydrology1) Complete appropriate order of soil and water resource inventories to provide data for Forest activities and uses.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Water Quality and Hydrology1) Improve or maintain water quality.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-30
Water Quality and Hydrology1) Maintain or improve soil productivity and watershed qualities within the ecological site capabilities.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershed protection1) Manage municipal watersheds for multiple-use with mitigation measures to protect the water supply for intended purposes. Allow projects when the proposed mitigation measures provide adequate protection.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Water Quality and Hydrology1) Provide for maintenance of soil and water resource improvement projects to meet objectives.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986
Water Quality and Hydrology1) Pursue water yield augmentation when and where research has shown that it is economical and environmentally sound. During the interim, water yield increases will be incidental to other management projects.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-32
Water Quality and Hydrology1) Rehabilitate disturbed areas, where feasible, that are eroding excessively and/or contributing significant sediment to perennial streams.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-32
Water Quality and Hydrology2) Analyze the manipulation of forest types, when significant projects are proposed by other activities, for water yield benefits and impacts.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-33
Water Quality and Hydrology2) Implement best management practices relative to water quality in all resource activities.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-30
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershed protection2) Maintain completed watershed improvement projects until project objectives have been attained.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-32
Water Quality and Hydrology2) Minimize adverse, man-caused impacts to the soil resource including accelerated erosion, compaction, contamination, and displacement.
A. Protect or conserve topsoil when conducting surface disturbing activities.
B. Provide adequate drainage and revegetation on areas capable of supporting vegetation disturbed during construction or other surface disturbing activities to stabilize the area and control soil erosion.
C. Stabilize and/or close and rehabilitate non-system roads where significant resource damage is occurring.
D. Use soils and materials data for road and trail design.
E. Control livestock and big-game grazing so plant cover is not reduced to less than the amount needed for soil and watershed protection.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-32
Water Quality and Hydrology2) Protect snow courses from site modification.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Water Quality and Hydrology3) Identify, prescribe, and implement appropriate action before, during, and after landslide and/or flood events.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-32
Water Quality and HydrologyMineral/Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(8) Include a lease notice on all leases to inform lessees that they may be required to collect flow and quality baseline information for any surface and subsurface waters that could be adversely affected, prior to approval of proposed operations, and may be required to establish a monitoring program capable of identifying and measuring any effects to water flow and quality that may occur as a result of operations.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedImprove deteriorated watershed conditions where feasible.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedMaintain satisfactory watershed conditions.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Water Quality and HydrologyProtect National Forest System lands or resources from unacceptable damage caused by the development of water uses.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Water Quality and HydrologyProtect soil and water productivity so that neither will be significantly or permanently impaired.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Water Quality and HydrologyProvide favorable conditions of water flow (quality, quantity, and timing).Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
Water Quality and HydrologyRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
1) Prevent or remove unacceptable debris accumulations that reduce stream channel stability and capacity.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-71
Water Quality and HydrologyRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Avoid channelization of natural streams. Where channelization is necessary for flood control or other purposes use stream geometry relationships to reestablish meanders, width/depth ratios, etc. consistent with each major stream type.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-71
Water Quality and HydrologyRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
2) Minimize surface disturbing activities that alter vegetative cover, result in stream channel instability or loss of channel crosssectional areas, or reduce water quality.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-71
Water Quality and HydrologyRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
3) Treat disturbed sites resulting from resource development or use activities, to reduce sediment yields to the natural erosion rates in the shortest possible time.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-71
Water Quality and HydrologyRPN (Riparian Area Management - Not Mapped) Management Area
4) Stabilize streambanks which are damaged beyond natural recovery in a reasonable period with appropriate methods or procedures.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-72
Water RightsBLM will acquire and protect water rights for use on public land and maintain them in cooperation with the State Water Engineer.BLM Pony Express RMP30
Water RightsImplement laws and policies for a broader array of agencies or conservation organizations to hold in-­stream water rights for the benefit of aquatic habitats and SGCNs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan197
Water RightsIn collaboration with state and local governments, federal water rights are quantified and asserted for consumptive and instream water uses necessary for carrying out the Forest’s multiple use objectives. Adequate quantity and quality of water is maintained in streams, lakes, and wetlands to provide for instream flows to support stream- and aquatic-based resources. Identified water needs are prioritized based on resource values, risks, and opportunities.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42403
Water RightsWater rights held by the Forest are exercised and managed to meet Forest resource management needs and purposes. Federal water rights that are not needed are made available for purchase, lease, or exchange.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42403
Water RightsWater rights held by the Forest are protected to prevent their encumbrance by water right applications that injure or have the potential to injure National Forest water rights or resources.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42403
Water RightsUtah State Water Laws of Prior Appropriation Doctrine and Beneficial Use are recognized as the legal basis for perfecting all water rights for the use of all water within Wasatch County.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsPrivately held water rights shall be protected from federal and/or state encroachment or coerced acquisition. Wasatch County shall oppose any movement toward nationalization or federal control of Utah water rights and resources.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsState water right filings held by individuals, culinary water districts, or corporations are a private property right that may be sold, exchanged, or held separately from the land by any entity. Individual stockholders within a mutual irrigation company are entitled to a proportionate share of the company’s water for irrigation use, based on their shares of stock in the company.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsAny proposed sale, lease or exchange of water rights involving a public land management agency shall address the interests of Wasatch County, and such a sale must include appropriate mitigation.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water RightsAll reasonable water conservation efforts shall be supported. Water conserved as a result of these efforts shall be allocated to those persons or entities whose efforts created savings, within the limits of their water rights.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
Water Rights1) Secure favorable flows of water to:
A. Ensure that stream flows maintain stable and efficient channels and to provide for administrative and protection use, pursuant to 1897 Organic Act.
B. Provide for fish and wildlife habitat, recreation and livestock use pursuant to the Multiple Use and Sustained Yield Act of 1960.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-33
Water Rights2) Obtain through the State, where appropriate, water rights for consumptive uses and instream flows as needed for the purposes of National Forest management.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-33
Water Rights3) Maintain instream flows to protect Forest resources and uses.
A. Protest as applicable, water rights applications or uses of others when such uses will interfere with USDA Forest Service water rights, claims, and resources.
B. Special-use permits, easements, rights-of-way, and similar authorization for use of National Forest System lands shall contain stipulations to maintain bypass flows necessary to fulfill National Forest uses and purposes.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-33
Water RightsLand Use4) Prohibit new or expansion of existing spring or other water source development and related facilities when;
A. Loss of water results in unacceptable impacts on riparian, vegetation, fisheries, or other Forest resources and uses.
B. Development and/or facilities would result in unacceptable erosion, road damage, land instability, or disruption or damage of other facilities or resources.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-33
Water RightsMWS (Municipal Water Supply) Management Area
1) Prolong stream flow where feasible to increase water yields.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-75
Water RightsProvide sufficient water for multiple-use management by securing favorable flows of water, which is interpreted to include those flows necessary to maintain stable and efficient steam channels as required by the Organic Act of 1897, and provide for fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and livestock use as required by the Multiple Use Act of 1960.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-4
WetlandsBLM will manage riparian areas, wetlands, and
other water sources for multiple use purposes such as wildlife, range, watershed and recreation.
BLM Pony Express RMP31
WetlandsManagement actions within floodplains and wetlands will include measures to preserve, protect, and if necessary, restore their natural functions.BLM Pony Express RMP31
WetlandsThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
WetlandsProtect and restore functioning and connected aquatic and terrestrial habitats and ecosystems.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WetlandsImplement laws and policies for a broader array of agencies or conservation organizations to hold in-­stream water rights for the benefit of aquatic habitats and SGCNs.Utah Wildlife Action Plan197
WetlandsJurisdictional Wetlands are declared to be critical since development in wetland areas has a significant adverse effect on
water quality, the rate and volume of storm water discharge, and wildlife.
Snyderville Basin General Plan21
WetlandsInvestigate Deer Creek Reservoir wetland to determine if they can be
used to reduce non-point source pollution.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42431
WetlandsProtect or enhance existing wetlands.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
WetlandsAllow wetland investigations to determine if they can be used to reduce
non-point source pollution.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
WetlandsAllow further studies to determine if wetlands can be used to
red reduce non-point source pollution.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
WetlandsIdentify sensitive riparian and wetland habitats and protect those
habitats in accordance with the Federal Clean Water Act and
Executive Order 11990.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
Wetlands1) Prior to implementation of project activities, delineate and evaluate riparian areas and or wetlands that may be impacted.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-31
Wild and Scenic RiversEligible Wild and Scenic River corridors are managed to preserve their free-flowing character and outstandingly remarkable values until suitability can be determined.
a. Protection of suitable segments remains in effect until Congress acts to add the proposed segments to the Wild and Scenic Rivers System and a River Management Plan can be adopted.
b. If Congress determines that a suitable segment will not be designated, management reverts to the management prescription in effect for adjoining areas.
Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42424
Wild and Scenic RiversThe Uinta National Forest final inventory of rivers considered for inclusion into the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System identifies Little Provo Deer Creek as potentially eligible. The segment of river identified has no outstanding or remarkable value other than Cascade Springs itself. Wasatch County opposes inclusion of this segment for consideration in the Wild and Scenic Rivers System.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildernessNo wood products of any kind may be harvested
from public land within the areas recommended for designation as wilderness. This decision will not prohibit thinning of trees for management purposes, i.e., habitat: improvement, watershed, or riparian zone protection, as approved by the State Director on a case-by-case basis.
BLM Pony Express RMP55
WildernessLand Use1) Ensure that permitted private and public sector sites on National Forest System lands which are adjacent to, or provide an access point into the Dark Canyon Wilderness, complement wilderness management objectives.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-19
Wilderness1) Mange Dark Canyon Wilderness Area under the management unit prescription for wilderness (DCW).Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-19
WildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Control man-caused noise levels below that which will provide suitable wilderness opportunities.
a. Man-caused noise levels at use sites generally will be restricted to 30 decibels or less except for noises generated by normal conservation and primitive recreation activities.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-91
WildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Control natural insect and disease outbreaks in wilderness only when justified by predicted loss of resource values outside of wilderness.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-91
WildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Do not provide interpretive facilities at cultural, historic, or paleontologic sites. Where appropriate, restore or enhance these resources for recreation, scenic, scientific, educational, and conservation purposes.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-89
WildernessRecreationDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Emphasize primitive recreation opportunities for isolation, solitude, and self-reliance.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-89
WildernessWildlifeDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Forest-wide habitat prescription for Management Indicator and vertebrate wildlife species may not necessarily be met.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-90
WildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Maintain and/or construct only administrative facilities or structures needed for management of wilderness.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-91
WildernessRecreationDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Manage outfitter-guide operations in harmony with activities of non-guided visitors and include them in calculations of level-of-use capacities. Permit camping only in sites specified in outfitter-guide permits.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-89
WildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Permit only those uses authorized by wilderness legislation, which cannot be reasonably met on non-wilderness lands.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-90
WildernessRecreationDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Utilize a permit system as necessary to manage use levels and patterns to prevent damage or degradation of wilderness character.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-89
WildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
1) Where it will not impair the wilderness character, restore soil disturbances caused by human use (past mining, trail construction and use, camping, etc.) to soil loss tolerance levels commensurate with the natural ecological processes for treatment area.
a. Maintain sites in Code-A-Site categories light to moderate.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-90
WildernessWater QualityDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
2) Control use near seeps and springs or other water sources to maintain water quality and quantity.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-89
WildernessRecreationDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
2) Manage use to provide a low incidence of contact with other groups or individuals and to prevent unacceptable changes to the biophysical resources.
a. Use and capacity levels are:
Trail encounters are usually less than six other parties per day.
Campsite encounters are usually less than three other parties per day.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-89
WildernessRecreationDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
3) Provide low visual impact signs at trail terminals and trail junctions only. Include only mileage, trail identification, and identification of terminal points.
b. Use untreated routed wood signs on butt treated posts.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-91
WildernessRecreationDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
3) Restrict use on and/or rehabilitate dispersed sites where unacceptable environmental damage is occurring.
a. Close sites that cannot be maintained in Code-A-Site categories light to moderate.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-89
WildernessDark Canyon WildernessDCW (Dark Canyon Wilderness Management) Management Area
Emphasis is for the protection of the wilderness character and perpetuation of essentially pristine biophysical conditions inside the boundaries of Dark Canyon Wilderness. Human travel is principally on trails within the Peavine Corridor which is an intrusion into the unit. Within and adjacent to the corridor, the recreation experience would be semiprimitive motorized. The balance of the unit should provide the opportunity for primitive recreation experience. Designated campsites may display evidence of recurring use. However, use would be within acceptable environmental limits.
Appropriate levels of domestic livestock grazing are authorized on suitable grazing lands, and appropriate facilities for the management of livestock may be authorized. Scientific practices utilizing non-mechanized equipment may be authorized for up to one season. Significant archaeologic and historic sites would be enhanced, restricted, or protected from human activities and where feasible from natural deterioration.
The fact that nonwilderness activities or uses can be seen or heard from areas within this wilderness shall not, of itself, preclude such activities or uses up to the boundary of the wilderness area.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-88
WildernessIncrease visitor awareness and appreciation of wilderness values.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildernessManage to protect the wilderness character.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildernessRehabilitate areas showing evidence of unacceptable physical and biological impacts of past use.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildernessManage Wildernesses recognizing differences in population proximity and consequent role in providing wilderness experiences for more people.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-25
WildernessWilderness area management protects biological and physical resources and wilderness values while accommodating recreation use.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42423
WildernessManage areas recommended for wilderness designation for non-impairment.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42423
WildernessWasatch County objects to any effort to manage National Forest System Lands as de facto wilderness management regimen through additional roadless or unroaded area reviews. Utah Wilderness Act of 1984 (P.L. No. 98-24) mandates repeatedly that all Utah Forest Service Land not designated as wilderness, shall be managed on the basis of Multiple Use Sustained Yield principles until such time, that Congress may designate additional wilderness. The Utah Wilderness Act places a moratorium forbidding the 2004 efforts for additional roadless area reviews.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeCoordination/partnershipsBLM will use cooperative management plans to provide an opportunity for wildlife habitat development and improvement. Habitat could be expanded on public lands by converting isolated tracts of rangeland within pheasant range to cropland or irrigated pasture. Cooperative agreements between BLM, UDWR and a lessee who farms the land work effectively. Under such an agreement, the lessee would employ farming practices which provide pheasant habitat and allow public hunting in exchange for farm production values received on the harvested portion. Only areas with suitable soil and adequate water near existing agricultural areas should be considered.BLM Pony Express RMP40
WildlifeHabitatBLM will develop and implement Habitat Management Plans (HMPs) or other more specific wildlife activity plans to protect, improve and maintain all important wildlife habitat. The HMPs will be prepared cooperatively with UDWR to assure that the State’s wildlife management objectives are met.BLM Pony Express RMP34
WildlifeHabitatBLM will improve crucial habitats of present
wildlife populations where condition and trend indicates a decline of desirable plant communities. An appropriate wildlife habitat study will be conducted to determine .the condition of these areas. This information will help guide BLM in planning improvement projects.
BLM Pony Express RMP37
WildlifeHabitatBLM will improve, maintain and expand those
areas suitable for waterfowl and shorebird habitat. Measures could include (1) implementation of appropriate marsh and wetland maintenance and protection through grazing systems, use restrictions, and fencing if appropriate; (2) expansion through appropriate land and water right acquisitions, habitat management plan development and implementation; (3) waterfowl improvement through construction of new reservoirs and modification of suitable range or watershed reservoir projects, vegetation plantings, protected nesting area construction; and (4) open water and loafing area construction through such measures as pothole blasting and dike construction.
BLM Pony Express RMP38
WildlifeHabitatBLM will protect important wildlife habitat values
from disturbing activities by restricting seismic work, well development, new road construction, rights-of-way, organized recreational activities, military exercises, and other disturbing activities excluding maintenance activities in the following areas [and] during the stated time periods [specified in the Plan].
BLM Pony Express RMP37
WildlifeHabitatRangeland watering facilities will allow for wildlife
use. When possible, overflow ponds at water developments will be at least 100 yards from livestock watering sources to allow for a cleaner water source for wildlife. Location of future water developments should minimize conflicts between livestock and wildlife. All livestock fencing projects will allow for movement of wildlife. Design and specifications will be dictated by terrain, kind of livestock and species to be managed.
BLM Pony Express RMP40
WildlifeSpecies/reintroductionsBLM proposes to cooperate fully with peregrine falcon reintroductions into the Timpie Springs and Blue Lake Areas. Surface disturbing activities on public lands adjacent to these reintroduction sites will not be permitted to disturb birds or destroy important habitat. BLM will develop specifics for further management actions in the HMP for the habitat area.BLM Pony Express RMP37
WildlifeSpecies/reintroductionsBLM will agree to future reintroductions of big
game species on the public lands within the Resource Area if the [appropriate] criteria are met [as specified in the Plan]
BLM Pony Express RMP38
WildlifeSpecies/reintroductionsBLM will continue to encourage UDWR’s proposed reintroduction/transplants of upland game birds (chukar partridge, sage grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasants, etc.) onto suitable habitat within the Resource Area. Specifics for implementing any such proposed reintroduction/transplants shall be developed in the HMP for the habitat area.BLM Pony Express RMP40
WildlifeSpecies/reintroductionsBLM will continue to manage the herd size of the Cedar Mountain Wild Horse Unit at 85 animals (1,020 AUMs) and the Onaqui Mountain Unit at 45 animals (540 AUMs).BLM Pony Express RMP34
WildlifeSpecies/reintroductionsBLM will continue to monitor the reintroduced
herd of antelope (150 animals) in southern Rush Valley, Tooele County, to determine if the herd conflicts with any other uses. If monitoring shows that major conflicts exist, close coordination with all affected parties will be undertaken to resolve the problems.
BLM Pony Express RMP40
WildlifeSpecies/reintroductionsBLM will continue to work cooperatively with UDWR to reintroduce bighorn sheep into the Deep Creek and Stansbury Mountains.BLM Pony Express RMP39
WildlifeProtect resources essential to fish and wildlife habitats and populations.Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
WildlifeProtect fish and wildlife habitat to the extent practicable within the
operational constraints of the reservoir.
Deer Creek Reservoir Resource Management Plan42432
WildlifeCoordinate/consult with the Mitigation Commission, USFWS, and
UDWR regarding the current and future role of the West Hills WMA,
in achieving wildlife mitigation for the Bonneville Unit of CUP.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
WildlifeReview mitigation commitments made in the 1987 Wildlife
Management Plans and implement additional mitigation as necessary
as additional development occurs consistent with this RMP.
Jordanelle Reservoir Resource Management Plan42466
Wildlife1) Coordinate the animal damage control program with the State Wildlife Agencies, APHIS, other appropriate agencies, and cooperators to prevent or reduce other resource damage. Direct control toward preventing damage or removing the offending animal(s).Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-23
Wildlife1) Maintain or improve habitat capability through direct treatment of vegetation, soil, and/or water.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-23
WildlifeManagement Indicator Species1) Provide habitat needs, as appropriate, for Management Indicator Species.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-19
WildlifeTransplants2) Consider wildlife transplants to suitable habitat when it is compatible with the management prescription for the unit(s) concerned.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-24
Wildlife3) Give wildlife funding priority to habitat improvement projects which are jointly or cooperatively funded with the states.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-23
WildlifeForest Management5) Maintain and/or improve habitat and habitat diversity for minimum viable populations of existing vertebrate wildlife species.
a. Manage at least 5% of forested areas in mature timber stands.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-22
Wildlife6) Provide for conservation pools and, as appropriate, recreation facilities to meet resource protection needs in projects for new reservoir construction or reconstruction of existing reservoirs.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-23
WildlifeForest Management6) Provide for habitat needs of cavity nesting birds, raptors, and small animals by:
A. Through coordination with project work or resource uses, insure the appropriate density of snags are available and protected in vegetative types.
B. Selecting and utilizing live trees to create snags.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-22
WildlifeWater8) Manage waters capable of supporting self-sustaining fish populations to provide for those populations.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-22
WildlifeManagement Indicator SpeciesA. Deer and Elk:
(1) Maintain adequate hiding cover around calving areas.
(2) Optimum habitat mix for the daily normal range is 25 percent hiding cover, 15 percent thermal cover, 10 percent hiding or thermal cover and 50 percent foraging area.
(3) In areas of historic water shortage during the dry season of the year develop water as appropriate.
(4) Manage key deer and elk habitat so as to minimize disturbance during the period of use.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-19
WildlifeManagement Indicator SpeciesB. Golden Eagle:
(1) Avoid activities that could cause abandonment of actives nests.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-20
WildlifeMineral/Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(3) From May 1-July 5 to protect elk during the calving season and protected raptors/migratory birds during the nesting season. The dates shown above can be adjusted up to 7 days at each end of the season without a lease exception, waiver, or modification. Could be excepted if it is determined that the project area is not a traditional elk calving area or would not affect protected
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
WildlifeMineral/Energy Resourcesc. Oil and gas, geothermal, and CO2 lease occupancy be denied or limited by special stipulation where:
(4) Sage grouse leks/nesting/brooding areas.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986Amend_06
WildlifeCooperate with the State in keeping wildlife populations within the habitat capacity.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildlifeManagement Indicator SpeciesE. Abert Squirrel
(1) *Habitat in ponderosa pine; Sylvicultural prescriptions for ponderosa pine on the Monticello Ranger District should consider management that:
a) Protects habitat by maintaining occupied sites to produce good to very good habitat condition. This should include: 2 nest or feed trees 9-19 DBH; 1 feed tree 16 DBH; and 10 feed trees 9+ DBH within 50 foot radius; and 30 additional trees 9+ DBH outside the 50 foot radius but within a 100 foot radius.
(b) Maintain and/or improve good (1 squirrel/10 acres) to very good (2-4/10 acres) habitat conditions on at least 60% of the total ponderosa pine habitat type. For every 5 to 10 acre tract, there could be: 2 nest or feed trees 9-19 DBH; 1 large feed tree 16+ DBH; and 10 feed trees 9+ DBH within 50 foot radius; and 30 additional feed trees 9+ DBH outside 50 foot but within 100 foot radius.
(c) Stands heavily diseased or insect infested would be considered on a site-by-site basis to determine improvement needs.
(2) Use slash and sylvicultural practices that deter shrub growth, provide ponderosa pine reproduction, but do not encourage habitat for rodents that compete for Abert squirrel habitat components.
(3) Leave Gambel oak 6+ DBH in association with ponderosa pine.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-20
WildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
1) Provide big-game habitat needed to help achieve the big- game population objectives identified in interagency herd unit plans.
a. Maintain at least 30% of shrub plants in mature age, and at least 10% in young age classes.
b. Maintain at least two shrub species on sites capable of growing two or more shrub species.
c. Maintain habitat capability at a level at least 50% of potential for big game.
d. Activities or uses which induce human activity within the area may be modified, rescheduled, or denied if the combination of accumulated impacts on vegetation, behavior, and /or mitigation reduce effective habitat use below 80% of base year 1980 capacity of this unit.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-62
WildlifeGWR (General Big-game Winter Range)
Management emphasis is on providing general big-game winter range. These are areas wildlife traditionally use. Treatments of various types are applied to increase forage production and plant species composition. This may include chaining, cutting, prescribed burning, seeding, spraying, planting, and other treatments. Selected browse species are regenerated to maintain a variety of age classes.
Investments in compatible resource activities may occur. Livestock grazing is generally compatible and is managed in favor of big-game habitat. Structural range improvements will be designed, where possible, to benefit wildlife. Range structures will be designed to minimize adverse wildlife impacts.
Permanent roads and special uses may be permitted. Short-term or temporary roads are obliterated and rehabilitated within one year after intended use. Motorized use is managed as appropriate to prevent unacceptable stress on big-game animals during the primary use season.
Specific cover opening ratios, opening width, and stand design are maintained in pinyon-juniper chaining areas.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-61
WildlifeKWR (Key Big-game Winter Range) Management Area
1) Provide big-game forage, cover, and habitat to help achieve the wildlife population objectives identified in interagency herd unit plans.
a. Maintain at least 30% of shrub plants in mature age, and at least 10% in young age classes.
b. Maintain at least two shrub species on shrub lands capable of growing two or more shrub species.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-59
WildlifeMaintain or improve fisheries habitat.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildlifeMaintain or improve habitat carrying capacity for elk or deer.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildlifeMaintain or improve wildlife habitat diversity.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildlifeProvide habitat for viable populations of the existing vertebrate and invertebrate species found on the Forest.Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-3
WildlifeRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Prohibit any direct wildlife habitat manipulation that will detract from those values for which the unit is established.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
WildlifeSLD (Special Land Designation) Management Area
1) Manage, to the extent possible, potential existing long-term impacts on potential or existing units consistent or compatible with wildlife and fish habitat prescriptions from adjacent management units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-93
WildlifeCorridorsUC (Utility Corridors) Management Area
1) Manage to the extent possible consistent or compatible with wildlife and fish habitat prescriptions from adjacent management units.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-96
WildlifeRecreation and TourismSPR (Semiprimitive Recreation Use) Management Area
1) Manage wildlife and fish habitat to be compatible with the recreation use. Locate structural and design non-structural improvements to meet visual quality objectives.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-56
WildlifeHabitatThe Central Wasatch is a natural ecosystem that is conserved, protected, and restored such that it is healthy, functional and resilient for current and future generations.Mountain Accord: Vision, Goals, and Metrics4
WildlifeMaintain and improve big game wintering habitat in the Walsburg Game Range.Park City Land Use Decisions (BLM)19
WildlifeGoals:
- Maintain, protect, and enhance fish and wildlife habitats to support natural diversity and to provide healthy, self-sustaining populations of fish and wildlife species; in order to supply recreational, educational, and scientific benefits and opportunities to the public.
- Coordinate with federal, tribal, and State agencies to develop information, strategies, and plans to manage fish and wildlife habitat and facilitate the expansion and enhancement of hunting opportunities.

Objectives:
- Maintain or improve the connectivity and productivity of fish and wildlife habitats to support the UDWR population objectives.
- Provide quality habitat to support the expansion in range of identified, high-priority fish and wildlife species, as appropriate, on BLM-administered lands in the planning area throughout the life of the plan.
- Avoid negative impacts on crucial fish and wildlife habitats. Minimize and/or rectify detrimental impacts on wildlife habitat and populations where management impacts are
unavoidable.
- Coordinate with other agencies to manage native and nonnative predatory animals that pose a threat to the health or productivity of ecosystems.
- In concert with UDWR and other agencies, distribute wildlife, wildlife habitat, and recreational (e.g. fishing and hunting) outreach and educational material to the public on an annual basis.
- Coordinate with UDWR to establish and maintain Blue Ribbon fisheries. Current fisheries are maintained at Scofield Reservoir, Huntington Creek, Lower Fish Creek, and Upper Price River.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200881
WildlifeWL-1
Coordinate predator control with U.S. Department of Agriculture—Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife Services and UDWR as described in the existing memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the BLM and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife Services; predator control activities will continue to be conducted by Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife Services.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200881
WildlifeWL-2
Continue to recognize and implement, to the extent feasible, UDWR wildlife management plans (and associated revisions) and those of other cooperating agencies. Future plans and agreements will be considered for implementation on a case-by-case basis through applicable regulatory review.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200881-82
WildlifeBighorn SheepWL-3
Adhere to and use the recommendations found in the BLM Bighorn Sheep Rangewide Management Plan, 1999, as revised; the Utah BLM Statewide Desert Bighorn Sheep Management Plan, 1986, as revised; and the Management of Domestic Sheep in Bighorn Sheep Habitats, 1992, as revised.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200882
WildlifeWL-4
To the extent feasible, and in accordance with EO 13186, incorporate conservation measures as outlined in the Utah Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Strategy (Parrish et al. 2002), Utah Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy (Gorrell et al. 2005), and other scientific information into the BLM’s ongoing wildlife habitat program.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200882
WildlifeWL-5
Continue existing Habitat Management Plans (HMP). Allow or participate in research of all wildlife species and their habitats.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200882
WildlifeLeasingWL-6
The closure of the Gordon Creek Wildlife Management Area and the Desert Lake Waterfowl Management Area to leasing (including oil and gas) will continue.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200882
WildlifeLand UseWL-8
In the design of facilities associated with federal actions, incorporate concepts of habitat fragmentation and design those facilities to minimize the potential for increasing habitat fragmentation. Consider collocation of facilities, including utility corridors and oil and gas wells. Minimize the intrusion in wildlife habitats. Minimize road densities by reclaiming redundant roads when new roads access the same general area or when the intended purpose for the roads has been met and they are no longer necessary.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200882
WildlifeForageForage Allocation:
WL-18
Increase or decrease in available forage will be adjusted on a case-by-case basis to support rangeland health objectives.
WL-19
If UDWR acquired additional habitat or forage, or if studies indicated that additional forage was available naturally, the BLM will consider providing forage to support increased population objectives for wildlife.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200884
WildlifeLand UseWL-20
Dates of seasonal closures for surface disturbing activities within all crucial habitats will be revised and implemented to provide consistency across the entire planning area (Appendix R-3).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200884
WildlifeMigratory BirdsMigratory Bird Habitats:
WL-21
Efforts to comply with EO 13186, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds, will be integrated into programs for wildlife management and other resource uses. In addition, the BLM will continue to conserve habitat for all migratory birds and emphasize management of migratory birds listed on the BLM Sensitive Species List, the USFWS current list of “Birds of Conservation Concern” (BCC) (2002, or as updated), and the Partners in Flight (PIF) priority species. As specific habitat needs and population distribution of Sensitive Species, BCC, and PIF priority species are identified, the BLM will use adaptive management strategies to further conserve and avoid impacts on these species.
WL-22
Land uses within these priority habitats will be managed to promote regeneration, diverse age class distribution, and preservation or restoration of diverse understory to include forbs, grass, and shrub species.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200884
WildlifeTransplantsWL-23
The BLM will continue to cooperate with and provide support to UDWR in reestablishing fish or wildlife species into historic or suitable ranges as determined appropriate through NEPA analysis.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200884
WildlifeLand UseWL-25
Raptor management will be guided by the use of BMPs for raptors and their associated habitats in Utah (Appendix R-5) using seasonal and spatial buffers and mitigation to maintain and enhance raptor nesting and foraging habitat while allowing other resource uses.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200885
WildlifeLand UseWL-26
The BLM will manage land uses within occupied and historic white-tailed prairie dog colonies to preserve the habitat.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200885
FisheriesWL-27
The BLM will coordinate with UDWR to implement habitat improvement efforts to establish fisheries with native and non-native fish species.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200885
WildlifeFDN-2
Incorporate current Utah BLM Standards for Rangeland Health, as appropriate, across all resource programs as a minimum. Management prescriptions in the form of constraints to use, terms and conditions, and stipulations may be needed to sustain rangeland health and viability. Management prescriptions will consider the following:
- Wildlife management—During periods of prolonged dryness or drought to the extent that wildlife ungulate populations cannot be sustained because of competition for water and available forage, and overall animal health is compromised, the BLM will enter into discussions with the UDWR regarding herd numbers and overall management options to combat the effects of drought.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200894
WildlifeHabitatEvaluate areas with potential for Research Natural Area designation including Ben Lomond Peak (tall forb values), western portion of the Deseret Peak Wilderness (Great Basin community types and cryptogamic crusts).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
WildlifeHabitatMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide adequate habitat components for sustainable big game populations coordinated with State wildlife management agencies, private lands and other resource needs and priorities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide suitable habitat for prey species such as hares, squirrels, and small mammals.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifePopulation managementProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WildlifeHabitatEvaluate areas with potential for Research Natural Area designation including Ben Lomond Peak (tall forb values), western portion of the Deseret Peak Wilderness (Great Basin community types and cryptogamic crusts).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
WildlifeHabitatMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide adequate habitat components for sustainable big game populations coordinated with State wildlife management agencies, private lands and other resource needs and priorities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifeHabitatProvide suitable habitat for prey species such as hares, squirrels, and small mammals.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
WildlifePopulation managementProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WildlifeCoordinate resource management, habitat enhancement activities,
and projects with private, local, state, and federal organizations
and agencies to optimize environmental benefits. Establish
partnerships to protect, manage, and conserve wildlife habitat t
and species.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42435
WildlifeProtect resources essential to fish and wildlife habitat and
population.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
WildlifeProtect and enhance the quality of fish and wildlife habitat within
the framework of existing laws and management authority.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42437
WildlifeMaintain a healthy vegetative community through appropriate
management strategies.
Rockport State Park Resource Management Plan42438
WildlifeEnsure the protection of wildlife and habitat from adverse impacts of development by:
a. Coordinating with the Utah State Division of Wildlife Resources to map critical winter and summer ranges, birthing areas, and migration corridors.
Snyderville Basin General Plan23
WildlifeHabitat-improvement projects often take a few years to pay off, but over the long term, this effort will result in healthier deer populations statewide.Summit County Resource Assessment and Wasatch County Resource Assessment and Utah County Resource Assessment8
WildlifeAreas identified as being of special concern for habitat such as big game winter range, big game natal areas, Canada lynx denning areas, and greater sage grouse breeding areas in the Vernon and Strawberry Reservoir Management Areas are maintained and, where potential exists, improved or expanded. Disturbances in these areas are limited during critical periods for wildlife.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42409
WildlifeAdequate amounts and distribution of big game hiding and thermal cover are maintained. Adequate amounts of hiding cover for wildlife is retained around created openings and along roads where vegetative management activities are implemented.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
WildlifeMaintain stable and upward conditions in big game winter range habitats and improve downward trend sites.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
WildlifeWildlife travel corridors, riparian corridors, and key linkage routes are maintained and, where feasible, restored. Connections among large, contiguous blocks of suitable habitat are provided (e.g., key linkage routes for Canada lynx within and between Lynx Analysis Units [LAUs] and big game summer and winter range movements). Wildlife movement is facilitated within key linkage areas, considering highway crossing structures when feasible. Unified management direction is established through cooperation with other ownerships via habitat conservation plans, conservation easement or agreements, and land acquisitions.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Recreation and TourismRecreation Policy 1 – The Commission encourages efforts to improve public access facilities and increase opportunities for public access to Utah Lake.
Recreation Policy 2 – The Commission encourages development of recreation facilities that minimize adverse impacts to sensitive lands and resources and are consistent with the goals and objectives of the Master Plan.
Recreation Policy 3 – The Commission encourages the distribution of recreation opportunities around Utah Lake appropriate to population and needs.
Recreation Policy 4 – The Commission promotes the development of a variety of recreational opportunities at Utah Lake.
Utah Lake Master Plan3
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesRPI (Research, Protection, and Interpretation of Lands and Resources) Management Area
1) Manage cultural, historic, and paleontologic resources to allow research and/or interpretive activities, when possible, while protecting significant attributes of units from natural or human-caused degradation.
Manti-La Sal National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, 1986III-84
Fire ManagementReassess the existing education program to meet current and future needs
• Make sure literature is updated as necessary to incorporate current research information.
• Identify gaps in research and pursue funding to address research needs.
• Distribute materials to community members, individual landowners, public officials, interagency
partners and media for further dissemination and outreach.
• Maintain collaborative efforts with interagency partners to deliver and update information.
• Increase participation in state and national programs including Utah Living With Fire, Ready,
Set, Go!, Firewise USA and Fire-Adaptive Communities.
Utah Forest Action Plan17
Fire ManagementExpand planning opportunities
• Utilize existing tools to effectively and efficiently expand planning opportunities to the 625
identified Communities at Risk within the State of Utah.
• Train urban and volunteer fire departments to deliver the National Cohesive Strategy objectives and strategies to more efficiently reach those in the Wildland Urban Interface.
• Update and modify as needed the planning documents to meet the needs of the State of Utah
and intent of the Healthy Forest Restoration Act.
Utah Forest Action Plan17-18
Fire ManagementOrganizational development
• Provide technical and financial assistance to the 501c3, Utah Living with Fire.
• Standardize program delivery to improve consistency across the state.
• Provide cross discipline training to meet needs of individuals and other programs.
• Expand cross ownership contract sharing to reduce mitigation costs.
Utah Forest Action Plan
Fire ManagementWildland Fire legislation
• Update statues and codes to align more closely with current suppression management decision
tools.
• Establish a reward system through tax relief for preparing for wildland fire.
• Provide increased funding to help communities prepare for wildfire.
• Create a funding mechanism which allows the participation for all interested entities for wildland
fire suppression.
Utah Forest Action Plan
Fire ManagementProgram integration
• Increase communication and cooperation among programs within the Department of Natural
Resources and other State and Federal agencies.
• Utilize when appropriate other programs to meet the intent of the National Cohesive Strategy.
• Help to identify areas of potential integration through the Landscape Scale Restoration process.
Utah Forest Action Plan18
Fire ManagementProject identification and implementation
• Identify both federal and non-federal mitigation projects identified in the priority areas of the
Forest Action Plan, through the Interagency Fuels Committees and/or through the Catastrophic
Wildfire Reduction strategy process.
• Plan and complete projects that meet the needs of entire communities that focus on resilient
landscapes and fire adaptive communities.
• Incorporate a maintenance schedule for communities that are achievable and effective.
Utah Forest Action Plan18
Forest ManagementDevelop management direction for non-federal land use activities, utilizing standards for stewardship
and ecosystem management.
• Identify and target private forest landowners located in important forest resource areas for
assistance with stewardship or other planning purposes.
• Develop forest stewardship management plans concurrent with Division standards for private
forest landowners who demonstrate their commitment to proactive management.
• Include non-federal landowners in landscape-level, ecosystem-based planning where appropriate and acceptable to the landowner.
• Encourage and promote the use of
cooperative activities by other land
management agencies (i.e., state, private and
federal) employing ecosystem management,
forest health and stewardship principles.
• Where appropriate, encourage commodity
production from private lands within the
context of multiple-use and sustained yield.
Utah Forest Action Plan30-31
Forest ManagementPlan, develop and implement new information and
education programs to inform Utah citizens of the
importance of balanced conservation.
• Develop and present workshops for private
forest landowners.
• Participate in local community and agency planning processes.
• Demonstrate the concepts of ecosystem, stewardship, recycling and urban tree care through
public presentations and interpretive sites.
Utah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementMaintain or expand existing information and education programs.
• Participate in youth-oriented education programs and activities (i.e. Natural Resource days)
• Cooperate and participate in ecosystem field days and career days.
• Have timely input into work planning of USU’s Landowner Education.
Utah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementDevelop partnerships and cooperative relationships with organizations and individuals who share our
goals.
• Formalize current and future relationships with agreements that specify desired results.
Utah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementUse all available management tools, including forest industry, to restore and maintain healthy
ecosystems.
• Design and implement demonstration areas.
• Whenever possible, utilize local mills and forest industry professionals to implement forest
stewardship projects.
Utah Forest Action Plan31
Forest ManagementDevelop and maintain appropriate natural resource databases.
• Inventory and catalog existing data on natural resources.
• Adopt training, facilities, hardware and staff for using GIS.
• Develop a process for acquiring and managing necessary resource data.
• Utilize current and emerging technologies to analyze natural resource data in support of the
Division’s annual plan of work.
Utah Forest Action Plan31
WildlifeCoordination occurs with federal, tribal, and state wildlife management agencies to identify and manage wild ungulate impacts that prevent attainment of Forest Plan management direction.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42410
Water Quality and HydrologyDevelop management direction for non-federal land use activities, utilizing standards for stewardship
and ecosystem management.
• Continue the development of educational publications for landowners regarding sylvicultural
practices, Forest Water Quality Guidelines (FWQG) and forest health issues.
• Pursue opportunities for application and adoption of FWQG and encourage landowners and
industry to include FWQG in all sylvicultural activities.
• Continue to implement monitoring programs to determine effectiveness of the Forest Practices
Act, FWQG and Forest Stewardship Management Plans.
• Pursue opportunities to develop watershed assistance programs for Utah’s non-federal forested
lands through available funding sources.
• Utilize grants to support native tree planting efforts along riparian areas within municipalities.
• Provide technical assistance to developers and city planners to help reduce impervious surfaces
and utilize trees and other plant materials for water filtration and to slow run off rates.
Resources required: Forestry Program Administrator, Forest Stewardship Coordinator, Urban and
Utah Forest Action Plan48
Forest ManagementUtah’s forested resources are used to meet public needs while being appropriately managed to
provide sustainability for future generations.
• Provide sufficient technical assistance, training, information, databases and publications to allow
land managers and/or private landowners to effectively deal with insect and disease issues using
integrated pest management techniques.
Utah Forest Action Plan54
Forest ManagementInformation for all forested lands in Utah is available to the State Forester, State and Federal
Legislators, other decision makers and land mangers; allowing appropriate actions in high-priority
areas to enhance the health of Utah natural resources.
• Coordinate detection efforts with cooperators for significant forest insects and disease and
monitor trends in forest health conditions on non-industrial private and state forest lands.
• Collaborate with partners to participate in the national Forest Health Monitoring Program (FHM).
• Provide input in the development of the national Forest Inventory and Analysis Core Field Guide.
Utah Forest Action Plan55
Forest ManagementUtah natural resources are minimally affected by introduced, exotic species due to aggressive
interagency cooperation to prevent introduction and quick action to reduce populations if introduced.
• Collaborate with partners to minimize the impacts of introduced pests.
Utah Forest Action Plan55
Forest ManagementIncrease project benefits through proximity to managed lands.
• Coordinate with other State, Federal, Tribal and private entities to identify project work in
proximity to existing management plans and/or conserved lands.
• Give priority to projects and planning efforts adjacent to or in close proximity to existing Federal
and Tribal lands and to private lands with existing Forest Stewardship Plans and/or conservation
easements.
• Maintain and update existing Division Forest Stewardship Plan and conservation easement
databases yearly to ensure current information is being utilized.
Utah Forest Action Plan58
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsIssues facing Utah’s Urban & Community Forests are:
• Minimal public awareness of community forestry including the values and benefits of community
trees.
• Majority of the communities are unaware of how to plan, organize and manage local community
forestry programs and uneducated on proper tree selection, regulation and maintenance of trees
in the community environment.
• Majority of the communities have not established a budget for the management of public trees.
• Many communities do not have a tree inventory or tree management plan in place.
• Most of tree maintenance personnel, both public and commercial, are inadequately trained and
equipped to provide proper tree maintenance.
• Wood waste from urban trees is underutilized.
• Trees are often in conflict with overhead power transmission lines.
• Increasing development of communities in wildland-urban interface zone.
• Increasing urban infrastructure without consideration for public trees..
Utah Forest Action Plan66
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsDevelop and maintain community forests and management plans.
• Establish and maintain effective contacts with each community.
• Foster self-sustaining municipal community forestry programs.
• Provide cost-share incentives for UCF development to communities.
• Create innovative approaches to tree inventories that will work for Utah communities.
• Strive to achieve healthy urban forests.
Utah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsCoordinate government, citizens, corporations, institutions and non-profit organizations through
partnerships to maximize efforts to improve the condition of the urban and community forests.
• Establish and maintain a common forum for all partners
• Foster private support of community forestry programs.
• Provide educational outreach.
Utah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsConnect urban forestry benefits to diverse environmental issues.
• Demonstrate city trees relevance in air and water quality.
• Explore urban forests impact on climate change and heat island effects.
Utah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsCultivate an appreciation and understanding for the social, economic, environmental and aesthetic
values of trees, forests and related resources in cities and communities.
• Develop information programs for the public.
• Promote Arbor Day.
• Conduct or participate in mass public events.
• Develop Urban & Community Forestry information for youth audiences.
Utah Forest Action Plan67
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsDevelop and encourage the profession of urban forestry among partners through technology transfer,
education and training.
• Analyze training needs of the urban forestry profession.
• Develop and promote training and education program for urban forestry professionals.
• Support research in Urban and Community Forestry.
Utah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsSeek support from all levels of government for the Urban and Community Forestry Program.
• Maintain state funds for the UCF program.
• Engage and educate state legislators.
• Support local and regional legislation that promotes urban trees.
Utah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsCoordinate with other State and Private Forestry Programs.
• Identify unique UCF projects that would lend themselves to the competitive grant process.
• Explore forest health issues in urban environments.
• Work with WUI communities on firewise landscapes.
• Tie community water quality issues to urban and wildland forests.
• Assist with public education on Forest Legacy easements.
• Combat invasive species along urban river ways and natural areas.
Utah Forest Action Plan68
Forest ManagementUrban ForestsPeriodic assessment of program initiatives and activities to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of
program directions.
• Establish and maintain monitoring system and/or adapt federal performance measures system to
monitor program.
• Evaluate program effectiveness.
Utah Forest Action Plan68
Water Quality and HydrologyIn order to protect and enhance water quality and water supplies, priority will be given to:
• Parcels on which land management directly affects streams and other waterways that support
domestic and agricultural water supplies.
Parcels owned by landowners who will identify and seek to minimize past and potential sources
of non-point source pollution, including erosion potential and sedimentation resulting from road
construction.
Utah Forest Action Plan72
Forest ManagementIn order to prevent future conversion of forest land and forest resources, priority will be given:
• Parcels in danger of conversion to non-forest uses within five years.
• Parcels for which there is a cost share match available.
• Parcels in danger of being over-harvested or degraded through surface mineral development.
• Parcels containing 100 or more available acres.
• Parcels held by owners who will preclude parcel divisions and non-forest development projects
on parcels included in the Program. Appropriate exemptions may be negotiated for maintaining
compatible development.
Utah Forest Action Plan73
WildlifeRaptor mortality associated with existing and proposed power lines is reduced (see Suggested Practices for Raptor Protection on Power Lines [Raptor Research Foundation 1996] or other applicable direction for guidance).Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
Riparian AreasIn order to protect riparian areas, priority will be given to:
• Parcels owned by landowners who will encourage regeneration of healthy stands of native
species in riparian areas where they are/were naturally occurring.
• Parcels owned by landowners who will identify and protect sensitive riparian habitats, including
stream banks.
• Parcels including over 300 feet of river or wetland shoreline.
• Parcels including a minimum 80 foot strip of native trees and shrubs as a natural buffer and
sediment filter.
Utah Forest Action Plan73
Forest ManagementIn order to maintain and restore natural ecosystem functions, priority will be given to:
• Parcels which include healthy forests, including a natural species mix and a genetically sound mix
of trees within the species represented on the parcel.
• Parcels owned by landowners who will manage the parcel or key portions of it to restore a
natural mix of forest species, structure and stages across the landscape.
• Parcels owned by landowners who will utilize prescribed fire or other practices to restore more
naturally functioning landscapes.
Utah Forest Action Plan73
Forest ManagementIn order to maintain forest sustainability and the cultural and economic vitality of rural communities,
priority will be given to:
• Parcels which could contribute to the development or sustainability of local and regional wood
products industries.
• Parcels owned by landowners who will work cooperatively to develop a long-term forest
stewardship plan for their property.
• Parcels which could contribute to the continuance of wildlife production and livestock grazing on
forested lands.
Utah Forest Action Plan74
Forest ManagementWhile most of the nation’s forests are in private ownership, Utah’s forests are mostly managed by
federal agencies. This limits how much direct impact state agencies can have on managing forests for
climate change. However, broader efforts can include:
• Conduct education & outreach on the importance of healthy forests in mitigating climate change.
• Develop projects and policies that promote healthy forests and reduce catastrophic wildfire,
thereby maintaining forests as a carbon sinks and not carbon sources.
• Promote the increased use of woody biomass as a renewable and carbon neutral energy source.
• Develop a funding mechanism to achieve these goals, including a Wood Utilization Coordinator
position within the Division of Forestry, Fire & State Lands.
Utah Forest Action Plan76
AgriculturePrime, important and unique agricultural lands and soils are vital to sustain human life. The protection of prime agricultural lands should be given the same consideration as other lands by federal agencies, the State of Utah, and its political subdivisions. It is important these lands be conserved for our food security needs.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureDevelop legislative policy that provides protection for important agricultural lands and soils equal to wetlands in order to sustain food security.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureFund conservation easement legislation that gives priority to important productive agricultural lands with prime soils or important farmlands. Dedicate greenbelt rollback monies to conservation easements or other productive agricultural uses within the counties where rollback funds are generated. Enable local conservation districts to make recommendations to county commissions related to the use of annual rollback funds.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide new monies to the LeRay McAllister Fund to match funds for conservation easements on productive agricultural lands with prime state or locally-important soils.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureCreate a separate greenbelt designation for smaller-acreage productive operations.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAmend Utah law to fund mitigation of agriculture lands lost to eminent domain.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAmend Utah law to encourage energy producers to use directional drilling and other techniques to minimize the surface impacts on agricultural lands caused by energy development.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide a $1,000,000 increase in money from the State of Utah General Fund for invasive species mitigation, especially weed control.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureConsider other sources of funding for weed control tied to the spread of weed seeds including: funds earned from unclaimed property, trailer licenses, noxious weed impact fees from recreational ATVs, gravel pit fee assessments, a portion of the sportsmen fees gathered by the Utah Department of Natural Resources, and other appropriate sources.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureProvide $1,000,000 of on-going state funding to increase landscape-scale coordinated resource management planning. Where feasible, this money will facilitate the development of grazing management plans, watering facilities, fencing improvements, weed control, and other grazing improvement projects.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureAugment existing funding or develop alternative funding sources to improve and update irrigation system technologies.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureEnhance the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Big Game Depredation program to mitigate crop and other damages caused by big game to farm and ranch land.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureIncrease the capacity of the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food to directly participate in the planning of state and local infrastructure needs when agricultural lands are an issue.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureWork with the Governor‘s Office of Economic Development to improve local processing capacity.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureDevelop incubator kitchens in each county to provide small agricultural companies places to test new products.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture8
AgricultureEncourage local governments to recognize the importance of agricultural land uses in their general plans, policies and ordinances.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage local governments to develop specialized local food security plans that work toward these goals.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgriculturePartner with USU Extension, conservation districts, county and city officials, and other interested parties to provide technical assistance for conservation.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage the federal government to eliminate subsidies for agriculture-related products diverted from the food supply for energy production.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureUrge the federal government to allow greater state agricultural environmental stewardship oversight using the traditional educational and voluntary programs of the USDA, conservation districts, and the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food as models.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureCreate federal block grants to fight invasive species on federal and state lands.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgriculturePass a resolution calling on Congress to create a new national agriculture guest worker program.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport federal legislation to provide funding for improved agriculture irrigation infrastructure.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureUpdate the inventory of invasive species in Utah, more clearly define the role of county weed boards in statute, and identify and prioritize weed control measures.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEstablish outreach and education campaigns to inform the public about how to minimize the spread of invasive species.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureImprove agricultural product distribution capacity by supporting the existing Utah’s Own program to provide: Incentives and/or legislation to encourage local stores, restaurants, school lunch programs, state agencies, and other public sector services to buy Utah products first, (when available); A fund to facilitate central distribution points for the purchase of local Utah agricultural products; Promotion of innovative agricultural practices and products in our partnerships with food buying groups, restaurant groups and emerging businesses.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureIncrease the funding and effectiveness of predator control, and allot reasonable and sufficient compensation to agricultural producers for wildlife impacts that may disrupt agricultural production.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport Utah House Bill 116: an ample, sustainable and legal workforce is critical for our farms and ranches.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureOppose using E-verification to verify worker status until federal guest worker laws are in place.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureWork with Utah State University and support groups to develop and implement planning and farm transfer programs that will complement retirement and insurance programs for farmers and ranchers.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureSupport efforts to match farmers without identified successors, with young farmers seeking opportunities to purchase or lease farms or ranches.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureEncourage the financial community to finance farm ownership transfer.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
AgricultureWork with conservation districts in a statewide effort to map Utah irrigation systems, and educate the general public about the irrigation needs of agriculture and the benefits of well-maintained irrigation delivery systems.Agriculture Sustainability Task Force Report: Planning for Agriculture9
Fire ManagementEcologyIncrease the active use of fire to return fire dependent ecosystems to proper functioning and to reduce hazardous fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Fire ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, sylvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Fire ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Fire ManagementEcologyTake timely actions to restore proper functioning of ecosystems after wildfire.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Air QualityStandardsEnsure National Forest management activities result in meeting state and federal air quality standards, and comply with local, state and federal air quality regulations and requirements.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationFully integrate the Heritage Program into land and resource management.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCoordination/educationImplement the National Heritage Strategy emphasizing the need for non-project inventories (Section 110) and public education and awareness programs.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesInventory/monitoring/modelingInventory, evaluate, protect and enhance heritage sites and landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Fire ManagementPreparednessIncrease public understanding and support of the active use of fire to improve watershed and habitat conditions and reduce fuels.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyReduce hazardous fuels (prescribed fire, sylvicultural and mechanical treatments) with emphasis on interface communities (wildland/urban) and increase proactive participation of communities at risk.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Forest ManagementEcologyRestore or maintain fire-adapted ecosystems (consistent with land uses, historic fire regimes, and other Forest Plan direction) through wildland fire use, prescribed fire, timber harvest or mechanical treatments.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain and/or restore tall forb communities to mid seral or potential natural community (PNC) status.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore as mature and old age classes 40% of total conifer and 30% of total aspen cover types, well distributed across the landscape.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyMaintain or restore species composition, such that the species that occupy any given site are predominantly native species in the kind and amount that were historically distributed across the landscapes.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Forest ManagementEcologyProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Forest ManagementProductsUse timber harvest where allowed, to contribute to the economy while achieving properly functioning conditions of vegetation and watersheds.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Land AccessPlanningAcquire access and rights-of-way for general public and administrative use.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land AccessPlanningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land AccessPlanningMinimize the addition of special use encumbered areas of National Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land AccessPlanningProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Land AccessRight of WayEfforts will be made to obtain right-of-ways for public access to the National Forest. Existing right-of ways will be maintained. A priority for right-of-ways will be the linkages to community trails along the front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-135
Land AccessRight of WayRegional trails, such as the Great Western Trail and the Bonneville Shoreline Trail will be recognized and valued as unique opportunities to develop recreation corridors across multiple ownerships in the face of expanding development across potential trail corridors.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-160
Land AccessRight of WayOgden area in cooperation with the cities of North Ogden, Pleasant View and Willard. Needed access and rights of way will be maintained or acquired to complete the Bonneville Shoreline trail along the Wasatch Front.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest4-146
Land UseStandards/zoningContinue to allow for most currently authorized uses while encouraging opportunities to phase out or move to private lands uses with limited public benefits.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Land UseUtility corridorsUtilize currently designated utility corridors fully for power transmission lines of 66kV or greater and oil and gas pipelines 10” or greater.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-25
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRecognize and manage for the importance of scenic forest landscapes to overall recreation settings as well as to the quality of life for communities adjacent to the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Land UseVisual/aestheticsRestore, maintain or enhance landscape scenic integrity across the variety of landscape character themes found on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Law EnforcementIncrease Forest Service field presence in key areas, improve effectiveness of public information on restrictions, and increase participation of individuals and organized groups in monitoring uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Livestock and GrazingManage livestock grazing levels and operations on suitable lands for sustainable forage use within properly functioning conditions.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Noxious WeedsGreatly reduce known infestations of noxious weeds and rigorously prevent their introduction and/or spread.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Recreation and TourismCoordination/partnershipsInvolve Forest users in developing strategies for managing recreation to meet desired future conditions and address recreation pressures and demands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismInterpretation/educationIncrease Forest recreation user stewardship of resources and strengthen awareness of user ethics for reducing resource and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismParks/facilitiesEncourage private enterprise to develop recreational facilities on and off the Forest that provide for a range of recreation opportunities (e.g. camping and picnicking areas, trailheads, and interpretive sites).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismPlanningManage for an array of recreation opportunities and settings to improve the quality of life for a variety of Forest recreation users. Balance growth and expansion of recreation by managing within the capability of sustainable ecosystems found on the Forest for today and the future.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismTourismUse ski area associated private and public developed recreation facilities to provide world-class skiing and mountain resort opportunities while contributing to the economy.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-23
Recreation and TourismTrailsAcquire lands or easements needed to facilitate Bonneville Shoreline and Great Western Trails development.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-24
Recreation and TourismTrailsManage trails to provide desired recreation opportunities for recreation users and to meet Forest Service standards.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage recreation use of undeveloped areas on the forest to provide for desirable opportunities while preventing or reducing resource impacts and social conflicts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsManage uses of new recreational technologies to provide for opportunities while preventing or minimizing negative social and/or resource impacts on the Forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-22
Recreation and TourismUser groupsProvide a variety of opportunities for motorized access while avoiding or reducing undesirable social and resource impacts.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Recreation and TourismUser groupsWork closely with city, county, state and tribal governments to provide for integrated, coordinated development and management (including enforcement) of OHV activities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-21
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain or restore aquatic and riparian habitats, through recognition and management of Riparian Habitat Conservation Areas (defined in Glossary) for metapopulations of cutthroat trout, recognizing the relative degree to which these fish depend on National Forest lands and conditions of these habitats off-forest.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore habitat to sustain populations of well-distributed native and desired non-native plant, vertebrate, and invertebrate populations that contribute to viability of riparian-dependent communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatProvide for connectivity of continuous large patches of forested habitat for interior forest-dependent and wide-ranging species (such as lynx, wolverine and migratory birds).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesHabitatMaintain pollinators and minimize impacts to pollinators or their habitats.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationImprove Forest users’ understanding of the values of and potential human impacts to biodiversity and viability of species.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-20
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesInterpretation/educationIncrease understanding of and support research on the distribution, ecology, and threats to plant species at risk, nonvascular plants and rare plant communities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain or restore viability of populations of species at risk, Watch List Plants, and rare communitiesRevised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityMaintain viability of species-at-risk (including endangered, threatened and sensitive species and unique communities).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityManage Forest Service sensitive species to prevent them from being classified as threatened or endangered and where possible provide for delisting as sensitive (FSM 2670).Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-19
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesPopulation viabilityProvide for sustained diversity of species at the genetic, populations, community and ecosystem levels. Maintain communities within their historic range of variation that sustains habitats for viable populations of species. Restore or maintain hydrologic functions. Reduce potential for uncharacteristic high-intensity wildfires, and insect epidemics. To achieve sustainable ecosystems, meet properly functioning condition (PFC) criteria for all vegetation types that occur in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Focus on approximating natural disturbances and processes by restoring composition, age class diversity, patch sizes, and patterns for all vegetation types.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or improve water quality to provide stable and productive riparian and aquatic ecosystems.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore overall watershed health (proper functioning of physical, biological and chemical conditions). Provide for long term soil productivity. Watershed health should be addressed across administrative and political boundaries.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain and/or restore stream channel integrity, channel processes, and sediment regimes (timing, volume, character of sediment input/transport) under which riparian & aquatic ecosystems developed.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyAquatic ecologyMaintain water in streams, lakes, and wetlands of adequate quantity and quality to provide for instream flows and existing downstream uses including support of healthy riparian & aquatic habitats, stability & effective function of stream channels, ability to route flood discharges, and to maintain recreation opportunities.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyQuality/standardsProtect waters meeting or surpassing State water quality standards by planning and designing land management activities to protect
water quality.
Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedDesign and implement watershed management programs and plans that will restore water quality and watershed function to support beneficial uses.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedMaintain and/or restore soil productivity to improve watershed functioning through managing ground cover, soil compaction, and vegetation.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershedIdentify [watershed] areas not in properly functioning condition. Improve plant species composition, ground cover and age class diversity in these areas.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-17
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore natural timing and variability of water table elevation in spring sources, meadows & wetlands.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WetlandsMaintain and/or restore diversity, productivity, vigor, and regenerative capacity of native and desired non-native riparian and wetland plant communities to provide an amount and distribution of large woody debris characteristic of natural aquatic & riparian ecosystems; provide adequate summer & winter thermal regulation; and to help achieve rates of surface erosion and channel migration characteristic of those under which desired communities develop.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-18
WildernessManage Wildernesses recognizing differences in population proximity and consequent role in providing wilderness experiences for more people.Revised Forest Plan Wasatch-Cache National Forest 4-25
WildlifeAvian mortality is reduced by minimizing the construction of tower facilities, including lighted towers, on communication sites.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
WildlifeMaintain active beaver colonies in at least 80 percent of 6th level Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) watersheds within each management area, except in the Vernon and West Sheeprock Management Areas on the Vernon Unit.Uinta National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan42411
WildlifeThe Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands intends to support the Division of Wildlife Resources in the Wildlife Action Plan strategies.Utah Forest Action Plan41
WildlifeIn order to protect wildlife habitat and maintain habitat connectivity and related values needed to
ensure biodiversity, priority will be given to:
• Parcels located adjacent to public lands managed for wildlife habitat.
• Parcels which currently exhibit connective habitats, migratory corridors, habitat linkages and
areas that reduce biological isolation or could be managed to do so.
• Parcels held by owners who will identify and protect areas with species or communities of
concern and seek to manage for key habitats.
• Parcels held by landowners who will maintain and/or restore forest cover and structure to
provide habitat connectivity for the range of wildlife species which would normally populate the
area.
Utah Forest Action Plan73
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Goal: Conserve, improve, and restore mule deer habitat throughout the state with
emphasis on crucial ranges.
Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan18
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Objective 1: Maintain mule deer habitat throughout the state by protecting and enhancing existing crucial habitats and mitigating for losses due to natural and human impacts.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan18
Air QualityManage BLM programs to comply with and support tribal, local, State, and federal laws, regulations, and implementation plans pertaining to air quality.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200864
Air QualityMaintain existing air quality and air quality-related values (e.g., visibility) by ensuring that all authorized uses on public lands comply with and support federal, State, and local laws and regulations for protecting air quality.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200864
Air QualityAQ-1
Manage all BLM and BLM-authorized activities to maintain air quality within the thresholds established by the National and State of Utah Ambient Air Quality Standards, or to the appropriate standards set by the entity with jurisdiction. Continue to keep the area as attainment, meet prevention of significant deterioration Class II limits, and protect the Class I air quality related values of the National Parks (i.e., Arches, Canyonlands, and Capitol Reef).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200864
Air QualityFire ManagementAQ-2
Ensure that prescribed burns will be approved and timed to maximize smoke dispersal.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200864
Air QualityFire ManagementAQ-4
The BLM will continue to work cooperatively with the Utah Airshed Group to manage emissions from wildland and prescribed fire activities.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200864
Air QualityAQ-5
National Ambient Air Quality Standards are enforced by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Air Quality, with EPA oversight. Special requirements to reduce potential air quality impacts will be considered on a case-by-case basis in processing land use authorizations.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200864
Air QualityAQ-6
The BLM will utilize BMPs and site specific mitigation measures, when appropriate, based on site specific conditions, to reduce emissions and enhance air quality.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200864
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesPreserve and protect significant cultural resources and ensure that they are available for appropriate uses by present and future generations (FLPMA Sections 103(c), 201(a), and 202(c); National Historic Preservation Act [NHPA] Section 110(a); Archaeological Resource Protection Act [ARPA] Section 14(a)).

Identify priority geographic areas for new field inventory, based on a probability for unrecorded significant resources, to reduce imminent threats from natural or human-caused deterioration or potential conflict with other resource uses (ARPA Section 14(a); NHPA Sections 106 and 110).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200873
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesPaleontologicalGoals:
- Facilitate suitable scientific, educational, and recreational uses of fossils.
- Ensure that significant fossils are not inadvertently damaged, destroyed, or removed from public ownership.
- Foster public awareness and appreciation of the area’s paleontological heritage.

Objectives:
- Locate and evaluate paleontological resources and protect these resources when appropriate.
- Promote and facilitate scientific investigation of fossil resources. Paleontological Resource Use permits will be issued for scientific study as appropriate. Approve collection of vertebrate fossils under a permit issued to qualified individuals who agree to place all specimens and data in an approved repository.
- Support and provide public education and interpretive opportunities for paleontological resources, where appropriate. Such appropriate opportunities could include agreements with visitor information providers (such as the Dinosaur Diamond Partnership), use of special designations, such as the Dinosaur Diamond National Scenic Byway and the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, or development of landscape level interpretive sites.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200876
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesPaleontologicalPAL-3
Manage the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry as a significant scientific and public education resource, as guided by an activity level planning document.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200876
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesCultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesGoals:
- Manage the Old Spanish Trail National Historic Trail (OST) for long-term heritage, recreational, and educational values.
- Manage National Landmarks to maintain or enhance the values for which they were designated.

Objectives:
- Develop and maintain an OST Plan within five years from signature of the ROD.
- Manage public lands to maintain or enhance the recreational opportunities associated with byways and backways for the purposes for which they were designated.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008143
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesLand UseOld Spanish Trail: Lost Springs Wash/Trail Springs Wash Segment (13 miles total, 11 miles on BLM):
TRA-7
Preserve the historic character of the landscape much as it existed at the time the trail was in use (1829–1848) while providing for recreation opportunities and other resources values. Manage this segment as follows:
- Work with Utah State Parks and Recreation, Green River City, Emery County, Native American Tribes, and other interested parties to provide interpretive, educational, and
recreation opportunities for this segment
- Retain public lands; acquire State inholdings
- Manage primarily for non-motorized recreation uses
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- VRM Class III (existing)
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Closed to mineral materials (sand and gravel) sales
- Avoid ROWs except where the designated corridor crosses the trail
- Authorize SRPs only for heritage tours and reenactments in this segment
- Consider ROS inventory in preparing the activity plan for this segment
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008144
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesLand UseOld Spanish Trail: Green River Crossing (via Cottonwood Wash) to Big Flat Segment (43 miles total, 31 miles on BLM)
TRA-8
Preserve the historic character of the landscape much as it existed at the time the trail was in use (1829–1848) while providing for recreation opportunities and other resources values. Manage this segment as follows:
- Work with Utah State Parks and Recreation, Green River City, Emery County, Native American Tribes, and other interested parties on providing interpretive, educational, and
recreation opportunities for this segment
- Retain public lands; acquire State inholdings
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Manage for motorized recreation uses
- Manage for VRM objectives (overlaps VRM Classes I, II, and III)
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to minor constraints (timing limitations, CSU, lease notices) (Map R-25)
- ROWs allowed within the designated corridor
- Consider ROS inventory in preparing the activity plan for this segment.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008144
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesLand UseOld Spanish Trail: Big Flat to Walker Flat (Emery/Sevier County Line) Segment (67 miles total, 26 miles on BLM):
TRA-9
Manage this segment as follows:
- Work with Utah State Parks and Recreation, Green River City, Emery County, Native American Tribes, and other interested parties on providing interpretive, educational, and
recreation opportunities for this segment
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Manage for motorized recreation uses
- ROWs allowed within the designated corridor.
- Manage for VRM objectives in areas open to oil and gas leasing subject to minor constraints (Map R-25) (these areas of overlap are VRM Class III).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008145
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesTRA-12
Manage the Nine Mile Canyon State Scenic Backway/BLM Backcountry Byway to protect and preserve the prehistoric and historic values that contribute to the landscape for which the byway was established.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008145
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesTRA-13
The Dinosaur Diamond National Scenic Byway was established for its intrinsic natural values.
TRA-14
Promote public appreciation of and education on the paleontological resources found along the Dinosaur Diamond Byway.
TRA-15
Use the byway to provide a variety of heritage recreational opportunities related to paleontological, cultural, and historic values at sites along the byway including:
- Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry
- Nine Mile Canyon
- Buckhorn Panel
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008145-146
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesTRA-22
Manage the Desolation Canyon NHL for heritage tourism under the prescriptions of the Desolation and Gray Canyons of the Green River Management Plan, SRMA, WSA, and suitable WSR segment (Map R-32).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008147
Cultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesTRA-23
Manage the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry NNL under the prescriptions of the SRMA and ACEC (Map R-32).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008147
Energy ResourcesNine Mile Canyon SRMANine Mile Canyon SRMA
REC-60
Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to minor constraints (timing limitations, controlled surface use, lease notices), except where the Nine Mile Canyon ACEC overlaps the SRMA. Where this overlap exists in the SRMA, the area will be open to leasing with major constraints (NSO).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008111
Energy ResourcesWind EnergyLAR-32
Any wind energy exploration and development will be subject to a site-specific NEPA analysis. Wind energy development is granted under a ROW. The BLM will consider proposals for ROWs for wind energy exploration and development on a case-by-case basis.
LAR-33
The BLM will encourage wind energy development in areas where impacts on vegetation coverage and other resources will be minimized.
LAR-34
The BLM will not permit wind energy development in NSO areas or areas unavailable to leasing for oil and gas, VRM Class I and II areas, and migratory bird breeding habitat and raptor nesting complexes.
LAR-35
The BLM will not permit wind energy development in the five non-WSA lands with wilderness characteristics managed to protect, preserve, and maintain their wilderness characteristics.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008121
Energy ResourcesSolar EnergySolar Energy Development:
LAR-36
Any solar energy exploration and development will be subject to a site-specific NEPA analysis. Solar energy development will be granted under an ROW. The BLM will consider proposals for ROWs for solar energy exploration and development on a case-by-case basis.
LAR-37
The BLM will encourage solar energy development in areas where impacts on vegetation and other resources will be minimized through appropriate mitigation measures because of inherent properties of the site.
LAR_38
The BLM will not permit solar energy development in NSO areas, areas unavailable to oil and gas leasing, and VRM Class I and II areas.
LAR-39
The BLM will not permit solar energy development in the five non-WSA lands with wilderness characteristics managed to protect, preserve, and maintain their wilderness characteristics.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008121
Energy ResourcesGoals:
- Provide opportunities for mineral exploration and development under the mining and mineral leasing laws subject to legal requirements to protect other resource values.
- Provide mineral materials needed for community and economic purposes.
- Identify areas that will require special mineral management to manage salable mineral permitting and development, mining claim location, prospecting and mining operations on BLM-administered lands within the planning area in a manner that will not cause undue and unnecessary degradation and will minimize impacts on other resources.
- Support the need for domestic energy resources by managing and conserving the mineral resources without compromising the long-term health and diversity of public lands.

Objectives:
- Maintain coal leasing, exploration, and development within the planning area while minimizing impacts to other resource values.
- Maintain opportunities for the collection of subsurface geological (geophysical) data to aid in the exploration of oil and gas resources.
- Maintain opportunities to lease other solid leasable minerals while minimizing impacts to other resource values.
- Manage oil and gas leasing, exploration and development while minimizing impacts to other resource values.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008123
Energy ResourcesOil shaleMIN-1
Review the withdrawal created under EO 5327, April 15, 1930, and Public Land Order 4522, September 13, 1968, in Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado. The oil shale lands were originally withdrawn from all disposition (including oil shale leasing) pending evaluation and classification. Later, orders allowed leasing for oil and gas and sodium. Before any oil shale can be leased, the withdrawal must be lifted. The BLM will review this withdrawal and recommend modification, retention, and revocation of the oil shale withdrawal. In the meantime, the withdrawal will continue and the area will remain available for leasing in accordance with the RMP. About 171,000 acres of low potential and moderate oil shale potential areas (Map R-23) in the northeast corner of the PFO will remain within an oil shale withdrawal.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008123
Energy ResourcesGeothermalMLE-1
Consider any geothermal leasing, plan of operations for exploration, or application for development on a case-by-case basis.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008125
Energy ResourcesCoalMLE-2
Map R-24 shows areas that will be available for further coal leasing considerations.
MLE-3
Use the coal unsuitability determinations as identified in Appendix R-13. WSAs will be unsuitable for future consideration for coal leasing, but other areas will be suitable for leasing, with other restrictions.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008125
Energy ResourcesMLE-5
The BLM has identified LUP leasing allocations for all lands within the PFO. In addition, the Proposed RMP describes specific lease stipulations (Appendix R-3) that apply to a variety of different resources including raptors, greater sage-grouse, and big game habitat, as well as program-related Best Management Practices (Appendix R-14) that may be applied on a case-by-case, site-specific basis to prevent, minimize, or mitigate resource impacts (Map R-8).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008125
Energy ResourcesOil and gas leasingMLE-7
Allow leasing of oil and gas on lands within the PFO with oil shale/tar sands potential only for conventional oil and gas and coalbed natural gas. Oil shale/tar sands will be specifically excluded from the lease. This RMP will be amended upon completion of the Programmatic EIS for oil shale and tar sands resources leasing on lands administered by the BLM in Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming (Map R-23).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008126
Energy ResourcesCoalMLE-8
Acknowledge future development potential for coal resources in areas where coalbed natural gas development is taking place.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008126
Energy ResourcesOil and gas leasingMLE-9
Oil and gas leasing management will be conducted shown on Map R-25.
- Areas open to leasing subject to the standard terms and conditions of the lease form (1,161,000 acres)
- Areas open to leasing subject to moderate constraints (timing limitations; CSU, and lease notices) (467,000 acres)
- Areas open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO) (282,000 acres)
- Areas unavailable to leasing (569,000 acres)
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008126
Energy ResourcesOil and gas leasingMLE-10
The Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 closed lands within BLM WSAs to oil, gas, or geothermal leasing (30 USC 226-3(a)2).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008126
Fire ManagementGoals:
- Manage fire and fuels to protect life, firefighter safety, property, and critical resource values.
- Reduce the threat of wildfire in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI).
- Manage fire and fuels, where appropriate, to restore natural systems to their desired future condition, considering the interrelated social and economic components.
- Suppress wildfires to minimize cost considering firefighter and public safety, benefits, and values to be protected, consistent with resource objectives.

Objectives:
- Using Fire Regime Condition Class (FRCC), establish landscape-level fire management initiatives that include a description of areas and the identification of acreages to illustrate where fire suppression actions are warranted; where fire may be restored to the ecosystem through wildland fire use for resource benefit; and where treatments may be used involving prescribed fire and non-fire fuel reduction, maintenance and/or rehabilitation.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200889
Fire ManagementThreatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesFIRE-1
Minimize wildfire size and frequency in sagebrush communities where greater sage-grouse habitat objectives will not be met if fire occurs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200889
Fire ManagementFIRE-2
To reduce risks and restore ecosystems through fuels management, allow the following fuels management tools throughout the planning area unless otherwise restricted: wildland fire use; prescribed fire; and mechanical, chemical, seeding, and biological actions.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200889
Fire ManagementFIRE-3
As conditions allow, employ the least intrusive fire suppression method over more intrusive methods. For example, wildland fire use is the preferred method of treatment. Where conditions are not appropriate for wildland fire use, prescribed burning will be the preferred method. Where prescribed burning is not feasible, non-fire fuel treatments will become the preferred method of treatment.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200889
Fire ManagementSuppressionFIRE-7
Wildfire will be managed to protect life, firefighter safety, property, and high-risk resource values within the framework of applicable laws, regulations, and agency policies.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200890
Fire ManagementSuppressionFIRE-8
An appropriate management response will be provided to all wildland fires, emphasizing firefighter and public safety and considering suppression costs, benefits, and values to be protected, consistent with resource objectives, standards, and guidelines. Fire Management Unit objectives, as described in the Moab Fire District FMP, will further guide the appropriate management response.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200890
Fire ManagementSuppressionFIRE-9
In multiple fire situations, fires will be suppressed using the following prioritization criteria:
- Protecting human health and safety
- Protecting WUI areas
- Maintaining existing healthy ecosystems
- Potential to impact sensitive resources, such as:
o Critical habitat (T&E)
o Crucial-value wildlife habitat
o Cultural resources
o Sensitive riparian areas
o Priority watersheds.
- Potential for social impacts
- Threats to other agency lands (e.g., NPS, USFS, SITLA)
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200890-91
Fire ManagementWildland Fire UseFIRE-10
Specific areas for wildland fire use will be identified in the Moab Fire District FMP. However, wildland fire use could be authorized for all areas except when the following resources and values may be negatively affected and there are no reasonable measures that could be employed to protect such resources and values:
- WUI areas
- Areas that are known to be highly susceptible to post-fire invasion by cheatgrass or noxious weeds
- Important terrestrial and aquatic habitats
- Non-fire adapted vegetation communities
- Sensitive cultural resources
- Areas with high soil erosion hazard
- Air quality Class 1 areas and PM10 non-attainment areas
- Administrative sites
- Developed recreation sites
- Communication sites
- Oil, gas, and mining facilities
- Above-ground utility corridors
- High-use travel corridors such as interstates, railroads, and/or highways
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200891
Fire ManagementPreventionFIRE-14
Implementation of fire prevention activities will take priority in the following areas:
- WUI areas
- Major travel corridors
- Recreation sites
- Public lands as a whole
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200892
Fire ManagementPreventionFIRE-18
Implementation of fuels management action will take priority in the following areas:
- WUI areas
- Areas with fuel loading that could potentially result in catastrophic wildfires
- Resource improvement areas.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200892
Forest ManagementGoals:
- Restore and manage forest and woodland ecosystems.
- Provide forest and woodland products (e.g., fuel-wood, timber, posts, pinyon nuts, and Christmas trees) on a sustainable basis.
- Manage the public lands to promote healthy, sustainable forest and woodland ecosystems. Provide forest and woodland products for public and commercial uses in areas that are ecologically suitable and in consideration with other resource values. This will be accomplished through permit sales for firewood, timber, Christmas trees, seed and plant collecting, and pine nut gathering, etc.

Objectives:
- Provide opportunities for seed gathering where and when ecologically feasible.
- Permit commercial uses to improve forest and woodland ecosystem health.
- Develop partnerships among internal programs and outside agencies for forest and woodland management.
- Emphasize public education on forest and woodland health, fire danger, and resource uses.
- Develop a Forest and Woodlands Management Plan (FWMP) for the forest and woodlands in the PFO.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200896
Forest ManagementFOR-6
Identify, maintain, and restore forest and woodland old-growth stands to a pre-fire suppression condition. For this identification, the PFO will adopt the USFS old-growth definitions and identification standards in accordance with the USFS document Characteristics of Old-Growth Forests in the Intermountain Region (April 1993). In instances where the area of application in the previous document does not apply to specific species (for example, Pinus edulis), use the document Recommended Old-Growth Definitions and Descriptions, USDA Forest Service Southwestern Region (Sept. 1992).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200897
Forest ManagementFOR-8
The FWMP will provide direction to manage forest and woodland ecosystems to restore, maintain, and improve forest and woodland health, diversity, and resilience to insects and disease. Forests and woodlands will be managed for the long term, including maintenance of healthy habitat for plant and animal species. Forest and woodland management will provide for the harvest of forest and woodland products (including timber) where feasible and compatible with restoring, maintaining, or improving ecosystem health as directed by the Price RMP.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200897
Land AccessFDN-2
Incorporate current Utah BLM Standards for Rangeland Health, as appropriate, across all resource programs as a minimum. Management prescriptions in the form of constraints to use, terms and conditions, and stipulations may be needed to sustain rangeland health and viability. Management prescriptions will consider the following:
- OHVs—Off-highway/road vehicle use during periods of prolonged dryness could be further restricted; or, if site-specific conditions warrant, closure to OHVs could be implemented to minimize vehicle-induced injury or damage to rangeland and/or woodland resources and to minimize the potential of spark-caused fires.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200895
Land AccessNine Mile Canyon SRMAREC-62
ROS class semi-primitive non-motorized areas will be closed to OHV use. No facilities will be located in these areas.
REC-63
The remainder of the area will be limited to designated routes, including all BLM and county system roads.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008111
Land AccessOHVsOHV-1
In preparing RMP designations and implementation-level travel management plans, the BLM will follow policy and regulation authority found at: 43 C.F.R. Part 8340; 43 C.F.R. Subpart 8364; and 43 C.F.R. Subpart 9268.
OHV-2
Where the authorized officer determines that OHVs are causing or will cause considerable adverse impacts, the authorized officer shall close or restrict such areas and the public will be notified.
OHV-5
OHV recreation will be managed according to the following open, closed, and limited to designated route categories (Map R-17):
- 0 acres open
- 557,000 acres closed
- 1,922,000 acres limited to designated routes
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008113
Land AccessOHV-3
BLM could impose limitations on types of vehicles allowed on specific designated routes if monitoring indicates that a particular type of vehicle is causing disturbance to the soil, wildlife habitat, cultural, or vegetative resources, especially by off-road travel in an area that is limited to designated routes.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008114
Land AccessHuntingOHV-4
OHV use for game retrieval will follow all area and routes designations for OHV use.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008114
Land AccessLAR-10
In accordance with the State of Utah v. Andrus, Oct. 1, 1979 (Cotter Decision), the BLM will grant the State of Utah reasonable access to State lands for economic purposes, on a case-by-case basis.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008117
Land AccessWSAWSA-3
Where routes will remain available for motorized use within WSAs (Sids Mountain), continue such use on a conditional basis. Use of the existing authorized routes in the WSA (ways when located within WSAs) could continue as long as the use of these routes does not impair wilderness suitability, as provided by the Interim Management Policy (IMP) (BLM 1995). If the Congress designates the area as wilderness, the routes may be closed, unless otherwise specified by Congress. In the interim, if use and/or non-compliance are found through monitoring efforts to impair the area’s suitability for wilderness designation, the BLM will take further action to limit use of the routes or close them. The continued use of these routes, therefore, is based on user compliance and non-impairment of wilderness values.
WSA-4
OHV area designations in WSA will be as follows (Map R-17):
- 0 acres open
- 512,960 acres closed
- 14,000 acres limited to designated routes.
WSA-5
In the areas where OHV use is limited to designated routes, designate four routes (46 miles of routes) within the Sids Mountain WSA (Map R-18).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008128-129
Land AccessGoals:
- Upgrade and construct roads to provide essential access for resource management purposes.
- Continue to support Carbon and Emery counties and the State of Utah in providing a network of roads across public lands.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008148
Land AccessTRV-3
Allow for reasonable access to non-BLM-managed lands within the PFO.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008148
Land AccessTRV-4
To reduce road density, maintain connectivity, and reduce habitat fragmentation, continue to require reclamation of redundant road systems or roads that no longer serve their intended purpose.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008148
Land UseVisualsManage scenic resources, integral vistas, and landscapes for the benefit of local residents and visitors.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200877
Land UseWSAVRM-1
Manage WSAs as VRM Class I in accordance with BLM IM 2000-096 Use of Visual Resource Management Class I Designation in WSAs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200877
Land UseDesolation Canyon NHLVRM-5
Manage Desolation Canyon NHL as VRM Class I.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200877
Land UseWildlifeGray Canyon Wildland Management Area:
WL-17
The Gray Canyon Wildland Management Area will be managed for wildlife, watershed, and recreation.
- The area will be closed to OHV use except for the Range Creek Jeep Trail, which will be designated for OHV use to the present barricade (T. 17 S., R. 16 E., Section 36, SE1/4SW1/4).
- The Range Creek Allotment will be added to the Gray Canyon Wildland Management Area; however, grazing will not be excluded from the Range Creek Allotment.
- Grazing will be excluded in the rest of the area.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Land UseWilderness characterGoals:
- Protect, preserve, and maintain wilderness character (appearance of naturalness, outstanding opportunities for solitude and primitive unconfined recreation) of non-WSA lands with wilderness characteristics as determined by BLM inventory maintenance, as appropriate.

Objectives:
- Manage primitive backcountry landscapes for undeveloped character and provide opportunities for primitive recreational activities and experience of solitude, as appropriate.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200893
Land UseWilderness characterWC-1
Manage the following 97,100 acres of non-WSA lands with wilderness characteristics areas (Map R-11) for the protection, preservation, and maintenance of their wilderness characteristics:
- Hondu Country (20,000 acres)
- Mexican Mountain (4,200 acres)
- Muddy Creek-Crack Canyon (52,700 acres)
- San Rafael Reef (3,300 acres)
- Wild Horse Mesa (16,900 acres)

WC-2
Protect, preserve, and maintain the wilderness characteristics in these areas through the following prescriptions:
- VRM Class II
- Limit OHV use and all mechanical travel to designated routes
- The Hondu Country and Muddy Creek/Crack Canyon areas will be open to oil and gas leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- The Mexican Mountain, San Rafael Reef, and Wild Horse Mesa will be unavailable to oil and gas leasing
- Closed to activities related to geophysical operations
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Retain public lands in federal ownership
- Avoidance area for ROWs
- Excluded from private or commercial use of woodland products and seed collection.
- Permit maintenance and use of existing facilities, boundary and cherrystem roads.
- Available for range improvements, vegetative and fire treatments and Healthy Lands Initiatives where it meets the goals and objectives for managing these lands.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200893
Land UseFDN-1
Coordinate appropriate management responses with affected parties when natural resources may be affected by fire, drought, insects and diseases, or natural disasters. A variety of emergency or interim actions may be necessary to minimize land health degradations, such as reduced forage allocations; reductions in the number of livestock, wild horses, and/or wildlife; increased mitigation measures to ensure reclamation; and limitations on energy field activities and recreational uses.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200894
Land UseFDN-2
Incorporate current Utah BLM Standards for Rangeland Health, as appropriate, across all resource programs as a minimum. Management prescriptions in the form of constraints to use, terms and conditions, and stipulations may be needed to sustain rangeland health and viability. Management prescriptions will consider the following:
- Surface disturbing activities—These will be closely monitored to ensure compliance with conditions of approval or terms and conditions of authorizations and permits. Action minimizing new surface disturbance, allowed by regulations, and actions ensuring successful reclamation, will be of paramount concern. During periods of drought, the BLM could require additional actions such as changes to standard seed mix compositions, amounts of seed, and method of application. Methods to ensure successful revegetation following disturbance could include hydro mulching, installation of drip irrigators, and fencing to exclude ungulate grazing/browsing.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200894
Land UseGoals:
- Designate those parcels that are eligible for disposal or preferred for acquisition. Consider land tenure adjustments when in the public interest and to accomplish resource management goals or to meet community, State, county, or ecological needs.
- Make public lands available through ROWs or leases for such purposes as transportation routes, utilities, transmission lines, and communication sites, in coordination with other resource goals.
- Designate utility corridors and appropriate uses within those corridors.
- Allow for development of alternative energy sources while meeting other resource objectives. Consider lands for the development of wind and solar energy resources.

Objectives:
- Develop and maintain a land-ownership pattern that will provide better access for managing and protecting public lands.
- Maximize appropriate disposal actions to help solve problems related to intermixed landownership patterns.
- Maintain availability of public lands to meet the habitation, cultivation, trade, mineral development, recreation, and manufacturing needs of external customers and the general public.
- Identify lands for withdrawal to meet federal land-use needs.
- Identify lands for acquisition to meet federal land-use needs.
- Make public lands available to meet the needs for smaller ROWs (e.g., roads or pipelines for oil fields).
- Maintain and acquire public access to meet resource management needs.
- Make public lands available to meet the needs of major ROW customers within designated corridors (e.g., an intrastate pipeline).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008115
Land UseTransfersLAR-1
Transfer only lands out of federal ownership and/or acquire non-federal lands where needed to accomplish important resource management goals or to meet essential community, State, or county needs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008116
Land UseLAR-2
Dispose of lands as specifically identified for lease or disposal under various authorities
(FLPMA 203, 206, R&PP).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008116
Land UseLAR-3
Prioritize acquisition of lands within special designations, including WSAs and ACECs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008116
Land UseLAR-4
Use access or conservation easements to better manage public lands.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008116
Land UseOil and gas leasingLAR-6
Manage R&PP lease areas as open to oil and gas leasing subject to major constraints (NSO).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008116
Land UseAgricultureLAR-7
Do not classify, open, or make available any BLM-administered public lands within the planning area for agricultural leasing or agricultural entry under either Desert Land Entry or Indian Allotment for one or more of the following reasons: rugged topography, presence of sensitive resources, lack of water or access, small parcel size, and/or unsuitable soils.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008116
Land UseExchangesLAR-9
Give land exchanges with the State of Utah priority consideration to resolve inholdings issues for the following reasons:
- A significant number of State land sections administered by SITLA are scattered throughout the PFO. Many of these State lands are inholdings located within designated resource management areas identified in this RMP. SITLA has indicated its desire to exchange SITLA lands within these BLM management areas for BLM-administered lands elsewhere.
- The BLM recognizes the opportunity for mutually beneficial land tenure adjustments and will apply the RMP land tenure adjustment criteria.
- For legislative land tenure adjustments, all appropriate procedures will be followed consistent with the authorizing legislation.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008116-117
Land UseAcquisitionLAR-12
Acquire non-federal lands located within sensitive areas through donation, purchase, or land exchange. Land acquisitions will be negotiated from willing landowners.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008117
Land UseLAR-13
Acquire fee title or interest in non-federal lands (e.g., water rights, scenic easements, and greater sage-grouse leks) with priority placed on lands with critical resource values.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008117
Land UseLAR-11
Consider land ownership changes on lands not specifically identified in the RMP for disposal or acquisition if the changes are in accordance with resource management objectives and other RMP decisions, determined to be in the public interest, and will accomplish one or more of the following criteria:
- The changes are determined to be in the public interest. The public benefits from land resources coming into public ownership, while accommodating the needs of local and State governments, including the needs for public purposes, community growth, and the economy.
- The changes result in a gain of important manageable resources on public lands such as crucial wildlife habitat, significant cultural sites, mineral resources, water sources, listed species by habitat, and areas key to productive ecosystems.
- The changes ensure public access to lands in areas where access is needed and cannot otherwise be obtained.
- The changes promote more effective management and meet essential resource objectives through land ownership consolidation.
- The changes result in acquisition of lands that serve regional or national priorities identified in applicable policy directives or legislation.
- The changes in federal ownership result in “no net loss” of wetlands and/or riparian areas.
If none of the above criteria are met, proposed land ownership changes will not be approved or will require a plan amendment.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008117
Land UseLAR-16
Manage all lands acquired for the purpose for which they were acquired.
LAR-17
If specific management prescriptions were not outlined in the acquisition, manage acquisitions in a manner similar to the least restrictively managed adjacent parcel.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008118
Land UseMineral ResourcesLAR-19
The following areas (328,600 acres) are currently withdrawn from mineral entry (Maps R-20):
- Oil Shale Withdrawal
- Desert Lake Waterfowl Management Area (BLM mineral estate)
- Sunnyside Watershed Withdrawal
- Water Withdrawals
- Three Rivers Withdrawal
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008118
Land UseWSALAR-21
WSAs are utility corridor exclusion areas.
LAR-27
WSAs are ROW exclusion areas.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008119/120
Land UseUtility corridorsLAR-23
All utility corridors within the PFO are designated for any size utility and transportation uses needed. The corridors are 1 mile in width crossing any BLM-administered public lands. These approved corridors will be the preferred location for future major linear ROWs that meet the following criteria:
- Pipelines with a diameter greater than 16 inches
- Transmission (not distribution) lines with a voltage capacity of 69 kV or greater
- Significant conduits requiring a permanent width greater than 50 feet
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008119
Land UseLAR-30
In development of new discretionary ROWs, avoidance areas will include (Map R-22):
- Dry Lake Archaeological District ACEC
- Interstate 70 ACEC
- Muddy Creek ACEC
- San Rafael Canyon ACEC
- Segers Hole ACEC
- The five non-WSA lands with wilderness characteristics managed to protect, preserve, and maintain their wilderness characteristics.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008120
Land UseLAR-31
In development of new discretionary ROWs, exclusion areas will include (Map R-22):
- Range Creek SRMA
- Big Flat Tops ACEC
- Bowknot Bend ACEC
- Rock Art ACEC
- San Rafael Reef ACEC
- Heritage Sites ACEC
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008120
Land UseWoodside CemeteryLAR-40
The Woodside Cemetery will remain closed to any additional burials in accordance with BLM policy for burial on public lands.
LAR-41
The BLM will seek transfer of the Woodside Cemetery through sale, exchange, or R&PP to a qualified entity that will then manage and maintain the cemetery.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008122
Land UseWSAGoals:
- Manage WSAs in accordance with the BLM’s Interim Management Policy for Lands Under Wilderness review (H-8550-1).

Objectives:
- Manage WSAs in a manner that does not to impair the suitability of such areas for preservation as wilderness.
- Grazing, mining, and mineral lease uses that existed before or on October 21, 1976, may continue in the same manner and degree, subject to IMP. Recognize valid existing rights. These uses will be regulated to ensure they will not cause unnecessary or undue degradation of WSA lands as required by section 302(b) of FLPMA.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008128
Land UseWSAWSA-1
Continue to manage all WSAs (Map R-28) according to the Interim Management Policy for Lands Under Wilderness Review (BLM Handbook H-8550-1) until legislation is enacted to either designate the areas as wilderness or release them for uses other than wilderness. The only decisions related to WSA management made in this plan are VRM and OHV designations.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008128
Land UseWSAWSA-2
Within the area managed by the PFO there are two areas, one about 5,370 acres contiguous to the San Rafael Reef WSA and an area totaling 315 acres contiguous to Crack Canyon WSA, that were studied as boundary variations during the wilderness review mandated by the Congress in FLPMA Sections 603(a) and (b). These lands were addressed in the Utah BLM Statewide Wilderness Final EIS (November 1990) and were recommended for congressional wilderness designation in the Utah Statewide Wilderness Study Reports (October 1991), and were therefore BLM Administratively Endorsed as WSAs. This recommendation was forwarded by the President of the United States to the Congress in 1993. Continue to manage the lands in a manner that does not impair their suitability for congressional designation in accordance with FLPMA Section 603(c). Subject to valid existing rights, only consider case-by-case actions where it is determined that wilderness suitability will not be adversely affected.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008128
Land UseWSAWSA-6
Designate all WSAs as VRM Class I.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008129
Land UseWSAWSA-7
Should any WSA, in whole or in part, be released from wilderness consideration, such released lands will be managed in accordance with the goals, objectives, and management prescriptions established in this RMP, unless otherwise specified by Congress in its releasing legislation. The BLM will examine proposals in the released areas on a case-by-case basis but will defer all actions that are inconsistent with RMP goals, objectives, and prescriptions until it completes a land use plan amendment.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008129
Land UseACECGoals:
- Identify and manage areas as ACECs where special management attention is required to protect and prevent irreparable damage to important historic, cultural, or scenic values; and fish and wildlife and botanical resources.

Objectives:
- Manage ACECs to protect the relevant and important values for which each area was established.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008130
Land UseACECBig Flat Tops ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Relict Vegetation:
ACEC-1
Rationale: Contains an isolated relict plant community that remains unaltered by human intervention or domestic livestock grazing. The area will be maintained as an ACEC (190 acres) according to the following special management prescriptions:
- Unavailable to oil and gas leasing
- Closed to the disposal of mineral materials
- Recommended for withdrawal from locatable mineral entry
- Excluded from ROW grants
- Excluded from private or commercial use of woodland products except for limited onsite collection of downed dead wood for campfires
- Closed to livestock use
- Excluded from land treatment and range improvements except for test plots and facilities necessary for study of relict and near-relict plant communities
- VRM Class I
- Closed to OHV use
- Subject to fire suppression activities with special conditions.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008130
Land UseACECBowknot Bend—Relevant and Important Values: Relict Vegetation:
ACEC-2
Rationale: Contains an isolated relict plant community that remains unaltered by human intervention (e.g., domestic livestock grazing). The area will be managed as an ACEC (1,100 acres) with the following special management prescriptions (The portion of the Bowknot Bend ACEC that is overlain by the Horseshoe Canyon (North) WSA will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below.):
- Unavailable oil and gas leasing
- Closed to the disposal of mineral materials
- Recommended for withdrawal from locatable mineral entry
- Excluded from ROW grants
- Excluded from private or commercial use of woodland products except for limited onsite collection of downed dead wood for campfires
- Closed to livestock use
- Excluded from land treatment and range improvements except for test plots and facilities necessary for study of relict and near-relict plant communities
- Closed to OHV use
- VRM Class I
- Subject to fire suppression activities with special conditions.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008131
Land UseACECDry Lake Archaeological District ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Cultural:
ACEC-3
Rationale: Dry Lake Archaeological District has a multitude of apparently undisturbed single-episode lithic scatters, as well as other site types such as lithic procurement, shelters, and campsites. It is one of the most likely locations for finding Paleo-Indian sites, the rarest site type in Utah. The area will be managed as an ACEC (18,000 acres) with the following special management prescriptions:
- Block cultural surveys will be required before all surface disturbing activities within the ACEC
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Open to mineral entry with notice or plan of operations
- Avoided for ROW grants
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will be included:
- Open to disposal of mineral materials
- Open to land treatments and range improvements
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
-Subject to fire suppression as identified in the FMP
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008131-132
Land UseACECInterstate 70 ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Scenic:
ACEC-4
Rationale: Scenic quality “A” in the BLM’s VRM inventory system passing through the San Rafael Swell and bounded on the east by the San Rafael Reef. The ACEC (33,100 acres) will be managed with the following special management prescriptions (The portion of the Interstate 70 ACEC that is overlain by the San Rafael Reef, Devils Canyon, and Sids Mountain WSAs will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below.):
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Closed to the disposal of mineral materials
- Open to mineral entry with notice or plan of operations
- Avoided for ROW grants
- Excluded from land treatment
- Excluded from private and commercial use of woodland products except for limited onsite collection of downed dead wood for campfires
- VRM Class I
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Open to range improvements
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Subject to fire suppression activities as identified in the FMP
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008132
Land UseACECMuddy Creek ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Cultural, Historic, and Scenic:
ACEC-5
Rationale: Landscape is panoramic with few visual boundaries, such as Hondu Arch and Tomsich Butte. Manage the area as an ACEC (25,000 acres) with the following special management prescriptions (The portion of the Muddy Creek ACEC that is overlain by the Muddy Creek WSA will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below.):
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Open to mineral entry with notice or plan of operations
- Avoided for ROW grants
- Excluded from land treatments
- Excluded from private and commercial use of woodland products
- VRM Class I
- Firewood collection not allowed in the ACEC
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Open to range improvements
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Subject to fire suppression as identified in the FMP
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008133
Land UseACECRock Art ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Cultural:
ACEC-6
Rationale: These sites are some of the best examples of prehistoric rock art in the Colorado Plateau. Change the name from “Pictographs ACEC” to “Rock Art ACEC.” The existing ACEC will be maintained (Black Dragon, Head of Sinbad, Rochester/Muddy Petroglyphs, and Lone Warrior); however, the following sites will be managed as part of the Rock Art ACEC (5,300 acres): Sand Cove Spring, King’s Crown, Short Creek, Dry Wash, North Salt Wash, Molen Seep, Big Hole, Cottonwood Canyon, Wild Horse Canyon, and Grassy Trail. (The portion of the Rock Art ACEC that is overlain by the Mexican Mountain and San Rafael Reef WSAs will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below.):
- Archaeological inventories and test excavations will be required before site improvements or a designated route decision.
Manage with the following special management prescriptions:
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Recommended for withdrawal from locatable mineral entry
- Excluded for ROW grants
- Excluded from range improvements and land treatments except for watershed control structures where these will protect cultural resource values
- Immediate areas around panels closed to livestock use
- Excluded from private and commercial use of woodland products except for limited onsite collection of downed dead wood for campfires
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Subject to fire suppression activities as identified in the FMP
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008133-134
Land UseACECSan Rafael Canyon ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Scenic:
ACEC-7
Rationale: The San Rafael River has cut a channel creating what is known as the “Little Grand Canyon” as viewed from the Wedge. The Black Boxes are world renowned. Manage the area as an ACEC (15,200 acres), combining the upper, middle and lower portions of the existing ACEC, the excluding those portions within the WSAs (which will eliminate most of the upper and lower portions). Manage with the following special management prescriptions:
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Open to mineral entry with notice or plan of operations
- Avoided for ROW grants
- Excluded from private and commercial use of woodland products except for limited onsite collection of downed dead wood for campfires
- Closed to livestock grazing within Buckhorn Draw
- Excluded from land treatments and range improvements unless used to protect or improve riparian values
- VRM Class II.
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Subject to fire suppression activities as identified in the FMP.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008134-135
Land UseACECSan Rafael Reef ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Scenic and Vegetation:
ACEC-8
Rationale: Unique for its vegetation and scenic values. Relict vegetation communities are found throughout the steeply dipping cuestas on the back side of the reef. There are few views within the reef that do not involve a panoramic scene into a deeply cut canyon or an enclosed view dominated by a vertical red sandstone wall or tremendous fin. Manage the area as an ACEC, combing the North and South portions of the existing ACEC (72,000 acres), with the following special management prescriptions (The portion of the San Rafael Reef ACEC that is overlain by the San Rafael Reef WSA will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below.):
- Unavailable to leasing for oil and gas
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Recommended for withdrawal from locatable mineral entry
- Excluded from ROW grants
-Excluded from private or commercial use of woodland products except for limited onsite collection of downed dead wood for campfires
- Excluded from land treatments and range improvements except for water control structures where these will protect scenic values
- VRM Class I
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Subject to fire suppression as identified in the FMP
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008135
Land UseACECSegers Hole ACEC—Relevant and Important Values: Scenic:
ACEC-9
Rationale: Scenic quality “A” in the BLM’s VRM inventory and bordered by the Chimney on the north and east and by the Moroni Slopes on the south and west. Manage the area as an ACEC (7,120 acres) with the following special management prescriptions (The portion of the Segers Hole ACEC that is overlain by the Muddy Creek WSA will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below.):
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Open to mineral entry with notice or plan of operations
- Avoided for ROW grants
- Open to range improvements with special conditions
- Excluded from land treatments
- Excluded from private and commercial use of woodland products except for limited onsite collection of downed dead wood for campfires
- VRM Class I
- Subject to fire suppression activities with special conditions
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008136
Land UseACECNine Mile Canyon Relevant and Important Values: Cultural:
ACEC-10
Rationale: This area holds significant prehistoric archaeological resources. Nine Mile Canyon is known to contain the countrys highest concentration of rock art panels, remnants of the prehistoric Archaic, Fremont, and Ute cultures. About 80 percent of the known sites are rock art. This ACEC is within the BLM Vernal and Price Field Offices.
Manage the area as an ACEC (26,200 acres). Special management prescriptions will include:
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Split estate will be open to oil and gas leasing subject to minor constraints (CSU)
- VRM Class II and III in selected areas as indicated on Map R-5
- Utility corridor will be allowed as shown on Map R-21
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Limit OHV use to designated routes
- Open to disposal of mineral materials
- Oil and gas development in the Nine Mile Canyon ACEC will be permitted after compliance with the NHPA
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008136-137
Land UseACECCleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry—Relevant and Important Values: Paleontological:
ACEC-11
Rationale: The Cleveland-Lloyd deposit is unique in itself. The Cleveland-Lloyd bone deposit is the densest concentration of Jurassic dinosaur bones in the world. This area also contains the world’s largest collection of fossils of a large meat-eating dinosaur (Allosaurus fragilis) yet found. Manage the area as an ACEC (770 acres). The ACEC will be managed with the following special management prescriptions:
- Will be managed for protection and scientific use and public interpretation and education of the paleontologic resources
- Collection of fossils will be allowed to those with a valid BLM-issued paleontological use permit
- Closed to all public access without authorization. Note: Paid use fee will be considered authorization
- Mountain bikes and OHV use to be allowed on designated routes
- Camping will not be allowed
- The construction of facilities to be allowed for research, visitor safety, convenience, resource interpretation, and comfort
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Recommended for withdrawal from mineral entry
- Collection of non-renewable resources such as fossils, rocks, mineral specimens, common invertebrate fossils, semiprecious gemstones, petrified wood, and mineral materials will not be allowed, per applicable law, policy, and regulation.
- Hiking to be allowed only on developed interpretive trails; hiking off trails to be allowed for guided tours offered by BLM staff
- Unavailable to oil and gas leasing within the NNL boundary. Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO) outside the NNL boundary and within the ACEC
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008137
Land UseACECHeritage Sites—Relevant and Important Values: Historic:
ACEC-12
Rationale: Includes several sites associated with the early historic uses on the public lands in Emery County including Wilsonville, Shepherds End, Smith Cabin, Hunt Cabin, Copper Globe, Temple Mountain, and Swaseys Cabin. Manage these areas as an ACEC (1,485 acres) with the following special management prescriptions:
- Firewood collection not allowed in the ACEC
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Recommended for withdrawal from locatable mineral entry except Temple Mountain will be open to mineral entry with notice or plan of operation
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
- Excluded from ROW grants
- Excluded from land treatments and range improvements except for watershed control structures where these will protect historic values
- VRM Class II
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008138
Land UseACECUranium Mining Districts—Relevant and Important Values: Historic:
ACEC-13
Rationale: These sites include Tidwell Draw, Hidden Splendor, Little Susan, and Lucky Strike Mining Districts. The potential ACEC includes several significant mining sites associated with the development of uranium as part of U.S. efforts during the escalation of the cold war during the 1950s. Manage these areas as an ACEC (3,470 acres) with the following special management prescriptions (The portion of the Uranium Mining Districts ACEC that is overlain by the Crack Canyon WSA will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below.):
- Closed to firewood collection in the ACEC
- Closed to livestock use
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO)
- Open to mineral entry with notice or plan of operations
- No disturbance of historic structures until the historic features have been recorded and oral history has been conducted
In addition, the following general management prescriptions will include:
- Open to disposal of mineral materials
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008138-139
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeWL-14
Big game winter range will be managed to maximize browse production, using kind of livestock and season of use.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingWildlifePronghorn Habitat:
WL-15
Current livestock grazing prescriptions will continue, and where opportunities exist, will be adjusted to enhance forb production on pronghorn ranges.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingWildlifeBighorn Sheep Habitats:
WL-16
Changes in kind of livestock from cattle to domestic sheep will be prohibited within 9 miles of currently occupied bighorn sheep (Desert and Rocky Mountain) habitat to provide an adequate buffer zone.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200883
Livestock and GrazingWild horses and burrosGoals:
- Manage wild horses and burros at appropriate management levels (AML) to ensure a thriving natural ecological balance among wild horse populations, wildlife, livestock, vegetation resources, and other resource values.
- Manage wild horses and burros to achieve and maintain viable, vigorous, and stable populations.
- To the degree possible, maintain, enhance, and perpetuate respective viable herds’ distinguishing characteristics (by HMA) that were typical at the time of the passage of the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act or that are identified in a management plan.
- Allow introductions of wild horses and burros from other herd areas to maintain genetic viability as long as the horses being introduced have characteristics similar to the horses in the HMA to which they are being introduced.

Objectives:
- Maintain the number of wild horses and burros within established HMAs at AMLs as designated in Herd Management Area Plans.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200886
Livestock and GrazingWild horses and burrosWHB-6
The AML in the Robbers Roost HMA will be set at zero. The area will lose its status as an HMA but will maintain herd area status for future management consideration should conditions change.
WHB-7
The AML will be periodically evaluated and subject to adjustment in HMA plans and Environmental Assessments for gathers based on monitoring data and best science methods.
WHB-8
Range Creek HMA; 55,000 acres; 75–125 (horses)
WHB-9
Muddy Creek HMA; 283,000 acres; 75–125 (horses)
WHB-10
Sinbad HMA; 99,210 acres; 0 (horses); 50–70 (burros)
WHB-11
Robbers Roost HMA; 0 acres; 0 (horses)
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200887
Livestock and GrazingWild horses and burrosWHB-12
3,000 animal unit months (AUMs) will be allocated for wild horses, and 420 AUMs will be allocated for wild burros.
WHB-13
Increase or decrease in available forage will be adjusted on a case-by-case basis to support Standards for Rangeland Health.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200888
Livestock and GrazingWild horses and burrosWHB-12
3,000 animal unit months (AUMs) will be allocated for wild horses, and 420 AUMs will be allocated for wild burros.
WHB-13
Increase or decrease in available forage will be adjusted on a case-by-case basis to support Standards for Rangeland Health.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200888
Livestock and GrazingFDN-2
Incorporate current Utah BLM Standards for Rangeland Health, as appropriate, across all resource programs as a minimum. Management prescriptions in the form of constraints to use, terms and conditions, and stipulations may be needed to sustain rangeland health and viability. Management prescriptions will consider the following:
- Livestock grazing—Use will be allowed in both quantity and timing that will not result in a downward shift in rangeland health and/or production. The BLM will work cooperatively to effect a grazing strategy specific to a grazing permittees individual grazing allotment(s) and make changes to the grazing authorizations, as appropriate, within the limits of the existing permit and in accordance with the grazing regulations. In the case of drought, the last recourse for the BLM will be to temporarily close the range, or portions of it, to livestock grazing.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200894
Livestock and GrazingFDN-2
Incorporate current Utah BLM Standards for Rangeland Health, as appropriate, across all resource programs as a minimum. Management prescriptions in the form of constraints to use, terms and conditions, and stipulations may be needed to sustain rangeland health and viability. Management prescriptions will consider the following:
- Livestock grazing—Use will be allowed in both quantity and timing that will not result in a downward shift in rangeland health and/or production. The BLM will work cooperatively to effect a grazing strategy specific to a grazing permittees individual grazing allotment(s) and make changes to the grazing authorizations, as appropriate, within the limits of the existing permit and in accordance with the grazing regulations. In the case of drought, the last recourse for the BLM will be to temporarily close the range, or portions of it, to livestock grazing.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200894
Livestock and GrazingGoals:
- Manage the public lands to promote healthy sustainable rangeland ecosystems that provide livestock forage production and allow the development of necessary livestock management facilities for the orderly use of the livestock industry.

Objectives:
- Maintain, restore, and improve public rangelands to meet the Standards for Rangeland Health.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingRangeland Health StandardsGRA-1
Manage grazing and rangeland health according to the Standards for Rangeland Health and Guidelines for Grazing Management for BLM Lands in Utah, and in 43 CFR 4100 et seq. based on historical use and dependent on the availability of forage and water.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingRangeland Health StandardsGRA-2
Based on Taylor Grazing Act guidance that directs that public “land and its resources must be preserved from destruction or unnecessary injury,” temporarily adjust forage allocations as needed during periods of forage depletion caused by severe drought or other natural causes such as fire. Additional guidance is found in the Standards for Rangeland Health and Guidelines for Grazing Management for BLM Lands in Utah. During times when extreme climatic conditions exist, the BLM will manage and adjust grazing practices to maintain and work toward meeting Standards for Rangeland Health for Public Lands in the PFO, see Appendix R-7.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingRangeland Health StandardsGRA-3
Base changes in levels of use or continuance of permitted use on current laws, policy, and monitoring data, and analysis in accordance with NEPA. The analysis process will consider LUP program decision objectives and priorities in relation to livestock grazing and achievement of Standards for Rangeland Health on a case-by-case basis.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingGRA-4
Provide for the development and maintenance of range improvement projects and livestock facilities on a case-by-case basis. Construct range improvement projects to BLM specifications. Document access routes for the range improvements in the individual project files.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingGoals:
- Manage the public lands to promote healthy sustainable rangeland ecosystems that provide livestock forage production and allow the development of necessary livestock management facilities for the orderly use of the livestock industry.

Objectives:
- Maintain, restore, and improve public rangelands to meet the Standards for Rangeland Health.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingRangeland Health StandardsGRA-1
Manage grazing and rangeland health according to the Standards for Rangeland Health and Guidelines for Grazing Management for BLM Lands in Utah, and in 43 CFR 4100 et seq. based on historical use and dependent on the availability of forage and water.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingRangeland Health StandardsGRA-2
Based on Taylor Grazing Act guidance that directs that public “land and its resources must be preserved from destruction or unnecessary injury,” temporarily adjust forage allocations as needed during periods of forage depletion caused by severe drought or other natural causes such as fire. Additional guidance is found in the Standards for Rangeland Health and Guidelines for Grazing Management for BLM Lands in Utah. During times when extreme climatic conditions exist, the BLM will manage and adjust grazing practices to maintain and work toward meeting Standards for Rangeland Health for Public Lands in the PFO, see Appendix R-7.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingRangeland Health StandardsGRA-3
Base changes in levels of use or continuance of permitted use on current laws, policy, and monitoring data, and analysis in accordance with NEPA. The analysis process will consider LUP program decision objectives and priorities in relation to livestock grazing and achievement of Standards for Rangeland Health on a case-by-case basis.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Livestock and GrazingGRA-4
Provide for the development and maintenance of range improvement projects and livestock facilities on a case-by-case basis. Construct range improvement projects to BLM specifications. Document access routes for the range improvements in the individual project files.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200899
Mineral ResourcesMLE-11
Incorporated municipalities are not available for Federal mineral leasing as established in 43 CFR 3100-3(a)(2)(iii) and 3100-3(b)(2)(ii).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008126
Mineral ResourcesGeophysical operationsMLE-12
Geophysical operations will be allowed consistent with existing regulations for geophysical exploration, except in the five non-WSA lands with wilderness characteristics managed in this alternative, which will be closed to activities related to geophysical operations.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008126
Mineral ResourcesMLO-1
Locatable minerals are those minerals that can be obtained by locating and perfecting mining claims under the General Mining Law of 1872.
MLO-2
In addition to the 328,600 acres currently withdrawn, 92,700 acres will be recommended for withdrawal from locatable mineral entry (Map R-20). See Lands and Realty - Withdrawal Areas.
MLO-3
Locatable minerals will be managed according to the 43 CFR 3809 Surface Management regulations and the 43 CFR 3715 Use and Occupancy regulations.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008127
Mineral ResourcesMSA-1
Areas that will be closed for mineral materials disposal are indicated on Map R-27 (820,000 acres).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008127
Noxious WeedsImplement the BLM Partners Against Weeds Action Plan, including prevention, early detection, inventory, integrated weed management, and monitoring and evaluation of noxious weeds.

Manage the public lands to promote healthy, sustainable native plant communities, protect areas with relict vegetation, and mitigate activities to prevent introduction of noxious weeds.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200869
Noxious WeedsVEG-8
Work cooperatively with local and other Federal Government agencies to develop and implement agreements and plans that promote the prevention of infestation and spread of listed noxious weeds and their eradication on public lands throughout the PFO.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200871
Noxious WeedsVEG-9
Continue implementation of noxious weed and invasive species control actions in accordance with national guidance and local weed management plans, in cooperation with State, federal, affected counties, adjoining private land owners, and other partners or interests directly affected.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200871
Predator ControlPredator ControlWL-1
Coordinate predator control with U.S. Department of Agriculture—Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife Services and UDWR as described in the existing memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the BLM and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife Services; predator control activities will continue to be conducted by Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife Services.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200881
Recreation and TourismFDN-2
Incorporate current Utah BLM Standards for Rangeland Health, as appropriate, across all resource programs as a minimum. Management prescriptions in the form of constraints to use, terms and conditions, and stipulations may be needed to sustain rangeland health and viability. Management prescriptions will consider the following:
- Recreation—During periods of prolonged dryness or drought, the BLM, in cooperation with local and State fire management agencies, will limit campfires to established fire rings or fully contained fires. The last resort will be to close the public lands to campfires of any kind.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200894
Recreation and TourismGoals:
- Establish management that provides necessary public services, authentic recreation experience, and opportunity within allowable use levels; minimizes user conflicts; and
maintains the healthy ecosystems and settings that provide the basis for recreation opportunity and experience.
- Provide an environment for and encourage entrepreneurial activities that are supportive of the recreation program goals and objectives.

Objectives:
- Manage all SRMAs to provide the benefits, experiences, and opportunities identified for each.
- Use the ROS classification system in SRMAs as a guide to decision making on projects with the potential to alter the physical, managerial, or social settings that create the opportunities and experiences.
- Develop a Recreation Area Management Plan (RAMP) for all designated SRMAs.
- Review and update the Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry RAMP.
- Review and update the Desolation and Gray Canyons of the Green River, River Management Plan.
- Use recreation permitting to direct and manage recreation use.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008103
Recreation and TourismRangeland Health StandardsREC -1
Manage recreation generally guided by the Standards for Rangeland Health and Guidelines for Recreation Management for BLM Lands in Utah. The guidelines describe, in a broad sense, the procedures that should be applied to achieve standards for rangeland health within the recreation program.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008103
Recreation and TourismREC-2
Portions of the PFO not identified as a SRMA will be identified as an Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA). ERMAs will receive only custodial management (which addresses only activity opportunities) of visitor health and safety, user conflict, and resource protection issues with no activity-level planning. Therefore, actions within ERMAs will generally be implemented directly from LUP decisions, such as Special Recreation Permits (SRP) or OHV management decisions. See Appendix R-9 for additional specific recreation management objectives for the PFO ERMA.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008103
Recreation and TourismCampingREC-3
Allow dispersed camping throughout the PFO without permit, unless otherwise designated by the BLM. Determine and designate areas for dispersed camping and associated access routes with the cooperation of the counties.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008104
Recreation and TourismREC-5
Manage developed recreation sites as recommended for withdrawal from mineral entry or as open to oil and gas leasing subject to major constraints (NSO).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008104
Recreation and TourismGrazingREC-6
Close developed recreational sites to grazing and include fencing the site in the development plan when appropriate.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008104
Recreation and TourismREC-4
Prohibit rock climbing above or within 300 feet horizontally of cultural sites. Rock climbing activities will be authorized only in areas where there are no conflicts with cliff-nesting raptors.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008104
Recreation and TourismMountain BikingREC-8
Allow mountain biking on all routes designated for OHV use and on June’s Bottom and Black Dragon Canyon routes and other routes or areas designated for mountain bike use. Designation of additional mountain bike areas or routes will occur through activity plans.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008104
Recreation and TourismDeveloped Recreation SitesREC-9
Continue to manage and maintain developed recreation sites. Sites administered by the PFO are Daddy Canyon Recreation Site (RS), Price Canyon RS, Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, Cedar Mountain RS, Buckhorn Pictograph Panel, San Rafael Bridge RS, Swaseys Cabin RS, Little Wild Horse Canyon RS, Wedge Overlook RS, and Temple Mountain RS. Sites located in other field office areas and maintained by the PFO are Lower Gray Canyon RS, Mineral Bottom RS, and Sand Wash RS.

REC-10
Develop new sites in response to user demand, amenity value, and critical resource protection needs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008104
Recreation and TourismSRMAREC-13
Designate all SRMAs as special areas (Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act [2004]), and if needed, require permits and payment of fees for recreational use (Map R-14). Activity plans will be created or updated for all SRMAs.

REC-14
Conduct all recreation management activities and developments in the SRMA in support of the individual SRMA goals and objectives.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008105
Recreation and TourismOil and gas leasingREC-22
Desolation Canyon SRMA
Any additional routes constructed on existing leases for oil and gas will be gated and open for administrative use only unless determined to enhance the SRMA objectives.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008106
Recreation and TourismCultural, Historical, Geological, and Paleontological ResourcesRange Creek SRMA:
REC-26
To effectively manage the State and federal lands for protection of cultural values in this area, a cooperative management plan is necessary. The BLM will work with the State of Utah to develop common management prescriptions for protection.

REC-27
The activity plan for the Range Creek SRMA will be developed in coordination with the State of Utah to ensure consistent management, which may include additional restrictions for the protection of natural resources including cultural.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008106-107
Recreation and TourismLand UseRange Creek SRMA:
REC-28
The SRMA will include the following management, as well as prescriptions identified in the activity level plan:
- Oil and gas will be open to leasing subject to major constraints (NSO) outside the WSAs
- Excluded for ROW grants
- Closed to OHV use
- Closed to disposal of mineral materials
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008107
Recreation and TourismLand UseRange Creek SRMA:
REC-29
Until the activity level plan is finalized, the BLM will implement the State of Utah’s interim management where it was more restrictive than management on public lands, which is as follows:
- Closed to mechanical use
- Camping and campfires will not be allowed
- Public access limited to hiking and horseback riding
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008107
Recreation and TourismLand UseCleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry SRMA:
REC-30
Close the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry SRMA to collection of natural products, including paleontological resources, except by permit.

REC-34
Prohibit disposal of mineral materials (salable) in Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry SRMA.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008107
Recreation and TourismNine Mile Canyon SRMAREC-57
The Nine Mile Canyon SRMA will be managed in coordination with the Vernal Field Office according to the 1995 Recreation and Cultural Area Management Plan except as modified by the management alternatives listed below. Such changes include VRM objectives.
REC-59
The purpose of the Nine Mile Canyon SRMA will be to manage recreation and interpretive activities related to the cultural and historic resources and landscapes in the area.
REC-61
Development will be required to meet VRM II and III objectives (Map R-5).
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008111
Recreation and TourismNine Mile Canyon SRMAREC-64
ROS roaded natural (RN) class areas will contain visitor facilities, directional signage, interpretive materials, and infrastructure to support visitor health and safety, visitor appreciation of cultural resources, and resource protection.
REC-65
Private enterprise on private lands in support of public visitation within RN class areas will be encouraged by the BLM.
REC-66
The Nine Mile Canyon area will be closed to camping on public lands except for designated areas.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008111
Recreation and TourismWSAREC-74
Competitive events will not be permitted in WSAs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008113
Recreation and TourismTRA-10
Issue no SRPs for vending on scenic byways and backways. Commercial activities will be directed to communities along the routes.
TRA-11
Work with local communities and other groups to foster heritage tourism throughout the PFO.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008145
Recreation and TourismHuntington/Eccles Canyons Energy Loop National Scenic Byway:
TRA-18
Manage the small portion of this byway in the PFO in accordance with the USFS Byway Management Plan.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008146
Recreation and TourismWedge Overlook/Buckhorn Draw State Scenic Backway:
TRA-19
Protect natural values and scenery in the corridor.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008146
Recreation and TourismDinosaur Quarry/Cedar Overlook State Scenic Backway:
TRA-20
Adhere to appropriate recreation management implemented by the Scenic Byway Committee to the extent possible according to the goals and objectives outlined in the Proposed RMP.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008146
Recreation and TourismTemple Mountain/Goblin Valley Road State Scenic Backway:
TRA-21
Adhere to appropriate recreation management implemented by the Scenic Byway Committee to the extent possible according to the goals and objectives outlined in the Proposed RMP.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008146
Riparian AreasMaintain and/or enhance riparian areas (Utah Riparian Management Policy 2005) through project design features and/or stipulations that protect riparian resources.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesGoals:
- Maintain, protect, and enhance habitats (including but not limited to designated critical habitat) and actively promote recovery, maintenance, protection, and enhancement of populations and habitats of BLM, non-listed, special status plant and animal species to ensure that actions authorized, funded, or carried out do not contribute to the need for these species to be listed as T&E under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
- Assist in managing, conserving, and recovering listed threatened and endangered plant and animal species found within the Price planning area, where appropriate.

Objectives:
- Recognize and support the role of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in managing federally listed T&E plant and animal species.
- In consultation with USFWS and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR), apply species-specific protective stipulations on federal actions to avoid or minimize adverse
effects on federally listed, proposed, or candidate species or suitable habitat for the same species as referenced in Appendix R-4 which includes conservation measures from Section 5 of the Biological Assessment.
- Maintain adequate baseline information regarding the extent of special status species to make informed decisions, evaluate the effectiveness of management actions, and assess progress toward recovery. Implement species-specific conservation measures to avoid or mitigate adverse impacts on known populations and their habitats of BLM special status plant and animal species on BLM-administered lands.
- Advance the conservation of greater sage-grouse and greater sage-grouse habitat in accordance with BLM’s National Sage-Grouse Habitat Conservation Strategy to avoid contributing to the need to list the greater sage-grouse as a T&E species under the ESA.
- Cooperate with the USFWS, other agencies, and universities to develop plans for federally listed T&E plant and animal species.
- Work with the UDWR to identify and improve special status fish passage and habitat connectivity. Maintain or improve habitat for reintroduction of special status species fish to streams.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200879
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesSSS-1
As directed by BLM Manual 6840, manage habitat for sensitive species in a manner that will ensure that all actions authorized, funded, or carried out by the BLM do not contribute to the need for the species to become listed.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200879
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesSSS-2
Follow guidelines and implement management recommendations presented in species recovery or conservation plans or alternative management strategies developed in consultation with USFWS.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200880
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesSSS-4
Prohibit surface disturbances that may affect listed species or critical habitat of listed or candidate plants or animals without consultation or conference (ESA, Section 7) between the BLM and USFWS.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200880
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesSSS-6
Where possible, implement the conservation actions identified in the Utah Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy (Gorrell et al. 2005), which identifies priority wildlife species and habitats, identifies and assesses threats to their survival, and identifies long-term conservation actions needed, including those on BLM-administered lands.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200880
Water Quality and HydrologyGoals:
Manage uses to minimize and mitigate damage to soils, including critical soils and biological soil crusts.
Prevent excessive soil erosion.
Maintain or restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the area’s soil and waters.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologyImplement management actions to ensure that sufficient quantity, quality, and timing of water is present to support water-dependent resource values, including fisheries, riparian communities, wetland communities, aquatic insects, terrestrial wildlife, and migratory/non-migratory birds.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologyImplement management actions to ensure that sufficient quantity, quality, and timing of water is present to support human and economic uses of water on public lands, including livestock grazing, recreation, forestry, and mineral development.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologyManage resources to improve streams listed as water quality limited and prevent listing of additional streams under the Clean Water Act, Section 303(d).Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologyWatershed protectionManage resources to maintain or restore overall watershed health and reduce erosion, stream sedimentation, and salinization of water according to 43 CFR 4180 through watershed assessments.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologySalinityManage resources to reduce salinity loading where possible in accomplishing the goals and objectives outlined in the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologyMaintain and enhance water-dependent natural resource values.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologyFloodplainsProtect floodplains pursuant to Executive Order (EO) 11988 and avoiding disturbance in floodplains.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
Water Quality and HydrologySpring developmentWAT-4
No surface disturbance or occupancy will be maintained around natural springs to protect the water quality of the spring. The distance will be based on geophysical, riparian, and other factors necessary to protect the water quality of the springs. If these factors cannot be determined, a 660-foot buffer zone will be maintained.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200867
Water Quality and HydrologySpring developmentWAT-5
The BLM will allow development of spring sources but will require protection of the spring source to maintain water quality and avoid detrimental impacts.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200867
Water Quality and HydrologyWAT-8
Buffer zones of no new surface disturbance (excluding fence lines) will be required in areas equal to the 100-year floodplain or 100 meters (330 feet) on either side from the centerline, whichever is greater, along all perennial and intermittent streams, streams with perennial reaches, and riparian areas. The BLM Authorized Officer could authorize an exception if it could be shown that the project as mitigated eliminated the need for the restriction.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200868
WetlandsManage, maintain, protect, and restore riparian and wetland areas to the proper functioning condition (PFC) and achieve an advanced riparian obligate vegetation community as described in BLM TR 1737-9.Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200866
WetlandsWAT-1
Manage wetlands, and riparian areas as prescribed in Executive Order (EO) 11990.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200867
WetlandsWAT-6
The water table in wetlands and riparian areas will be maintained or restored, when feasible.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200867
WetlandsWater RightsWAT-7
The BLM will collaborate with partners to establish minimum water requirements in wetlands and riparian areas. If additional water is required for restoration efforts, appropriate water rights will need to be obtained in accordance with Utah law.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200867
WetlandsWildlifeWL-9
Maintain, protect, and restore riparian and wetland areas to PFC state (within capability) to achieve a multilayered, diverse, riparian area dominated by either facultative wetland or obligate riparian vegetative communities to support optimum diversity and density of wildlife species.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200882
Wild and Scenic RiversVisualsVRM-2
Manage Wild segments of any Wild and Scenic Rivers recommended as suitable as VRM Class I.
VRM-3
Manage Scenic segments of any Wild and Scenic Rivers recommended as suitable as VRM Class II.
VRM-4
Manage Recreational segments of any Wild and Scenic Rivers recommended as suitable in the same VRM class as surrounding lands.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 200877
Wild and Scenic RiversGoals:
- To the extent of the BLM’s authority (limited to BLM lands within the corridor), maintain the free-flowing character, preserve or enhance the outstandingly remarkable values, and allow no activities within the river corridor that will alter the tentative classification of those segments determined suitable for congressional designation for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic River System.

Objectives:
- Review all eligible rivers to determine suitability for Congressional designation into the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.
- Apply appropriate management decisions that will protect the tentative classifications of wild, scenic, or recreational suitable river segments.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008140
Wild and Scenic RiversWSR-1
Any eligible segment not determined to be suitable will receive no special protection specifically for its free-flowing values, outstandingly remarkable values, and tentative classifications.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008140
Wild and Scenic RiversWater RightsWSR-2
The BLM will not seek additional water rights for management of the Green River as a wild and scenic river. Therefore, recommendation of river segments as suitable will not affect adjudicated water rights for any of the identified segments. Management for the noted river segment corridors will not assert a federal reserved water right.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008140
Wild and Scenic RiversWSR-3
BLM will work with the State of Utah, local and tribal governments, and other federal agencies, in a state-wide study, to reach consensus regarding recommendations to Congress for the inclusion of rivers in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Besides applying consistent criteria across agency jurisdictions, the joint study will avoid piece-mealing of river segments in logical watershed units in the state. The study will evaluate, in detail, the possible benefits and effects of designation on the local and state economies, agricultural and industrial operations and interests, outdoor recreation, natural resources (including the outstandingly remarkable values for which the river was deemed suitable), water rights, water quality, water resource planning, and access to and across river corridors within, and upstream and downstream from the proposed segments(s). Actual designation of river segments will only occur through congressional action or as a result of Secretarial decision at the request of the Governor in accordance with provisions of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (the Act). BLM will work with the State, local and tribal governments, and the agencies involved to coordinate its decision making on wild and scenic river issues and to achieve consistency wherever possible.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008140
Wild and Scenic RiversWater RightsWSR-4
The BLM recognizes that water resources on most river and stream segments within the State of Utah are already fully allocated. Before stream segments that have been recommended as suitable under this RMP are recommended to Congress for designation, BLM will continue to work with affected local, state, federal, and tribal partners to identify in-stream flows necessary to meet critical resource needs, including values related to the subject segments(s). Such quantifications will be included in any recommendation for designation. The BLM will then seek to jointly promote innovative strategies, community-based planning, and voluntary agreements with water users, under State law, to address those needs.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008141
Wild and Scenic RiversWater RightsWSR-5
Should designations occur on any river segment as a result of Secretarial or congressional action, existing rights, privileges, and contracts will be protected. Under Section 12 of the Act, termination of such rights, privileges, and contracts may happen only with the consent of the affected non-federal party. A determination by the BLM of eligibility and suitability for the inclusion of rivers on public lands to the Wild and Scenic Rivers System does not create new water rights for the BLM. Federal reserved water rights for new components of the Wild and Scenic Rivers System are established at the discretion of Congress. If water is reserved by Congress when a river component is added to the Wild and Scenic Rivers System, it will come from water that is not appropriated at the time of designation, in the amount necessary to protect features which led to the river’s inclusion into the system. BLMs intent will be to leave existing water rights undisturbed and to recognize the lawful rights of private, municipal, and state entities to manage water resources under state law to meet the needs of the community. Federal law, including Section 13 of the Act and the McCarren Amendment (43 USC 666), recognizes state jurisdiction over water allocation in designated streams. Thus, it is BLMs position that existing water rights, including flows apportioned to the State of Utah interstate agreements and compacts, including the Upper Colorado River Compact, and developments of such rights will not be affected by designation or the creation of the possible federal reserved water right. BLM will seek to work with upstream and downstream water users and applicable agencies to ensure that water flows are maintained at a level sufficient to sustain the values for which affected river segments were designated.
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008141
Wild and Scenic RiversWSR-6
Protective management will apply to BLM lands along suitable river segments with 62 miles tentatively classified as Wild, 60 miles as Scenic, and 8 miles as Recreational (Map R-30). Specific management prescriptions for each suitable segment are identified below: Any portion of a suitable segment (Wild, Scenic, or Recreational) that is overlain by a WSA will be managed in accordance with the IMP, where the IMP is more restrictive than the prescriptions below. The prescriptions below reflect the least restrictive level of management that is applied to the entire segment, although more restrictive management may apply to portions of the segment due to overlap from other management prescriptions.
Green River:
County line near Nine Mile Creek to Chandler Canyon (Desolation Canyon) Suitable—Wild
- Oil and gas leasing: NSO
- OHV category: Closed
- VRM designation: Class I
Chandler Creek to Florence Creek (Desolation Canyon) Suitable—Scenic
- Oil and gas leasing: Unavailable
- OHV category: Closed
- VRM designation: Class I
Florence Creek to Nefertiti boat ramp (Desolation and Gray Canyons) Suitable—Wild
- Oil and gas leasing: Unavailable
- OHV category: Closed
- VRM designation: Class I
Nefertiti boat ramp to Swaseys boat ramp Suitable—Recreational
- Oil and gas leasing: Unavailable
- OHV category: Closed
- VRM designation: Class I
Confluence with San Rafael River to Canyonlands National Park Suitable—Scenic
- Oil and gas leasing: NSO
- OHV category: Limited to designated routes
- VRM designation: Class II
Price Field Office Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan, 2008141-142
WildlifeHabitatHabitat Objective 2: Improve the quality and quantity of vegetation for mule deer on a minimum of 500,000 acres of crucial range by 2019.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan19
WildlifePopulation managementMaintain a hunting program for mule deer that encourages a variety of quality hunting opportunities while maintaining population objectives.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan20
WildlifePopulation managementPopulation Management Goal: Expand and improve mule deer populations throughout the state within the carrying capacity of available habitats and in consideration of other land uses.Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan17
WildlifePopulation managementPopulation Objective: By 2019, increase mule deer populations within the state as conditions allow and bring all populations to their unit objective (currently (2014) 425,400).Utah Mule Deer Statewide Management Plan17
WildlifeHabitatFuture physical and environmental footprints of housing and urban development are reduced or managed so that wildlife resources are sustained.Utah Wildlife Action Plan162
WildlifeHabitatGrazing is managed such that ecological conditions in Key Habitats show improvement in various indicators of rangeland health.Utah Wildlife Action Plan168
WildlifeHabitatInappropriate Fire Frequency and Intensity - Fire is excluded from habitats in which potential burns now would be frequent, large, and destructive to soils and native vegetation to the habitats are being actively managed (treated) to reduce components or factors that promote risk of catastrophic fire, such as cheatgrass, excessive conifer encroachment, or unnaturally large stands of mature Gambel oakUtah Wildlife Action Plan188
WildlifeHabitatNew roads are planned and sited in areas where there are limited impacts to wildlife. When existing roads are maintained, barriers to wildlife movement are altered to allow for movement.Utah Wildlife Action Plan173
WildlifeHabitatOpen lands that are crucial to wildlife do not have the potential to be developed for housing and urban growth.Utah Wildlife Action Plan160
WildlifeWildlife management agencies, public land management agencies and the County shall work together to manage big game populations that are compatible with livestock grazing and are within the allocations set by the resource management plan.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeWildlife agencies shall find effective ways to mitigate and compensate landowners for damage caused by big game animals on private property. Wasatch County recognizes that the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is authorized by Utah Code to mitigate damage to agricultural crops, equipment and improvements, and that a process to do so is in place. (Utah Code section 23-16-4)Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeWildlife populations shall not be increased nor shall new species be introduced until forage allocations have been provided and an impact analysis completed analyzing the effects on other wildlife species, available habitat, and livestock.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeReduction in forage allocation resulting from forage studies, drought, or other natural disasters will be shared proportionately by wildlife, livestock and other uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeIncreases in forage allocation resulting from improved range conditions shall be shared proportionally by wildlife, livestock and other uses.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeWildlife target levels and/or populations must not exceed the forage assigned in the resource management plan forage allocations.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeResource-use and management decisions by federal land management and regulatory agencies should support state-sponsored initiatives or programs designed to stabilize wildlife populations that may be experiencing a scientifically proven decline in numbers.Wasatch County General PlanCh. 6
WildlifeSet population objectives and manage elk populations at appropriate spatial scales that account for migration patterns.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeEstablish local advisory committees to review individual herd unit management plans when considering a change (increase or decrease) in the herd size objective.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeOn units where population decreases are necessary, UDWR will recommend short-term population objectives in unit management plans or increases in antlerless elk permits.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeUtilize antlerless harvest as the primary tool to manage elk populations within herd size objectives and to target specific areas where range concerns or depredation problems exist.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeProperly manage elk populations to minimize competition with mule deer on crucial mule deer range.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeIf drought related conditions and high elk densities are negatively impacting habitat, recommend additional antlerless elk permits at the August Wildlife Board meeting.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeDuring severe winters, aggressively use antlerless elk harvest (public hunters and DWR removal) to minimize conflicts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeConsider using over-the-counter cow elk permits to provide additional harvest and hunting pressure in areas of conflict.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan13
WildlifeOn units over objective where cow harvest is difficult to obtain, allow for cow harvest using a general season muzzleloader bull elk permit (similar to general season archery elk hunt).Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEncourage innovative ideas from regional biologists to manage towards population objectives.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeMonitor all elk populations by helicopter survey on a three year rotational basis to evaluate herd size, calf production, herd composition, and habitat use, as conditions and budgets allow.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEvaluate herd size and population trends on an annual basis.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeImplement research studies where needed to close information gaps.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeContinue to support the interagency big game range trend study of crucial ranges throughout the state.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeMonitor range condition, utilization, and trends annually as manpower and budget allow.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
Predator ControlUtilize the Predator Management Policy where needed to help achieve objectives for elk populations, including the management of wolves if necessary.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeInvestigate and manage disease outbreaks that threaten elk populations including CWD and brucellosis.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifePromote management practices that minimize disease risks such as discouraging baiting/feeding, conducting CWD surveillance, and assisting Department of Agricultural in monitoring elk farms/ranches for compliance.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeFollow the emergency big game winter feeding policy, and avoid unnecessary feeding of elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeContinue to provide incentive programs for landowners that will encourage elk populations on private land such as the CWMU, Landowner Association, and Walk-In Access programs.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeAddress all depredation problems in a timely and efficient manner to increase landowner tolerance of elk populations in accordance with current laws, rules, and policies.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIdentify and support the acquisition of property (fee title or conservation easements) from willing sellers that would better accommodate current population numbers or allow for increased elk populations.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIdentify future habitat restoration projects with stakeholders.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeIncrease tolerance of public land grazers not enrolled in a CWMU or LOA by conducting habitat projects that will benefit livestock and wildlife.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan14
WildlifeEducate the public on the use and validity of population modeling in wildlife management.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIncrease communication and understanding between UDWR and stakeholders regarding elk distributions, population estimates, hunt recommendations, and management decisions.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeOn units with high amounts of social conflict, create elk committees during unit plan revisions and/or hold open houses to obtain public input.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeEnforce existing laws that protect resources on public and private lands.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeCreate a private-lands-only permit to encourage and target cow elk harvest on private lands.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIncrease the number of general season cow elk a hunter may annually harvest, but only allow for 1 cow elk permit to be obtained through the public draw system.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeUse depredation permits and vouchers, public hunters, and/or UDWR removal to harvest resident elk on agricultural lands or where elk are creating conflicts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeIssue antlerless-elk-control permits on units that are over objective, in areas with limited access, units with low population objectives, or where hunter crowding is an issue.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeCoordinate season dates and permit numbers to distribute elk appropriately within a hunt unit and to achieve adequate harvest in areas of concern.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeInvestigate an incentive program for landowners not enrolled in the CWMU or LOA programs to qualify for a special drawing for bull elk permits/vouchers based on cow harvest. This program should be used on units exceeding their population objective.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeReview and modify eligibility requirements for existing landowner incentive programs (LOA, CWMU, WIA) as needed to increase cow elk harvest and/or improve elk distribution during hunting seasons.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeSecure easements to increase hunter access to elk on public and private lands from willing participants.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan15
WildlifeProvide information to educate counties, municipalities, and developers to promote zoning that benefits elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies and private landowners to properly manage and improve elk habitat, especially calving and wintering areas.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWork with state and federal land management agencies to use livestock as a management tool to enhance crucial elk ranges.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWatershed restoration initiative: Increase forage production by annually treating a minimum of 40,000 acres of elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies, conservation organizations, private landowners, and local leaders through the regional Watershed Restoration Initiative working groups to identify and prioritize elk habitats that are in need of enhancement or restoration.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeAcquire additional, important elk habitat from willing sellers to offset habitat loss.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSupport programs, such as conservation easements, that provide incentives to private landowners to keep prime elk habitat managed as rangeland.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeEducate the public on the value of the general license, conservation, and expo permits for funding elk habitat improvement projects.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeContinue to support the conservation permit and habitat enhancement programs that provide crucial funding for habitat improvement efforts.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSeek to maintain less than 2 miles of roads per square mile within crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeWork cooperatively with UDOT, county, state, and federal agencies to limit the impacts of roads on elk.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan16
WildlifeSupport the establishment of multi-agency OHV plans developed on a county or planning unit level to prevent resource damage and protect crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
WildlifeCoordinate with land management agencies and energy development proponents to develop an effective mitigation approach for oil, gas, and mining proposals and large scale developments (e.g., solar, wind, and recreation) which have the potential to impact crucial elk habitat.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
WildlifeEncourage energy development companies to avoid and minimize the impact of disturbance and use Best Management Practices that promote the conservation of wildlife resources.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
Noxious WeedsWork with land management agencies and county weed boards to control the spread of noxious and invasive weeds throughout the range of elk in Utah.Utah Statewide Elk Management Plan17
Land UseLand Use Policy 1 – The Commission encourages the coordination of general plans and land use regulations among governments within the Utah Lake Master Plan Area.Utah Lake Master Plan24
Land UseLand Use Policy 2 – The Commission encourages land uses in the Utah Lake Master Plan Area that are designed, located, and operated so as to protect or enhance the ecological function of Utah Lake’s natural resources.Utah Lake Master Plan24
Land UseLand Use Policy 3 – The Commission promotes compatible land use transitions and appropriate land use development by facilitating communication, cooperation and collaboration among local governments, state, and federal agencies, to effectively implement the Master Plan.Utah Lake Master Plan24
Law EnforcementLand Use Policy 4 The Commission encourages local governments and state and federal agencies to cooperate to provide effective and efficient law enforcement in the Utah Lake Master Plan Area.Utah Lake Master Plan24
Land UseLand Use Policy 5 – The Commission encourages that any recreational and commercial development project be consistent with this Master Plan.Utah Lake Master Plan24
Recreation and TourismTransportation Policy 3 – The Commission encourages member agencies to
develop trail ordinances and will pursue mechanisms and opportunities to
facilitate the completion of the trail around Utah Lake.
Utah Lake Master Plan28
Land AccessTransportation Policy 4 – The Commission encourages efforts to improve
access to existing and future destination points around Utah Lake.
Utah Lake Master Plan28
WildlifeNatural Resources Policy 1 – The Commission supports and encourages preservation of high value wildlife areas.Utah Lake Master Plan30
WildlifeNatural Resources Policy 2 – The Commission advocates creation of habitat buffer areas along the shore of Utah Lake in appropriate locations.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive SpeciesNatural Resources Policy 3 – The Commission values and supports efforts to recover federally listed threatened and endangered species and to prevent additional federal listings within the Utah Lake Master Plan Area.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Recreation and TourismNatural Resources Policy 4 – The Commission will take an active role in expanding and improving interpretive and directional signage to inform the public of the values of Utah Lake.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Noxious WeedsNatural Resources Policy 5 – The Commission encourages efforts to control invasive or undesirable plant, animal, and insect species.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Water Quality and HydrologyNatural Resources Policy 6 – The Commission encourages studies to determine the feasibility to reduce lake level fluctuation to accommodate Commission objectives such as recreational use and ecological integrity.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Land UseNatural Resources Policy 7 – The Commission will consider engineered solutions to challenges pertaining to Utah Lake as long as they are consistent with other goals and objectives of the Master Plan.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Water Quality and HydrologyNatural Resources Policy 8 – The Commission encourages and supports opportunities to improve Utah Lake water quality.Utah Lake Master Plan30
WildlifeNatural Resources Policy 9 –The Commission supports and encourages efforts to better understand the Utah Lake ecosystem through coordinated research and monitoring programs.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Water Quality and HydrologyNatural Resources Policy 10 – The Commission promotes the efficient use of Utah Lake’s water resources and encourages appropriate actions that may reduce evaporation and other losses.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Water Quality and HydrologyNatural Resources Policy 11 – The Commission encourages the thorough and expedited study of the effects of nutrients on beneficial uses of Utah Lake and supports the pursuit of a site-specific TDS (total dissolved solids) standard for Utah Lake.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Water Quality and HydrologyNatural Resources Policy 12 – The Commission encourages that planning efforts for the expansion or construction of wastewater treatment facilities consider nutrient removal in the design process.Utah Lake Master Plan30
Land AccessTransportation Policy 1 – The Commission will consider transportation projects based on whether or not they are consistent with the goals and objectives of the Master Plan.Utah Lake Master Plan28
Land AccessTransportation Policy 2 – The Commission will be a proactive participant to monitor and influence transportation planning efforts that may affect Utah Lake, its shorelines, or access to the lake.Utah Lake Master Plan28
Recreation and TourismRecreation Policy 1 – The Commission encourages efforts to improve public access facilities and increase opportunities for public access to Utah Lake.Utah Lake Master Plan35
Recreation and TourismRecreation Policy 2 –The Commission encourages development of recreation facilities that minimize adverse impacts to sensitive lands and resources and are consistent with the goals and objectives of the Master Plan.Utah Lake Master Plan35
Recreation and TourismRecreation Policy 3 – The Commission encourages the distribution of recreation opportunities around Utah Lake appropriate to population and needs.Utah Lake Master Plan35
Recreation and TourismRecreation Policy 4 – The Commission promotes the development of a variety of recreational opportunities at Utah Lake.Utah Lake Master Plan35
Noxious WeedsThe Goal of the Wasatch County Weed Board is to further our efforts through the county coordinator and weed area CWMA programs to work with the several agencies within the county for the purpose of control and containment of the spread of noxious weeds. Our goal also is to guide and assist the private land owners to control weeds on their lands.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County7
Noxious WeedsPrevention, early detection, control and eradication of noxious weed species are the most practical means of weed management. Prevention is best accomplished by ensuring that new weed species seed or vegetative reproductive plant parts are not introduced into an area.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County13
Noxious WeedsAwareness of noxious weeds and the problems they cause will help the general public to understand why a long-term program is important for Wasatch County.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County10
Noxious WeedsEducation concerning the impact of noxious weeds to the flora and fauna of the area is an important facet of any long-term weed management plan developed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County10
Noxious WeedsDevelop early detection methods and eradication programs for new invaders. This would include education and awareness programs where visitors and users of the area assist managers in locating and identifying new invasive weed species.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County14
Noxious WeedsProvide follow-up inspection to verify potential of new invasive weed species. Initiate an eradication program if new species are confirmed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County14
Noxious WeedsEnsure that seed, feed grains, hay, straw or mulch are free of weed reproductive plant parts that are used in the county.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County14
Noxious WeedsEncourage proper management of livestock used in or trailed through the county to slow noxious weed spread.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County15
Noxious WeedsEnsure that equipment or vehicles are free of weed reproductive plant parts prior to movement into and out of the county.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County15
Noxious WeedsEducate people to the variety of seed transport methodsCoordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County16
Noxious WeedsWork with the county and city planning staff and zoning committees to include consideration for noxious weed management when developing or approving subdivision plans, special use permits, or new leases.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County16
Noxious WeedsDevelop an Integrated Weed Management Program including mechanical, herbicide, biological and revegetation whereby all landowners within the county are working in a cooperative program that prevents weeds from producing seed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County16
Noxious WeedsDevelop weed-awareness programs for local residents, fishing and hunting license holders, the visiting public, and staff members of the different county, state, and federal agencies.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsThrough the County Weed Management Area (CWMA) programs every effort available will be used to help prevent the introduction of new weed infestations into the area and for the control of present infestations.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsFire suppression results in the disturbance of land surface by vehicles, foot traffic, packstock, chemicals, helicopter buckets, bulldozers, fire line explosives, pumps, and hand tools. Fire rehabilitation practices may include seeding the fire lines or burned areas, care needs to be taken that seed mixes are free of noxious weed seed.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsPlanning before fires occur can mitigate the impacts of noxious weeds during and after fire suppression activities.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County17
Noxious WeedsCreate a County Ordinance that prevents landscaping with invasive (noxious weeds) for ornamental purposes.Coordinate Noxious Weed Management Plan for Wasatch County18
WildlifeEstimate current population size and evaluate population trends; estimate amount and condition of habitat.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify research needs and knowledge gaps.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeDetermine population and habitat needs for the future.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify and discuss threats that have potential to impact sage-grouse in Morgan and Summit Counties, especially those associated with the five USFWS Listing Factors.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIncorporate management strategies from state and federal agency partners, local governments, and established rangewide conservation and management.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIncrease effective communication with all potential stakeholders in Morgan and Summit Counties and the state of Utah, through outreach, information distribution, and education.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeAddress and prioritize threats to aid in prioritizing management solutions.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3
WildlifeIdentify and pursue funding sources, or support partners in their pursuance of funding for projects that will help achieve specific strategies and actions.Greater Sage-grouse Local Conservation Plans (Morgan-Summit and Strawberry Valley)3